Adolescent Females and the Graphic Novel: A Content Analysis

bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark

Emily Simmons, ELA Teacher, Hernando Middle School

Simmons, Emily. Adolescent Females and the Graphic Novel: A Content Analysis. Journal of Research on Libraries & Young Adults 6 (2015): n. page. Web. <Date accessed>.

Abstract

Numerous studies of adolescent reading preferences have found that fewer females than males are drawn to reading graphic novels. Why? Adolescent readers are diverse in gender and race/ethnicity as well as the disabilities they represent. Do main characters in graphic novels reflect that diversity? Has representation changed over time? Using a content analysis approach, this study examined the main characters in a set of recommended popular graphic novels for teens to determine the percentage of female protagonists and how that percentage has changed over a seven-year period. Additionally, the race/ethnicity and any disabilities of the female main characters were analyzed. The 70 recommended graphic novels and illustrated nonfiction for teens ages 12 to 18 used for the study were found on YALSA’s “Top Ten Great Graphic Novels for Teens” lists from 2007 through 2013. Female main characters were found in 46% of the titles, with 24% of these titles having only female main characters while 22% had both female and male main characters; the female main characters represented three of five race categories identified by the U.S. Census Bureau and four of the fourteen disability classifications identified by IDEA.

Continue reading

Posted in Volume 6: August 2015 | Tagged | Leave a comment

Teen Library Website Models: Identifying Design Models of Public Library Websites for Teens

bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark

Robin Naughton, Digital Systems Manager, Library, New York Academy of Medicine

Naughton, Robin. Teen Library Website Models: Identifying Design Models of Public Library Websites for Teens. Journal of Research on Libraries & Young Adults 6 (2015): n. page. Web. <Date accessed>.

Abstract

This paper identifies and seeks to understand website models of U.S. public library websites for teens, also known as teen library websites (TLWs). TLWs are sections of public library websites devoted to teens and only teens. Few studies have focused on TLWs, and exploring this aspect of public libraries provided an understanding of how public libraries address teen needs via their websites. TLWs were identified from the 2009 Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) data file, a downloadable Excel document of all data available from the IMLS Public Libraries Survey.[1] Using web content analysis, 60 TLWs were analyzed in 2012 and reanalyzed in 2015 to understand any changes over time. Four website models were identified, with the majority of TLWs adhering to the Reading Model, a text-heavy website with limited interactivity and media content. In addition, the results showed that in 2012 some public libraries moved from one website model to another while others no longer had TLWs in 2015. These findings suggest that there will be shifts in website design, but website models and access can be a guide to navigating changes. The paper concludes with a list of evaluation questions for best practices in designing TLWs.

Continue reading

Posted in Volume 6: August 2015 | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Call for Papers: LGBT Issues and Library Services for Teens

bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark

The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults is currently accepting submissions for a special themed issue. The issue will highlight research related to LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender) issues and public and school library services for teens. We also welcome research papers examining other diversity issues and the implications for teen library services. Researchers, librarians, graduate students, and others who conduct research related to young adults (ages 12 – 18) and libraries are invited to submit manuscripts. Papers describing both scholarly research (qualitative, quantitative, or theory development) as well as action research are welcome for peer review and consideration of publication. Papers that report library programs but lack an original research component will not be considered.

Writer’s guidelines are located at http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/author-guidelines/. Email manuscripts by October 30, 2015, to editor Denise Agosto at: yalsaresearch@gmail.com.

Posted in Call for Papers | Tagged , | Leave a comment

The Real Deal: Teen Characters with Autism in YA Novels

bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark

Marilyn Irwin, Ph.D., Emeritus Associate Professor, School of Informatics and Computing, Indiana University, Indianapolis

Annette Y. Goldsmith, Ph.D., Lecturer, Information School, University of Washington

Rachel Applegate, Ph.D., Chair & Associate Professor, Department of Library and Information Science, Indiana University, Indianapolis

Marilyn Irwin, Annette Y. Goldsmith, and Rachel Applegate. The Real Deal: Teen Characters with Autism in YA Novels. Journal of Research on Libraries & Young Adults 6 (2015): n. page. Web. <Date accessed>. 

Abstract

Between 2012 and 2014, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control revised their estimate of the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) from one in eighty-eight children1 in the United States to one in sixty-eight children.2 With this large number of youth with ASD in our communities, it is critical that accurate information be presented in YA literature, fiction as well as nonfiction, to increase understanding of the disorder. What is real in the depiction of autism in YA novels? Based on analysis of fifty-eight YA novels that include a young adult character with ASD, a portrait has been drawn of how they are treated, who their friends are, and where they go to school. The data from the novels were contrasted with current research involving actual youth with ASD to assess the accuracy of the fictional portrayals. Findings indicate that the depiction of educational placement and the behavior of others toward the characters in the books was a reasonable reflection of real life as shown in the research; however, fewer friendships were found in the novels than studies of actual adolescents with ASD indicate.

Continue reading

Posted in Selected Papers from the 2014 YALSA Young Adult Literature Symposium, Volume 6: April 2015 | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

You Are What You Read: Young Adult Literacy and Identity in Rural America

bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark

Robin A. Moeller, Assistant Professor, College of Education, Leadership and Educational Studies, Appalachian State University

Kim E. Becnel, Assistant Professor, College of Education, Leadership and Educational Studies, Appalachian State University

Moeller, Robin A. and Becnel, Kim E. . You Are What You Read: Young Adult Literacy and Identity in Rural America Journal of Research on Libraries & Young Adults 6 (2015): n. page. Web. <Date accessed>.

Abstract

The purpose of this empirical research study is to understand the reading habits and preferences of rural U.S. high school students as well as if and how they see their current and future lives depicted in media marketed to young adults. Using an inductive approach, we surveyed tenth-grade students in rural counties in one southeastern American state about their reading interests and habits and their self-perceptions and aspirations. This study provides insights into a large but invisible subculture of youth in the United States. The practical implications of this research include an increased understanding of rural teens’ relationship with identity and media that can be used by the school and library communities as they try to improve the offerings—in terms of collections, programming, and services—that they provide for teen audiences.

Continue reading

Posted in Selected Papers from the 2014 YALSA Young Adult Literature Symposium, Volume 6: April 2015 | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Connected Learning, Librarians, and Connecting Youth Interest

bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark

Crystle Martin, Postdoctoral Researcher, Digital Media and Learning Hub, University of California, Irvine

Martin, Crystle. Connected Learning, Librarians, and Connecting Youth Interest. Journal of Research on Libraries & Young Adults 6 (2015): n. page. Web. <Date accessed>.

Abstract

The purpose of this ethnographic study is to understand connected learning of youth in online communities and how these findings can influence the practice of librarians to support youth learning. Drawing from a two-and-a-half-year ethnography, I present data that was coded using the connected learning framework. This study provides insights into the role that librarians can play in the larger learning ecologies of youth. Finally, this paper gives practical implications for librarians based on the actions of youth, using a holistic approach to youth learning. It identifies librarians as ideal mentors to help youth connect their learning from interest spaces to academic and career spaces, allowing them to receive value and recognition for their skills and abilities. Continue reading

Posted in The Future of Library Services for and with Teens, Volume 6: March 2015 | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

The Impact of Assigned Reading on Reading Pleasure in Young Adults

bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark

Stacy Creel, Assistant Professor, School of Library & Information Science, University of Southern Mississippi

Creel, Stacy. “The Impact of Assigned Reading on Reading Pleasure in Young Adults.” Journal of Research on Libraries & Young Adults 5 (2015): n. page. Web. <Date accessed>.

Abstract

This research presents the results of a survey of 833 U.S. adolescents, ages twelve to eighteen years old. It was hypothesized that teachers are assigning reading (rather than students self-selecting books) and that this leads to dissatisfaction with reading. Additional factors (gender, age, and self-identification as a reader) were also examined for their influence on reading satisfaction. The results indicate that approximately one-third of the respondents were allowed to select books for school reading assignments and that self-selection had a statistical impact on their self-perceived reading pleasure. Limitations include geographic location, a non-random sample, and data collection by various surveyors. This study adds to the growing body of research showing that student self-selection of reading materials leads to greater pleasure and interest in reading.

Continue reading

Posted in The Future of Library Services for and with Teens, Volume 6: March 2015 | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Radical Change Theory: Framework for Empowering Digital Youth

bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark

Kyungwon Koh, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Oklahoma

Koh, Kyungwon. “Radical Change Theory: Framework for Empowering Digital Youth.” Journal of Research on Libraries & Young Adults 5 (2015): n. page. Web. <Date accessed>.

Abstract

Eliza T. Dresang influenced numerous researchers and professionals by equipping them to understand and better serve digital youth. This paper revisits her theory of Radical Change, which explains the synergistic combination of changing resources and youth in the digital age. The presented research applies and extends the theory by investigating the information behavior of digital youth. The study has two phases —Phase 1: content analysis of research literature; Phase 2: group and individual interviews with young adults who are members of an online community called Scratch. Selected findings illustrate the ways in which digital youth have an increased sense of control over learning, creative, and social aspects of their life. The study demonstrates that Radical Change theory provides a unique perspective to ferret out the potential of non-traditional information behaviors. The theory continues to be a tool for enhancing a sense of agency for digital youth by increasing their capacity to learn, create, and socialize. Future research applying the theory could explore how the dynamic interactions between changing resources and youth may have an impact on youth obtaining twenty-first-century skills.

Continue reading

Posted in Eliza T. Dresang Memorial Issue, Volume 5: January 2015 | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Putting Youth First: The Radical Eliza T. Dresang

bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark

J. Elizabeth Mills, Annette Y. Goldsmith, Kathleen Campana, Beth J. Patin, Sarah A. Evans

Mills, J. Elizabeth, et al. “Putting Youth First: The Radical Eliza T. Dresang.” Journal of Research on Libraries & Young Adults 5 (2015): n. page. Web. <Date accessed>.

Abstract

This tribute presents a multi-faceted, multi-voiced perspective on the career and work of the late Dr. Eliza T. Dresang through the words of her colleagues. Dresang’s groundbreaking work, Radical Change: Books for Youth in a Digital Age (1999), grew out of conversations with colleagues that were facilitated by her service on book award and other committees. In her research, she pursued the larger connections between children’s publishing and the burgeoning digital world, and she had an immeasurable impact on the world of children’s and teen library services. She also influenced future youth services librarians by championing groundbreaking changes to the library school curriculum at the University of Washington. Throughout her career, Dresang advocated for services and literature that keep the needs of youth at their core. Her focus on the inclusion of all young people is evident from her work with special needs children as well as her courses on multicultural resources for youth and developing cultural competency among LIS professionals. This article includes interactive links to articles and audio interviews with colleagues that speak to the impact of Dresang’s research.

Continue reading

Posted in Eliza T. Dresang Memorial Issue, Volume 5: January 2015 | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Looking at Kim Dong Hwa’s Color Trilogy through the Prism of Radical Change

bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark

Jonathan M. Hollister and Don Latham

Hollister, Jonathan M., and Don Latham. “Looking at Kim Dong Hwa’s Color Trilogy through the Prism of Radical Change.” Journal of Research on Libraries & Young Adults 5 (2015): n. page. Web. <Date accessed>.

Abstract

This essay examines Kim Dong Hwa’s manhwa (Korean graphic novel) series the Color Trilogy using the critical framework of Eliza Dresang’s Radical Change theory. This theory has had a significant impact on children’s and young adult literature scholarship in the years since the publication of her 1999 book, Radical Change: Books for Youth in a Digital Age. In the book, Dresang devoted very little space to discussing graphic novels. However, in a subsequent essay published in 2008, Dresang states that had she been writing the book then, she would have devoted at least one full chapter to a discussion of the graphic novel format. We attempt to extend Dresang’s work by examining Kim’s trilogy through the prism of Radical Change theory. We argue that all three types of Radical Change—Changing Forms and Formats, Changing Perspectives, and Changing Boundaries—are evident in Kim’s sensitive, poetic story of a young girl’s sexual awakening in early twentieth-century rural Korea.

Continue reading

Posted in Eliza T. Dresang Memorial Issue, Volume 5: January 2015 | Tagged , , | Leave a comment