Skip to content

Tweets of the Week – May 29th

2015 May 29
by Jennifer Rummel
  • Email
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Plus
  • LinkedIn
  • Pinterest
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • RSS

BEA is this week, if you’re looking for some new titles, new authors, or to see what’s going on check out #BEA15 for all the fun.

 

Books:
 · It’s officially season! Read our 7 favorite quotes from commencement speeches delivered by :

 · Jodi Picoult talks about her new book and writing YA from Bustle
 · Campaign Turning Book-Nerd Selfies Into Book Donations For Kids In Need | Bustle
 · LGBTQ Publishing: Titles aimed at young readers address the transgender experience
Exciting! Fox picks up rights to THIS DARK ENDEAVOR for fab director (Dawn Planet Apes, Cloverfield.)
 · The Shadowhunters TV Series News: Episode 1001 Starts Filming TODAY!
 Sneak peek photos from week 1 of shooting ! Are you excited?

Librarianship:
 · Washington Study Further Ties Quality Library Programs to Student Success |

 · Libraries staffed with professional librarians are the heart of a school. shares an experience
Career Conversations – What I learned when my teens wanted to host a program series on careers —

 

Blogs:
 · Librarian helps teen find new outlook on life through books | Gannett

 · How We Talk About the Victims of Sexual Abuse Matters — Teen Librarian Toolbox
 · This list of YA books for black girls is fantastic:
 · Teaching Teenagers to Develop Their Emotional Intelligence
 · Hands-on Projects and Titles that Celebrate Maker and Latino Cultures

Just for Fun:
 ·Are you the smartest girl in America? Take this quiz inspired by ‘s book!

 · Click of the day: see Shaun Tan’s sculptures for a German edition of tales by the Brothers Grimm | Brain Pickings
 · Know a fan? “Write Like a Ninja” contest lets kids get published in LEGO: Ninjago book!

~ Jennifer Rummel currently reading Rook by Sharon Cameron

YA Lit Dream Interpretation: Spiders

2015 May 28
  • Email
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Plus
  • LinkedIn
  • Pinterest
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • RSS

In your dream everything seems normal, its not a nightmare at all.  Then something touches your arm.  You brush it away but still persists.  Your concentration is broken so you look for the source of your distraction.  To your horror you see a giant spider.  No matter how you try you cannot brush it off your clothes. 

In a panic you wake up.  Terrified and feeling a bit like Ron Weasley who is equally terrified of spiders, you wonder “Why spiders? Why couldn’t it be “Follow the butterflies?” (IMDB)   Freud might have a lot of explanations for your dream.  But a better interpretation is: you need fiction to solve your nightmarish concerns.  No need to psychoanalyze when some reader’s advisory  has the cure.

To see a spider in your dream indicates that you are feeling like an outsider in some situation. Or perhaps you want to keep your distance and stay away from an alluring and tempting situation. (DreamMoods)

While all dreams have positive and negative connotations, this dream interpretation will focus on the good outcomes of seeing a spider in your dreams.  Spiders can represent going against the popular crowd and finding your own way.  These YA novels will inspire you reject disruptive influences in your life by thinking about who your friends really are.

  • Conversion by Katherine Howe – Strangely similar illnesses strike the students at St. Joa18667792n’s
    Academy in Danvers, Massachusetts as the disease that sicked girls in Salem Village three centuries ago.  Colleen Rowly is determined not to panic as the symptoms spread among other students and several of her friends.  While accusations fly and talk show hosts salivate over such a juicy story, only Colleen sees the connection between to the Arthur Miller play, The Crucible.  Can Colleen find the cause of the illness before she becomes sick as well?

 

  • Shelter by Harlan Coben – After tragic events tear Mickey Bolitar away from his parents, he is shelterforced to live with his estranged Uncle Myron.  After switching high schools, Mickey finds both friends and enemies, but when his new new girlfriend, Ashley, vanishes, he follows her trail into a seedy underworld that reveals she is not what she seems to be.  Other mysteries wait to be unraveled as Mickey’s dad may not be dead.  Secrets from the Bat Lady and his mother’s drug addiction create a reality of suspicion and intrigue for Mickey to navigate solo.

read more…

Diverse YA Books from BEA

2015 May 27
  • Email
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Plus
  • LinkedIn
  • Pinterest
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • RSS

I’m lucky enough to have the opportunity to attend BEA (Book Expo America) this week in NYC since I live in NJ.  BEA will be held in Chicago next year, so I think this is the last time I’ll be going for a long time. I thought I would help those of you out who are going – or not going – by highlighting some of the diverse YA books available as ARCs that you might want to be on the lookout for. The need for more diversity in youth literature is ongoing, led largely by the We Need Diverse Books campaign. The following list of books and their descriptions are taken directly from SLJ’s BEA Guide to ARCs & Signings. 

Photo May 25, 4 48 16 PMLizard Radio by Pat Schmatz (Candlewick, 9/8/15, ages 14 & up)

In a futuristic society run by an all-powerful Gov, a bender teen on the cusp of adulthood has choices to make that will change her life – and maybe the world by the author of Blue Fish.

 

 

Photo May 25, 4 25 32 PMThe Bamboo Sword by Margi Preus. (Abrams, 9/15/15, ages 10-14)

This is a companion book to Preus’s 2011 Newbery Honor Book Heart of a Samurai. In 1853 in Japan, Yoshi, a Japanese boy who dreams of someday becoming a samurai is taken up by Manjiro and becomes his servant and secret watchdog. Meanwhile, Jack, a cabin boy on Commodore Matthew Perry’s USS Susquehanna, becomes separated from his American companions while on shore. When he and Yoshi cross paths, they set out on a grand adventure to get Jack back to his ship before he is discovered by the shogun’s samurai.

Photo May 25, 6 15 19 PMA Step Towards Falling by Cammie McGovern (HarperCollins, 10/13/15, ages14-17)

Sometimes the worst thing you can do is nothing at all. This honest and heartfelt novel by the author of Say What You Will follows a disabled young adult who is attacked and a fellow student who witnessed the crime but failed to act.

 

 

Photo May 25, 7 46 04 PMNot if I See You First by Eric Lindstrom (Little, Brown; 12/1/15, ages 15-18)

Parker Grant is a junior in high school who loves to run, has great friends, and isn’t afraid to speak her mind – especially when it comes to how stupid some people can be around a blind person like her. The only topic to avoid is how Parker feels about the boy who broke her heart in eighth grade…who has just transferred to her school. And as long as she can keep giving herself gold stars for every day she hasn’t cried since her dad’s death three months ago, she’ll be just fine. Right?

 

Photo May 25, 8 12 04 PMSoundless by Richelle Mead (Pengiun Young Readers, 11/10/15, ages 12 & up)

Fei is from a village where there is no sound. When suddenly the villagers begin to lose their sight and their source of food, Fei, who can suddenly hear, has to save her village from darkness and starvation.  read more…

Printz Award and Honor Read-a-Likes

2015 May 27
by Emily Childress-Campbell
  • Email
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Plus
  • LinkedIn
  • Pinterest
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • RSS

This year’s Printz Award and Printz Honor books are all quite unique: man-eating bugs, Irish romance, artistic twins and more! It can be hard to find books that are similar, but if you are enjoying reading the winners for the Hub Challenge and want to hold on to the feeling of a particular book, read on and give these read-a-likes a try.

Printz Honor: The Carnival at Bray by Jessie Ann Foley The Carnival at Bray2015 Top Ten Best Fiction for Young Adults,2015 Morris Award Finalist

Maggie Lynch is navigating a new life in Ireland. In the midst of dealing with family struggles, boys, and tentative friendships, she is shocked by the death of her beloved Uncle Kevin who introduced her to the music of Kurt Kobain and the grunge movement. When Kevin leaves her two concert tickets to see Nirvana she makes it her mission to come through for her uncle and ends up learning about herself along the way.

Read-a-Like: Five Flavors of Dumb by Antony John 2013 Popular Paperbacks for Young Adults,2011 Schneider Family Book Award

In Five Flavors of Dumb, as in The Carnival at Bray music drives the plot, but comes to stand for much more. Piper, whose parents decided to spend her college fund on her baby sister’s cochlear implant, is also struggling through some tense family situations. Like Maggie, music becomes a means of escaping the ordinary when Dumb, her high school’s rock band, hires Piper as their manager. Though Piper is deaf and unable to hear Dumb’s music, she grows to love rock music through reading biographies of Kurt Kobain and Jimi Hendrix, and getting caught up in the energy and adrenaline of recording studio and concerts. Readers who enjoyed viewing Maggie’s road to self discovery through the lens of music will love watching Piper come into her own. read more…

YA Book Personality Test

2015 May 26
  • Email
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Plus
  • LinkedIn
  • Pinterest
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • RSS
Palm Reader

Palm Reader

Forget the Tarot cards, crystal balls, and palm-readers. Toss aside those stale fortune cookies.  You need only look to  your bookshelf to understand your deepest personality traits.  Look for some of your favorite YA titles below and you may find that my keen “psychic” abilities can be enlightening.

Vanishing Girls

Vanishing Girls

* Vanishing Girls by Lauren Oliver.  There is more to you than meets the eye.  You keep your secrets close, and may not be very trustworthy.  But you love deeply and are very protective.

* Love is the Drug by Alaya Dawn Johnson. You might have a hard time trusting yourself, but go with your instincts- they won’t steer you wrong. Be yourself and don’t try so hard to please others.

Game of Love and Death

Game of Love and Death

* The Game of Love and Death by Martha Brockenbrough. You may feel like you are being influenced by forces greater than your own. But it’s OK, go with it. Don’t be afraid to get hurt and great things will happen.

* Sea of Shadows by Kelley Armstrong. Others may call you inconsistent. Your horoscope sign may be best described as “Gemini.” You are brave, smart, and have a keen sense of justice. You develop strong connections to friends and family.

Knife of Never Letting Go

The Knife of Never Letting Go

* The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness (2009 Best Book for Young Adults). Some would call you are a guys’ guy. But don’t discount the fairer sex, you may find a wonderful friend. You may not be “book smart” but you are clever and can get yourself out of tough situations. Just believe in yourself, and don’t forget to appreciate your dog.

* All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven. You are drawn to those in pain and have some dark times. Talking through it may help.  We all have to go through difficult times.  Let yourself mourn those you have lost.  read more…

Your Summer Reads Focus on Mental Health Awareness

2015 May 26
  • Email
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Plus
  • LinkedIn
  • Pinterest
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • RSS
 mental_health_awareness_month2015May is recognized as Mental Health Awareness Month. In recognition of mental health awareness, I have chosen to highlight some young adult novels published this year that focus on characters dealing with difficult and sensitive topics.  

From relationship struggles to depression and suicide, characters in these stories
 challenged by internal and external conflicts, similar to real life experiences you may be familiar with. You may have felt sympathy for Cadence and her struggling memory in We Were Liars, begged Leonard to put down the gun in Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock, connected with Charlie in The Perks of Being a Wallflower, agonized with Melinda to Speak, set out Looking for Alaska, or unraveled the mystery of the 13 Reasons Why Hannah committed suicide. Teens may experience tough and complex issues, and it shows in the contemporary stories we read.  
Recent Titles about Mental Illness 

What’s next on your reading list? 2015 brings an array of new titles related to mental illness – stories to 
place on your summer booklist (while remembering to pack a box of tissues).

 

all the bright placesAll the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven 
Violet Markey and Theodore Finch have one thing in common: they both want to leave. Violet wants to leave her Indiana town after graduation with the memory of her buried sister. Finch wants to leave this world, imagining the ways he might kill himself. After meeting on the ledge of a bell tower at school, they resolve to discover more about their world. Embracing life instead of death, Finch learns he is more than the freak he’s known as. They both learn to start living instead of dying. Elle Fanning stars in the upcoming motion picture. 

Elena Vanishing
 by Elena Dunkle, Clare B. Dunkle 
Every day, seventeen-year-old Elena is vanishing, as heranxiety and anorexia slowly steal away pieces of herselfAuthor Elena Dunkle bravely shares her story of struggling with a frightening and devastating disease as a teenager in this memoir co-written with her mother, Clare B. Dunkle. In this honest and intense telling, Elena describes what it’s like to live with anorexia and provides insight to a reality true for many.    

The Pause
 by John Larkin
Even as he seemingly has everything – loving family, friends, girlfriend – Declan makes a decision to end his life. Something in his past won’t go away and claws at his consciousness with brutal, buried scrapes, agonizing him for so long. In one moment, one pause before he jumps into an approaching train, Declan sees two versions of his life. One version where his body is destroyed and his loved ones are left behind, and another. One new life. 

read more…

The Glorious 25th of May & Terry Pratchett

2015 May 25
by Geri Diorio
  • Email
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Plus
  • LinkedIn
  • Pinterest
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • RSS
Lilacs

Photo by Flickr user Glenn Kraeck

It is the “Glorious 25th of May” and if you are a fan of the late Sir Terry Pratchett’s Discworld series, you no doubt understand what that means. If you have yet to discover the joys of the Disc, please let me explain. Sir Terry wrote 40 books set on the Discworld, a flat disc that is set on the backs of four elephants who stand on the back of a great turtle who is traveling through space. Ostensibly fantasy novels, they actually skewer both common genre tropes and human foibles. In Night Watch, a Discworld book featuring the city watch (think policemen), citizens rise up in a revolution and later, survivors of the People’s Revolution gather each year on May 25th to remember their fallen brethren while wearing lilac blooms on their lapels. After it was announced in 2007 that Sir Terry had Alzheimer’s, his fans started to honor him each May 25th by wearing lilacs. With his death on March 12 of this year, this Glorious 25th of May is an enormously bittersweet day.  read more…

The Monday Poll: Most Eye-Opening Book About War

2015 May 25
by Allison Tran
  • Email
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Plus
  • LinkedIn
  • Pinterest
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • RSS

monday_pollGood morning, Hub readers!

Last week, we asked about your favorite YA title featuring a band or singer. KL Going’s Fat Kid Rules the World tied with Robin Benway’s Audrey, Wait!, both taking in exactly 26% of the vote.  You can see detailed results for all of our previous polls in the Polls Archive. Thanks to all of you who voted and commented last week!

Today, the United States observes Memorial Day, in which we remember those who died serving our country. In honor of this important day, please tell us which title you think is the most eye-opening YA book about war. Choose from the options below, or suggest another in the comments.

What's the most eye-opening YA book about war?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

2015 Hub Reading Challenge Check-In #15

2015 May 24
by Geri Diorio
  • Email
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Plus
  • LinkedIn
  • Pinterest
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • RSS

Not signed up for YALSA’s 2015 Hub Reading Challenge? Read the official rules and sign up on the original post.  Anything you’ve read since February 9 counts, so sign up now!

2015_reading_challenge_logo
Each week in these challenge check-ins, the Hub has encouraged you to use the hashtag #hubchallenge when you post about your progress on social media. There are only four weeks left in the challenge, and if you are heading into this home stretch and need some encouragement or fresh ideas to keep you reading, may I suggest perusing that hashtag? Even if you are not a Twitter user, you can Google “Twitter” and “#hubchallenge” to see what people have been talking about .

  • @hari_vert #hubchallenge #10 gabi a girl in pieces, by isabel quintero. now _this_ is what high school summer reading should be like.
  • @bobcatlibrarian Loved Through the Woods! So very Poe-esque and, dare I say, it had some POEtic moments. #hubchallenge
  • @Ms_Librarian_ “The text. I bet he calls it the text.” My favorite line so far in Five, Six, Seven, Nate. #hubchallenge #audiobook @TimFederle
  • @cavecibum I’ve reached the point in the #hubchallenge where I want to read what I want now, but I find completing the challenge very rewarding too.
  • @teenlibrarian1 #hubchallenge #5 Laughing at My Nightmare by Shane Burcaw is done! I laughed out loud so many times reading this book.
  • @kellylynnin I might have to call in sick tomorrow…#hubchallenge #readathon

After looking over all these tweets, I have not only gotten some good ideas about which books to read next (some of their tweets opened my eyes to books I never would have considered!), but now I also have some new people to follow on Twitter! These are my kind of people – passionate readers with strong opinions and interesting views.

Have you been checking out the hashtag#hubchallenge? Discovered any good tweets? Please share them in the comments, after you let us know your progress on the challenge. If you are on Goodreads, won’t you please join the 2015 Goodreads Hub Reading Challenge group.  You have until 11:59 PM EST on June 21st to finish at least 25 books from the official list, and if you participated in the Morris/Nonfiction Reading Challenge this year, you can count the books that you read for that challenge for this challenge as well.  2015 reading challenge logo - participantDon’t forget to post the Participant’s Badge on your blog, website, or email signature, and if you have any questions or problems, please let us know in the comments or via email.

If you have already completed the challenge by reading or listening to 25 titles from the list of eligible books, be sure to fill out the form below so we can send you your Challenge Finisher badge, get in touch to coordinate your reader’s response and, perhaps best of all, to notify you if you win our exciting grand prize drawing! Be sure to use an email you check frequently and do not fill out this form until you have completed the challenge by reading 25 titles.  read more…

Tweets of the Week: May 22

2015 May 22
tags:
by Allison Tran
  • Email
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Plus
  • LinkedIn
  • Pinterest
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • RSS

tweets of the week | the hubBooks & Reading

read more…