Issues in Teen Technology Use to Find Health Information

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Lesley Farmer, Ed.D., Professor, California State University Long Beach

Abstract

Teens need and want information about health issues. Even though teens tend to prefer asking people for help, increasingly they access digital resources because of the Internet’s availability, affordability, and anonymity. This paper presents a critical literature review of studies of teens’ online health information-seeking and discusses several issues related to teen technology use for seeking health information. The results indicate that teen health information interests vary by age, gender, social situation, and motivation. Several issues about how teens access and seek that information are discussed. The paper concludes with recommendations to insure optimal library services to address the health information needs of all teens.

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Posted in Volume 4: August 2014 | Leave a comment

From Dickens to 9/11: Exploring Graphic Nonfiction to Support the Secondary-School Curriculum

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By Barbara J. Guzzetti, Professor, Arizona State University and Marcia A. Mardis, Associate Professor, Florida State University

Abstract

Graphic nonfiction has been under-researched for content-area instruction, yet these hybrid texts may motivate reluctant readers as they blend elements of art, journalism, and scholarship. This study aimed to determine the appeal and utility of graphic nonfiction for teaching content concepts. It was collaboratively conducted by a literacy researcher and a library and information science researcher. The multimedia perspective of the New Literacies Studies informed the work. Graphic nonfiction titles Charles Dickens: Scenes from an Extraordinary Life and The 9/11 Report: A Graphic Adaptation were compared to terms/concepts in a literature textbook, a nonfiction trade book, and The 9/11 Report. This study illustrates the utility of graphic nonfiction for teaching content concepts. Students can learn key concepts and be motivated by these alternative texts. This study also demonstrated the need to include original source documents, textbooks, and graphic nonfiction to provide varying presentations of and perspectives on content concepts.
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Posted in Volume 4: May 2014 | Leave a comment

Motivational Attributes of Children and Teenagers Who Participate in Summer Reading Clubs

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By Stephanie Levitt Shaulskiy, Doctoral Candidate in Educational Psychology, Department of Educational Studies, The Ohio State University; Janet L. Capps, Assistant Professor, School of Library and Information Management, Emporia State University; Laura M. Justice, Executive Director of The Crane Center for Early Childhood Research and Policy and EHE Distinguished Professor, Teaching and Learning Administration, The Ohio State University; Lynley H. Anderman, Professor of Educational Psychology, ‘ Department of Educational Studies at The Ohio State University; and Columbus Metropolitan Library*

*Columbus Metropolitan Library is represented here as a Corporate Author. Numerous members of the Columbus Metropolitan Library system were involved in the conduct of this work, to include generating research aims, establishing and implementing research methods, and examining and interpreting research outcomes.

‘ Abstract

Library-based summer reading clubs are popular offerings across the country; however, very little is known about the children and teenagers who participate in them. This study examined demographic and motivational attributes of children and teenagers who participated in a summer reading club in a large midwestern city. The study also examined their perceptions about other possible extrinsic motivational reasons why they participated in the program (e.g., to get a prize). Results indicated that children and teenagers who participated in the summer reading club had high perceived competencies and value for reading across ages, and that the majority did not report participating to receive a prize (62.5%). Motivational attributes were also analyzed by gender and socioeconomic status (SES). Differences were noted for some dimensions of value for reading for gender, but no differences were noted for reading values or competencies for SES. The results of this study have implications for summer reading club design and the ways in which libraries attract students and motivate them to read.
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Posted in Volume 4: May 2014 | Leave a comment

Beyond Books, Nooks, and Dirty Looks: The History and Evolution of Library Services to Teens in the United States

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By Shari A. Lee, Assistant Professor, St. John’s University

Abstract

Public libraries have had a long, though decidedly less than adequate, tradition of serving teens. While there have been encouraging transformations occurring in many of these institutions, a significant number continue to lag in their efforts to serve this group. Underlying this lag is not only the dearth of research that examines public library services to teens but also the quality of several recently published books about teen library services. Building on a background discussion of the purpose that U.S. public libraries were meant to serve, the development and provision of library services to teens is considered with specific focus on issues that have influenced and/or presented barriers to these services. Finally, using a model for inquiry that draws on William Scott, who posits that institutions are comprised of three pillars that enable them to keep order and provide meaning to individuals, the paper proposes that researchers look to the institution rather than at the community for new insights on serving and connecting with teens as a user group in a more meaningful way.
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Posted in Volume 4: May 2014 | Leave a comment

More than Just Books: Librarians as a Source of Support for Cyberbullied Young Adults

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By Abigail L. Phillips, PhD Student, School of Library and Information Studies, Florida State University

Abstract

Young adults are becoming more and more engaged with social media for a variety of reasons. Social networking sites—such as Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter—provide them with free and open space for exchanges of ideas, collaboration, and expression. For the most part, these online interactions are positive, respectful, and socially responsible. However, a significant number of young adults are using social media for a darker and more dangerous purpose: cyberbullying. While this phenomenon has been discussed widely in the media, what is lacking is a clear and consistent understanding of cyberbullying.
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Posted in Volume 4: May 2014 | Leave a comment

Comics: A Once-Missed Opportunity

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By Carol L. Tilley, Assistant Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Abstract

During the 1940s and 1950s, comics were the most popular form of reading for young people in the United States, despite widespread disapproval for the medium by librarians and other guardians of reading tastes. Beyond simply reading comics, young people also used comics as a basis for developing participatory cultures. For instance, adolescents published fanzines and entered into political discourse about comics. This paper highlights some of these early examples of participatory cultures around comics to urge today’s librarians to reflect on what media and technology-based practices we may be neglecting to nurture among contemporary adolescents.
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Posted in Volume 4: May 2014 | Leave a comment

This, That, Both, Neither: The Badging Of Biracial Identity In Young Adult Realism

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By Sarah Hannah Gómez, Graduate Student, School of Library and Information Science, Simmons College

Editor’s Note: This, That, Both, Neither was accepted for the peer reviewed paper session at YALSA’s third annual Young Adult Literature Symposium held November 2-4, 2012 in St. Louis.’ ‘  The theme of the conference was “Hit me with the next big thing.”

Only in the lifetime of the Millennial generation has it become legally acceptable to mark more than one race on a federal form. In the 2010 Census, 2.9 percent of respondents indicated that they were two or more races, with even more assigning themselves other designations that speak to the many types of multiracial identities common today. As this population grows in real life, it also flourishes in young adult literature, where ever more protagonists identify with more than one racial or ethnic group and must decide how to assert themselves and what to call themselves. This paper explores some of these novels and tracks each character’s progress towards creating a “badge” of identity.
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Posted in Volume 3: April 2013 | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Taking a Dip in the Crazy Pool: The Evolution of X-Women From Heroic Subject to Sexual Object

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By Suzanne M. Stauffer, Associate Professor School of Library and Information Science, Louisiana State University

The X-Men presents a unique opportunity for examining changing social attitudes toward women in the evolution of the personality and character of the female X-Men to reflect the social construction of women. Analysis reveals that they reflect and reaffirm traditional patriarchal gender hierarchies and traditional American middle-class values and norms. Nearly all of the X-Women, regardless of their individual personality, physical characteristics, or superpower, share the same pattern of development. They are hypersexualized and hyperfetishized physically, emotionally, and psychologically. They are emotionally submissive to and dependent upon their male partners. Their powers are physically weaker than their male counterparts and they are usually incapable of managing those powers without masculine assistance. Their stories suggest that women who attempt to assume and exercise immense power are a danger to the very fabric of existence and that they will be punished for this unfeminine act with insanity or death or both.
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Posted in Volume 3: April 2013 | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

YA Literature: The Inside and Cover Story

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Editor’s Note: YA Literature: The Inside and Cover Story was accepted for the peer reviewed paper session at YALSA’s third annual Young Adult Literature Symposium held November 2-4, 2012 in St. Louis.’ ‘  The theme of the conference was “Hit me with the next big thing.”

By Regina Sierra Carter, PhD Student, Graduate School of Library and Information Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

The faces of today’s teens are undeniably transforming due to the changing faces and forms of today’s families.’ Although there are now more young adult (YA) books that feature minority/mixed race characters, help is still needed in the area of cover art to ensure that it accurately reflects the story within.’ This paper explores questionable cover art with regards to the presence of racial minority and mixed raced characters.’ Small-scale recommendations are offered for readers interested in where the future of cover art for YA literature may be headed.
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Posted in Volume 3: April 2013 | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment