Find Poetry: Using Found Poems in School and Public Libraries to Enhance Student Creativity and Writing

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Janet Hilbun, PhD, University of North Texas

Hilbun, Janet. Find Poetry: Using Found Poems in School and Public Libraries to Enhance Student Creativity and Writing. Journal of Research on Libraries & Young Adults 6 (2015): n. page. Web. <Date accessed>.

Abstract

“Found poems” are a type of poetry “created by taking words, phrases, and sometimes whole passages from other sources and reframing them as poetry by making changes in spacing and lines, or by adding or deleting text, thus imparting new meaning” (Wikipedia). Almost anything can be used to create a found poem, and found poetry can be used in a variety of ways to enhance learning. By using primary sources or textbooks, students can use found poetry as a way to summarize, to analyze, to present facts, to organize information, to create new ideas, and to enhance classroom learning. Examples of ways to use this type of poetry in the classroom and library are provided. Use of found poetry will be linked to cognitive development and educational theory.

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Posted in Volume 6: November 2015 | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Future of Library and Museum Services Supporting Teen Learning: Perceptions of Professionals in Learning Labs and Makerspaces

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June Abbas, PhD, School of Library and Information Studies, University of Oklahoma.

Kyungwon Koh, PhD, School of Library and Information Studies, University of Oklahoma.

Abbas, June and Koh, Kyungwon. Future of Library and Museum Services Supporting Teen Learning:  Perceptions of Professionals in Learning Labs and Makerspaces. Journal of Research on Libraries & Young Adults 6 (2015): n. page. Web. <Date accessed>.

Abstract

Learning Labs and Makerspaces provide informal learning spaces in which teens can create, invent, socialize, and work with mentors and peers. These innovative learning spaces facilitate teens’ authentic and social learning experiences, promoting their twenty-first-century skills and multiple literacies. Little research has focused on the challenges, achievements, or goals of professionals in these spaces. This study addresses this gap by studying the experiences and perceptions of learning space professionals. The research question is: What are the challenges, achievements, and goals perceived by professionals of learning spaces in libraries and museums? We discovered the following challenges: having enough personnel, obtaining necessary funding, changing the perceptions of library and teen learning, being able to develop a vision, and providing consistent access to the space. Achievements included: increased teen engagement, staff developing necessary skills, and changing the perception of what a learning space can provide. Goals emphasized the desire to sustain and expand learning space programming, as well as other professional goals. Evaluation approaches included mainly outcome measures, though some output measures continue to be used. Lastly, implications for practice and LIS education are discussed.

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Book Tweets and Snappy Reads: Booktalking to Engage Millennial Teens

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Vanessa Irvin, Assistant Professor, Library and Information Science Program

Irvin, Vanessa. Book Tweets and Snappy Reads: Booktalking to Engage Millennial Teens. Journal of Research on Libraries & Young Adults 6 (2015): n. page. Web. <Date accessed>.

Abstract

Booktalking is an essential professional competency for young adult (YA) librarians, as it connects teen readers with text and literature for the purpose of instilling viable lifelong reading practices. This article introduces “Booktalking to Engage Millennial Teens” (BEMT), a collection of research-supported booktalking techniques that have been effectively taught across two ALA-accredited Library and Information Science (LIS) programs within the past decade. The BEMT techniques promote booktalks by taking into careful consideration contemporary teens’ social developmental multitasking literacy skills across various technology platforms including computers, smartphones, and social media.[i] The research explored in this work substantiates ways in which YA librarians can more effectively engage with these young audiences such that their approach is more appropriately aligned with young adult developmental needs. In an era where teen readers are looking to connect with multimodal texts that are engaging, relative, and edifying, I posit that the BEMT techniques discussed here are a renewed approach to booktalking that promotes a vital competency of contemporary YA librarianship.

Keywords: teens, young adults, literacy practices, adolescent development, booktalking, readers advisory, techniques, literature.

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Posted in Volume 6: November 2015 | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

YouthStudio: Designing Public Library YA Spaces with Teens

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Colin Rhinesmith, Assistant Professor, School of Library and Information Studies, University of Oklahoma

Molly Dettmann, Graduate Student, School of Library and Information Studies, University of Oklahoma

Michael Pierson, Graduate Student, School of Library and Information Studies, University of Oklahoma

Rebecca Spence, Graduate Student, School of Library and Information Studies, University of Oklahoma

Rhinesmith, Colin, Molly Dettmann, Michael Pierson, and Rebecca Spence. YouthStudio: Designing Public Library YA Spaces with Teens. Journal of Research on Libraries & Young Adults 6 (2015): n. page. Web. <Date accessed>.

Abstract

This paper describes how research was used to guide the design, implementation, and evaluation of a public library young adult (YA) space design program with teens and librarians through a community–university partnership. Previous studies have shown why it’s necessary for librarians to allow teens to participate in public library YA space design projects. This paper seeks to fill a gap in the literature by contributing a theoretical and methodological framework to study YA space design projects with teens and librarians using critical pedagogy and ethnographic action research. Community informatics is the theory and practice of using information and communication technology in support of community-defined development goals, which might include digital inclusion, civic engagement, and social justice. The Youth Community Informatics Studio, or YouthStudio, is introduced as a model of engaged scholarship that embraces both critical pedagogy and ethnographic action research to show how researchers can work with teens and librarians to design, implement, and evaluate YA space design projects in public libraries, as sites where teens can engage in social change.

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Examining Inclusive Programming in a Middle School Library: A Case Study of Adolescents Who Are Differently- and Typically-Able

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Clayton A. Copeland, Director, Laboratory for Leadership in the Equity of Access and Diversity, School of Library and Information Science, University of South Carolina

Karen Gavigan, Associate Professor, School of Library and Information Science, University of South Carolina

Copeland, Clayton A. and Karen Gavigan. Examining Inclusive Programming in a Middle School Library:  A Case Study of Adolescents Who Are Differently- and Typically-Able. Journal of Research on Libraries & Young Adults 6 (2015): n. page. Web. <Date accessed>.

Abstract

Numerous national and international studies have shown the importance of school libraries and librarians in students’ educations, including literacy skill development and academic achievement. However, published research investigating school library accessibility and services from the perspectives of students who are differently-able are extremely limited, as are studies of inclusive library programming, or programming serving both typically-able and differently-able students. This case study examines inclusive library programming with adolescents in a middle school library. Findings indicate that the impact of inclusive school library programming was meaningful and often extended beyond the library’s walls. Inclusive library programming resulted in skill development among the students who are differently-able and an appreciation for books and reading for all of the students. Lessons that began in the library, including those of acceptance and the realization that abilities are born through differences, helped define the school culture. The findings from this study are useful for guiding inclusive programming for other school library grade levels, as well as in public library settings.

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Posted in Volume 6: November 2015 | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Adolescent Females and the Graphic Novel: A Content Analysis

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Emily Simmons, ELA Teacher, Hernando Middle School

Simmons, Emily. Adolescent Females and the Graphic Novel: A Content Analysis. Journal of Research on Libraries & Young Adults 6 (2015): n. page. Web. <Date accessed>.

Abstract

Numerous studies of adolescent reading preferences have found that fewer females than males are drawn to reading graphic novels. Why? Adolescent readers are diverse in gender and race/ethnicity as well as the disabilities they represent. Do main characters in graphic novels reflect that diversity? Has representation changed over time? Using a content analysis approach, this study examined the main characters in a set of recommended popular graphic novels for teens to determine the percentage of female protagonists and how that percentage has changed over a seven-year period. Additionally, the race/ethnicity and any disabilities of the female main characters were analyzed. The 70 recommended graphic novels and illustrated nonfiction for teens ages 12 to 18 used for the study were found on YALSA’s “Top Ten Great Graphic Novels for Teens” lists from 2007 through 2013. Female main characters were found in 46% of the titles, with 24% of these titles having only female main characters while 22% had both female and male main characters; the female main characters represented three of five race categories identified by the U.S. Census Bureau and four of the fourteen disability classifications identified by IDEA.

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Posted in Volume 6: August 2015 | Tagged | Leave a comment

Teen Library Website Models: Identifying Design Models of Public Library Websites for Teens

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Robin Naughton, Digital Systems Manager, Library, New York Academy of Medicine

Naughton, Robin. Teen Library Website Models: Identifying Design Models of Public Library Websites for Teens. Journal of Research on Libraries & Young Adults 6 (2015): n. page. Web. <Date accessed>.

Abstract

This paper identifies and seeks to understand website models of U.S. public library websites for teens, also known as teen library websites (TLWs). TLWs are sections of public library websites devoted to teens and only teens. Few studies have focused on TLWs, and exploring this aspect of public libraries provided an understanding of how public libraries address teen needs via their websites. TLWs were identified from the 2009 Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) data file, a downloadable Excel document of all data available from the IMLS Public Libraries Survey.[1] Using web content analysis, 60 TLWs were analyzed in 2012 and reanalyzed in 2015 to understand any changes over time. Four website models were identified, with the majority of TLWs adhering to the Reading Model, a text-heavy website with limited interactivity and media content. In addition, the results showed that in 2012 some public libraries moved from one website model to another while others no longer had TLWs in 2015. These findings suggest that there will be shifts in website design, but website models and access can be a guide to navigating changes. The paper concludes with a list of evaluation questions for best practices in designing TLWs.

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Posted in Volume 6: August 2015 | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Call for Papers: LGBT Issues and Library Services for Teens

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The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults is currently accepting submissions for a special themed issue. The issue will highlight research related to LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender) issues and public and school library services for teens. We also welcome research papers examining other diversity issues and the implications for teen library services. Researchers, librarians, graduate students, and others who conduct research related to young adults (ages 12 – 18) and libraries are invited to submit manuscripts. Papers describing both scholarly research (qualitative, quantitative, or theory development) as well as action research are welcome for peer review and consideration of publication. Papers that report library programs but lack an original research component will not be considered.

Writer’s guidelines are located at http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/author-guidelines/. Email manuscripts by October 30, 2015, to editor Denise Agosto at: yalsaresearch@gmail.com.

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The Real Deal: Teen Characters with Autism in YA Novels

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Marilyn Irwin, Ph.D., Emeritus Associate Professor, School of Informatics and Computing, Indiana University, Indianapolis

Annette Y. Goldsmith, Ph.D., Lecturer, Information School, University of Washington

Rachel Applegate, Ph.D., Chair & Associate Professor, Department of Library and Information Science, Indiana University, Indianapolis

Marilyn Irwin, Annette Y. Goldsmith, and Rachel Applegate. The Real Deal: Teen Characters with Autism in YA Novels. Journal of Research on Libraries & Young Adults 6 (2015): n. page. Web. <Date accessed>. 

Abstract

Between 2012 and 2014, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control revised their estimate of the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) from one in eighty-eight children1 in the United States to one in sixty-eight children.2 With this large number of youth with ASD in our communities, it is critical that accurate information be presented in YA literature, fiction as well as nonfiction, to increase understanding of the disorder. What is real in the depiction of autism in YA novels? Based on analysis of fifty-eight YA novels that include a young adult character with ASD, a portrait has been drawn of how they are treated, who their friends are, and where they go to school. The data from the novels were contrasted with current research involving actual youth with ASD to assess the accuracy of the fictional portrayals. Findings indicate that the depiction of educational placement and the behavior of others toward the characters in the books was a reasonable reflection of real life as shown in the research; however, fewer friendships were found in the novels than studies of actual adolescents with ASD indicate.

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Posted in Selected Papers from the 2014 YALSA Young Adult Literature Symposium, Volume 6: April 2015 | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

You Are What You Read: Young Adult Literacy and Identity in Rural America

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Robin A. Moeller, Assistant Professor, College of Education, Leadership and Educational Studies, Appalachian State University

Kim E. Becnel, Assistant Professor, College of Education, Leadership and Educational Studies, Appalachian State University

Moeller, Robin A. and Becnel, Kim E. . You Are What You Read: Young Adult Literacy and Identity in Rural America Journal of Research on Libraries & Young Adults 6 (2015): n. page. Web. <Date accessed>.

Abstract

The purpose of this empirical research study is to understand the reading habits and preferences of rural U.S. high school students as well as if and how they see their current and future lives depicted in media marketed to young adults. Using an inductive approach, we surveyed tenth-grade students in rural counties in one southeastern American state about their reading interests and habits and their self-perceptions and aspirations. This study provides insights into a large but invisible subculture of youth in the United States. The practical implications of this research include an increased understanding of rural teens’ relationship with identity and media that can be used by the school and library communities as they try to improve the offerings—in terms of collections, programming, and services—that they provide for teen audiences.

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Posted in Selected Papers from the 2014 YALSA Young Adult Literature Symposium, Volume 6: April 2015 | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment