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Jukebooks: Little Blue Lies by Chris Lynch

2014 September 17
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Little Blue Lies by Chris LynchWhen a relationship is built on lies, can it ever be true love? In Little Blue Lies by Chris Lynch, Oliver is proud to be a liar, and thrilled to find a lying soul mate in Junie Blue. Then Junie suddenly dumps him. Oliver desperately believes that they can be together, but how can he understand what went wrong when it was all a bunch of lies? 

Junie lives in a neighborhood controlled by a Mafia boss, known as One Who Knows. Oliver learns through unreliable sources that Junie has a winning lottery ticket, and that One Who Knows expects such a ticket to be turned over to him. Naively, Oliver thinks that he can use his family’s considerable wealth to rescue Junie and win her back.

Lyrics in the song, “Little Blue Lies” by The Stranglers also summon the image of a formidable kingpin.

Mr. Big is on the level
He’s no square
His magic number make our trouble disappear

The Stranglers is a British band that has been around since 1974 – and is still touring today. Their early sound was described by band member JJ Burnel as “…punk plus and then some.” (http://tinyurl.com/l7y6tsu) ”Little Blue Lies” was released in 1995, after founding band member Hugh Cornwell quit the band. Still, the energy and technical polish of the band remained evident.

-Diane Colson, currently reading Talon (advanced reader’s copy) by Julia Kagawa

From Print to Screen, Upcoming Movies from YA Books

2014 September 16
by Geri Diorio
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The popularity of YA literature is undeniable. One piece of proof: the amount of YA novels being optioned for movies. One other, possibly stronger piece of proof: how many of those options actually make it to the silver screen. This year alone we’ve had Divergent, The Fault in Our Stars, and If I Stay. The next few months will bring even more adaptations. Be sure you read the books first!

 

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The Maze Runner by James Dashner / The Maze Runner movie opens on September 19 (this Friday!)
Thomas wakes up with no memories other than his name. In that regard, he’s like all the other boys in the glade, the garden area in the middle of the maze. No one has ever made it out of the glade, no one has ever gotten through the maze. But soon a girl arrives, the first girl ever to be there, and she remembers more than her name. She remembers things that are terrifying.

 

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Dracula by Bram Stoker / Dracula Untold opens October 10
Everyone thinks they know vampires now. But Bram Stoker’s original version of the monster is very different from the glamorous, glittery vampires of the twenty first century. In 1897, a vampire was a terrifying creature of enormous power who not only killed humans for their blood, but could damn their souls to hell. And it is all told in quite a modern-seeming epistolary style.

 

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The Best of Me by Nicholas Sparks / The Best of Me movie opens October 17
High schools loves from opposite sides of the tracks grow apart after graduation. More than two decades later, they both go home to their small Southern town for the funeral of a man who was a mentor to both of them. This meeting brings out memories and feelings neither one has dealt with in years.

 

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Where Rainbows End by Cecelia Ahern / Love, Rosie movie opens October 24
Alex and Rosie have been there for each other from childhood through turbulent adolescence. There has always been a connection, although maybe not always a romantic one. When Alex’s family moves to America, and the inseparable duo look to become separate, how will they cope after spending their entire lives together? read more…

New and Forthcoming LGBTQ Young Adult Fiction

2014 September 15
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This summer, The Hub did a round up of Speculative LGBTQ fiction and highlighted other notable LGBTQ young adult novels. If you’ve worked your way through those lists and are looking for more LGBTQ fiction, you’re in luck! This post is highlighting teen fiction that features lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and otherwise non-heterosexual identifying characters and themes that are coming out in Fall 2014 and Winter 2015.

In some of these novels, the sexual orientation and gender identity are integral to the plot, and in others, it’s just another characteristic of the protagonist. There’s a great mix of genres and styles so that any reader can find a book they’ll enjoy. With titles from debut authors as well as those firmly established in the YA world, it’s great to see such an eclectic assortment of titles.

New LGBTQ YA Fiction FallWinter 2014-2015 read more…

The Monday Poll: Your Most Anticipated Fall Standalone Title

2014 September 15
by Allison Tran
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photo by flickr user JustyCinMD

Good morning, Hub readers!

Last week, we asked you to choose your favorite librarian from YA lit in celebration of Library Card Sign-up Month. The results were fairly evenly divided: Lirael from Lirael by Garth Nix came out on top with 28% of the vote, followed closely by Marian from the Beautiful Creatures series by Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl with 23%. Princess Cimorene from Patricia Wrede’s Enchanted Forest Chronicles took third place with 18% of the vote, because who doesn’t love a princess librarian? You can see detailed results for all of our previous polls in the Polls Archive. Thanks to all of you who voted!

This week, Fall is in the air (well, sort of– it’s 100 degrees here in Southern California!) and we want to know which upcoming standalone YA title you’re most looking forward to this season. Lots of us love series, but some complain of sequel fatigue and are aching to find a good book that stands on its own. Luckily, even though series remain popular in YA, there are lots of good standalone titles to choose from! Vote in the poll below, or be sure to add your choice in the comments if we missed it.

Which standalone title are you most looking forward to reading this Fall?

View Results

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Tweets of the Week: September 12th

2014 September 12
by Hannah Gómez
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How was your week? Lots happened online. Take a look!

tweets of the week | the hub

Books/Reading

Back to (Realistic, but Fictional) School

2014 September 12
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School Room by Rob Shenk

School Room by Rob Shenk

It’s getting to be that time of year; the temperatures are falling, the edges of the leaves are crisping, football is revving up, baseball is winding down, and many of us are getting used to new teachers and new classes.

To help take the sting out of the end of summer (goodbye till next year, reading on the beach with an iced tea…), I like to throw myself into celebrating the beginning of fall (hello again, curling up in an armchair with a hot chocolate while the rain falls outside!). For me, this means: new notebooks, adding apples to pretty much every meal, and diving into books that highlight all the little rituals of the school year. The following are some of my favorite titles with strong school settings, to help us all get excited for the new semester (even if we can’t actually enroll at Hogwarts, which would, let’s be honest, be the ultimate in back-to-school excitement).

Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks

The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks

The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks by E. Lockhart

Frankie is really smart (and unaccustomed to hiding her smarts in front of guys, even though sometimes they seem more comfortable if she does), dislikes accepting the status quo, is impatient with her dad’s secretive pride about his own halcyon days at her boarding school, and is (maybe) on the path to becoming a criminal mastermind- an idea she finds morally…ambiguous. A 2009 Printz Honor Book, Teens Top Ten pick, and National Book Award finalist, plus a 2013 Popular Paperbacks for Young Adults title, this is one of those books I’m always bothering everyone I know to read.

Never Let Me Go

Never Let Me Go

Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro

Speculative fiction disguised as a coming-of-age story, Never Let Me Go was an Alex Award winner in 2006, and has quickly become a modern classic. Following a trio of students through their years at a seemingly traditional boarding school, Never Let Me Go is about the complex hierarchies and subtle competitions between friends, but it’s also about how to get the truth from adults, and how to live with truths that are shockingly, fundamentally painful to process. read more…

Thirty Years at the Inn of the Last Home: Celebrating Dragonlance

2014 September 11
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Margaret Weis, Tracy Hickman, Laura Hickman, and Larry Elmore at the 2014 Salt Lake Comic Con. Photo courtesy of Margaret Weis.

Margaret Weis, Tracy Hickman, Laura Hickman, and Larry Elmore at the 2014 Salt Lake Comic Con. Photo courtesy of Margaret Weis.

This past weekend I spent the vastly better part of three days at the truly outrageous 2014 Salt Lake Comic Con (more on that in another post) and one of the highlights, for me, was the Dragonlance 30th Anniversary Celebration panel, featuring Tracy and Laura Hickman, Margaret Weis, and artist Larry Elmore.

Along with a couple hundred other guests, I was treated to stories about the genesis and development of Dragonlance, a series of gaming modules and fantasy novels first published in the mid-1980s that became one of the most popular shared world settings of all time.  Tracy and Laura provided the show and tell, sharing their original draft of the gaming modules, TSR press releases and calendars, and collection of published manuals, while all four guests contributed to an awesome historical slideshow that featured an impressive array of questionable ’80s fashion, some awesome Dragonlance art, and a rare glimpse into the working environment that produced both Dungeons & Dragons and the Dragonlance franchise. read more…

YALSA YA Lit Symposium – Why Should You Attend?

2014 September 11
by Geri Diorio
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Are you going to YALSA’s YA Literature Symposium this November? Early Bird registration is open until September 15, so register now and join us in Austin! If you’ve never been to a YA Lit Symposium, you might be wondering what it’s all about. Leading up this year’s Symposium, we’ll be featuring interviews with Symposium attendees past and present to give you a picture of why you should attend and what to expect.

Our first interview is with Gretchen Kolderup, Manager for Young Adult Education & Engagement at the New York Public Library, member of YALSA’s Board of Directors, and previous Hub Manager. She attended YALSA’s YA Lit Symposium in 2010 and 2012.

Share your #1 tip for getting the most out of the Symposium for a first-time attendee.

Make friends! This is true of every conference, but it’s extra-easy and extra-rewarding here since everyone at the Symposium cares about the same thing (teens and their literature) and all of the scheduled events are at the hotel where everyone is staying — it’s like sleepaway camp for YA librarians! Meeting new people at the conference gives you someone to sit with, chat with, and go out to dinner with that weekend — but it also builds a professional connection that you’ll use to keep learning and growing long after you leave Austin! Most of my “best friends” in the YA library world are people I met at the Symposium.

Why do you think someone should attend the Symposium?

Because it’s both useful and fun. Where else do you get to really dig in to teen literature in meaningful ways with hundreds of other fans and the authors themselves over a weekend? You’ll learn a lot; have a great time; and go home with new ideas, more developed expertise, and lots of connections to authors, resources, and other librarians to help you keep learning, growing, and reveling in the best that YA lit has to offer! read more…

Notes From a Teens’ Top Ten Book Group Participant: An All-Time Favorite Series

2014 September 10
by Guest Blogger
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Voting is open for YALSA’s 2014 Teens’ Top Ten book list- a “teen choice” list where teens nominate and choose their favorite books of the previous year. Readers ages twelve to eighteen will vote between August 15 and Teen Read Week, and the top ten titles will be announced on October 20.

Books are nominated by members of Teens’ Top Ten book groups in school and public libraries around the country, and to add to the excitement surrounding this much-anticipated book list, we’re featuring posts from these teens here on The Hub.

First up, here’s Kara Lavery from Bookhype at the Perry Public Library/Perry High School in Arizona, weighing in on Jennifer A. Nielsen’s Ascendance Trilogy:

The Ascendance Trilogy- The False Prince, The Runaway King, and The Shadow Throne- has to be one of my all-time favorite series!  The most recent book was written this last year in 2014.  The author, Jennifer A. Nielsen, did a fantastic job creating an air of mystery and humor.  With its biting sarcasm and the jaw dropping twists, I felt compelled to read more- to keep flipping the pages from the beginning of The False Prince (one of last year’s Teens’ Top Ten winners) to the end of the The Shadow Throne.

I like rollercoasters.  They’re fast, and the twists and turns are unexpected.  The flips and drops make my stomach flip.  It’s exhilarating!  The Ascendance Trilogy has the unique quality of making you feel like you’re on a rollercoaster- twisting your stomach to match the flow of the story.

The storyline is well developed and the characters are like my friends.  I was practically dying of laughter because the main character is such a smart-aleck and just an over-all devilish kind of character.  The dialogue is witty and the writing style is smooth and exciting.  You can’t just read a chapter here and there.  I mean, you could try, but you’ll end up reading half of a book before you could blink.

Unlike many other cover ideas out there, these covers aren’t cheesy or painful to look at.  It’s not that they’re pretty, but they have meaning.  I love that after you read each book, you can understand why each item on the cover is broken.

Along the lines of The Hunger Games and The Maze Runner, I would suggest this book to anyone and everyone.  If you love action, adventure, surprises, and a subtle taste of romance, you will love these books!

-Kara Lavery, currently reading Welcome to the Dark House by Laurie Faria Stolarz

Jukebooks: Sinner by Maggie Stiefvater

2014 September 10
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SinnerCole St. Clair is returning to a Los Angeles and a life of rock star glory, but it will all be for nothing if he can’t find the infuriating Isabel, a girl he cannot live without. Cole is not an easy person; he is, in his own words, “…a performer, a singer, a werewolf, a sinner.” Isabel wants to believe in Cole’s love, but doubt hardens her heart. When these two thunderclouds collide, expect a spectacular storm of a relationship.

Readers were introduced to Cole and Isabel in the second book of The Wolves of Mercy Falls series, Linger. This book is all about them.

Maggie Stievfater compiled a playlist of the songs she listened to while writing Sinner.  You can find the whole list here: https://soundcloud.com/maggie_stiefvater/sets/whitepantsnovel  My favorite is “Unkinder (A Tougher Love)” by Thumpers. It’s a very hip kaleidoscope of sound, combined with video effects that are both nostalgic and surreal. Very L.A.

-Diane Colson, currently reading Dirty Little Secret by Jennifer Echols