Radical Change Theory: Framework for Empowering Digital Youth

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Kyungwon Koh, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Oklahoma

Koh, Kyungwon. “Radical Change Theory: Framework for Empowering Digital Youth.” Journal of Research on Libraries & Young Adults 5 (2015): n. page. Web. <Date accessed>.

Abstract

Eliza T. Dresang influenced numerous researchers and professionals by equipping them to understand and better serve digital youth. This paper revisits her theory of Radical Change, which explains the synergistic combination of changing resources and youth in the digital age. The presented research applies and extends the theory by investigating the information behavior of digital youth. The study has two phases —Phase 1: content analysis of research literature; Phase 2: group and individual interviews with young adults who are members of an online community called Scratch. Selected findings illustrate the ways in which digital youth have an increased sense of control over learning, creative, and social aspects of their life. The study demonstrates that Radical Change theory provides a unique perspective to ferret out the potential of non-traditional information behaviors. The theory continues to be a tool for enhancing a sense of agency for digital youth by increasing their capacity to learn, create, and socialize. Future research applying the theory could explore how the dynamic interactions between changing resources and youth may have an impact on youth obtaining twenty-first-century skills.

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Posted in Eliza T. Dresang Memorial Issue, Volume 5: January 2015 | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Putting Youth First: The Radical Eliza T. Dresang

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J. Elizabeth Mills, Annette Y. Goldsmith, Kathleen Campana, Beth J. Patin, Sarah A. Evans

Mills, J. Elizabeth, et al. “Putting Youth First: The Radical Eliza T. Dresang.” Journal of Research on Libraries & Young Adults 5 (2015): n. page. Web. <Date accessed>.

Abstract

This tribute presents a multi-faceted, multi-voiced perspective on the career and work of the late Dr. Eliza T. Dresang through the words of her colleagues. Dresang’s groundbreaking work, Radical Change: Books for Youth in a Digital Age (1999), grew out of conversations with colleagues that were facilitated by her service on book award and other committees. In her research, she pursued the larger connections between children’s publishing and the burgeoning digital world, and she had an immeasurable impact on the world of children’s and teen library services. She also influenced future youth services librarians by championing groundbreaking changes to the library school curriculum at the University of Washington. Throughout her career, Dresang advocated for services and literature that keep the needs of youth at their core. Her focus on the inclusion of all young people is evident from her work with special needs children as well as her courses on multicultural resources for youth and developing cultural competency among LIS professionals. This article includes interactive links to articles and audio interviews with colleagues that speak to the impact of Dresang’s research.

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Posted in Eliza T. Dresang Memorial Issue, Volume 5: January 2015 | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Looking at Kim Dong Hwa’s Color Trilogy through the Prism of Radical Change

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Jonathan M. Hollister and Don Latham

Hollister, Jonathan M., and Don Latham. “Looking at Kim Dong Hwa’s Color Trilogy through the Prism of Radical Change.” Journal of Research on Libraries & Young Adults 5 (2015): n. page. Web. <Date accessed>.

Abstract

This essay examines Kim Dong Hwa’s manhwa (Korean graphic novel) series the Color Trilogy using the critical framework of Eliza Dresang’s Radical Change theory. This theory has had a significant impact on children’s and young adult literature scholarship in the years since the publication of her 1999 book, Radical Change: Books for Youth in a Digital Age. In the book, Dresang devoted very little space to discussing graphic novels. However, in a subsequent essay published in 2008, Dresang states that had she been writing the book then, she would have devoted at least one full chapter to a discussion of the graphic novel format. We attempt to extend Dresang’s work by examining Kim’s trilogy through the prism of Radical Change theory. We argue that all three types of Radical Change—Changing Forms and Formats, Changing Perspectives, and Changing Boundaries—are evident in Kim’s sensitive, poetic story of a young girl’s sexual awakening in early twentieth-century rural Korea.

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Posted in Eliza T. Dresang Memorial Issue, Volume 5: January 2015 | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Eliza Dresang and the Boy Who Lived

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Colette Drouillard, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Library and Information Studies, Valdosta State University

Drouillard, Colette. “Eliza Dresang and The Boy Who Lived.” Journal of Research on Libraries & Young Adults 5 (2015): n. page. Web.  <Date accessed>. Adobe_PDF_icon

Eliza Dresang’s expertise in children’s and young adult literature is evident through the wide range of books, articles, committees, and projects she wrote or contributed to over the course of her career. Her interest in Harry Potter was a very small and seemingly minor component of her entire body of work; however, this series of books and the impact they had on young readers captivated her attention in a variety of ways over the course of the publication of the books and continued until the time of her death.

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Posted in Eliza T. Dresang Memorial Issue, Volume 5: January 2015 | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Issues in Teen Technology Use to Find Health Information

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Lesley Farmer, Ed.D., Professor, California State University Long Beach

Abstract

Teens need and want information about health issues. Even though teens tend to prefer asking people for help, increasingly they access digital resources because of the Internet’s availability, affordability, and anonymity. This paper presents a critical literature review of studies of teens’ online health information-seeking and discusses several issues related to teen technology use for seeking health information. The results indicate that teen health information interests vary by age, gender, social situation, and motivation. Several issues about how teens access and seek that information are discussed. The paper concludes with recommendations to insure optimal library services to address the health information needs of all teens.

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Posted in Volume 4: August 2014 | Leave a comment

From Dickens to 9/11: Exploring Graphic Nonfiction to Support the Secondary-School Curriculum

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By Barbara J. Guzzetti, Professor, Arizona State University and Marcia A. Mardis, Associate Professor, Florida State University

Abstract

Graphic nonfiction has been under-researched for content-area instruction, yet these hybrid texts may motivate reluctant readers as they blend elements of art, journalism, and scholarship. This study aimed to determine the appeal and utility of graphic nonfiction for teaching content concepts. It was collaboratively conducted by a literacy researcher and a library and information science researcher. The multimedia perspective of the New Literacies Studies informed the work. Graphic nonfiction titles Charles Dickens: Scenes from an Extraordinary Life and The 9/11 Report: A Graphic Adaptation were compared to terms/concepts in a literature textbook, a nonfiction trade book, and The 9/11 Report. This study illustrates the utility of graphic nonfiction for teaching content concepts. Students can learn key concepts and be motivated by these alternative texts. This study also demonstrated the need to include original source documents, textbooks, and graphic nonfiction to provide varying presentations of and perspectives on content concepts.
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Posted in Volume 4: May 2014 | Leave a comment

Motivational Attributes of Children and Teenagers Who Participate in Summer Reading Clubs

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By Stephanie Levitt Shaulskiy, Doctoral Candidate in Educational Psychology, Department of Educational Studies, The Ohio State University; Janet L. Capps, Assistant Professor, School of Library and Information Management, Emporia State University; Laura M. Justice, Executive Director of The Crane Center for Early Childhood Research and Policy and EHE Distinguished Professor, Teaching and Learning Administration, The Ohio State University; Lynley H. Anderman, Professor of Educational Psychology, ‘ Department of Educational Studies at The Ohio State University; and Columbus Metropolitan Library*

*Columbus Metropolitan Library is represented here as a Corporate Author. Numerous members of the Columbus Metropolitan Library system were involved in the conduct of this work, to include generating research aims, establishing and implementing research methods, and examining and interpreting research outcomes.

‘ Abstract

Library-based summer reading clubs are popular offerings across the country; however, very little is known about the children and teenagers who participate in them. This study examined demographic and motivational attributes of children and teenagers who participated in a summer reading club in a large midwestern city. The study also examined their perceptions about other possible extrinsic motivational reasons why they participated in the program (e.g., to get a prize). Results indicated that children and teenagers who participated in the summer reading club had high perceived competencies and value for reading across ages, and that the majority did not report participating to receive a prize (62.5%). Motivational attributes were also analyzed by gender and socioeconomic status (SES). Differences were noted for some dimensions of value for reading for gender, but no differences were noted for reading values or competencies for SES. The results of this study have implications for summer reading club design and the ways in which libraries attract students and motivate them to read.
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Posted in Volume 4: May 2014 | Leave a comment

Beyond Books, Nooks, and Dirty Looks: The History and Evolution of Library Services to Teens in the United States

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By Shari A. Lee, Assistant Professor, St. John’s University

Abstract

Public libraries have had a long, though decidedly less than adequate, tradition of serving teens. While there have been encouraging transformations occurring in many of these institutions, a significant number continue to lag in their efforts to serve this group. Underlying this lag is not only the dearth of research that examines public library services to teens but also the quality of several recently published books about teen library services. Building on a background discussion of the purpose that U.S. public libraries were meant to serve, the development and provision of library services to teens is considered with specific focus on issues that have influenced and/or presented barriers to these services. Finally, using a model for inquiry that draws on William Scott, who posits that institutions are comprised of three pillars that enable them to keep order and provide meaning to individuals, the paper proposes that researchers look to the institution rather than at the community for new insights on serving and connecting with teens as a user group in a more meaningful way.
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Posted in Volume 4: May 2014 | Leave a comment

More than Just Books: Librarians as a Source of Support for Cyberbullied Young Adults

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By Abigail L. Phillips, PhD Student, School of Library and Information Studies, Florida State University

Abstract

Young adults are becoming more and more engaged with social media for a variety of reasons. Social networking sites–such as Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter–provide them with free and open space for exchanges of ideas, collaboration, and expression. For the most part, these online interactions are positive, respectful, and socially responsible. However, a significant number of young adults are using social media for a darker and more dangerous purpose: cyberbullying. While this phenomenon has been discussed widely in the media, what is lacking is a clear and consistent understanding of cyberbullying.
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Posted in Volume 4: May 2014 | Leave a comment

Comics: A Once-Missed Opportunity

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By Carol L. Tilley, Assistant Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Abstract

During the 1940s and 1950s, comics were the most popular form of reading for young people in the United States, despite widespread disapproval for the medium by librarians and other guardians of reading tastes. Beyond simply reading comics, young people also used comics as a basis for developing participatory cultures. For instance, adolescents published fanzines and entered into political discourse about comics. This paper highlights some of these early examples of participatory cultures around comics to urge today’s librarians to reflect on what media and technology-based practices we may be neglecting to nurture among contemporary adolescents.
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Posted in Volume 4: May 2014 | Leave a comment