Skip to content

Pining for Pinterest

2012 November 12
  • Email
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Plus
  • LinkedIn
  • Pinterest
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • RSS

It might be my inner hipster, but I am always looking for the next new thing. I love to scour websites, troll blogs, and roam around in the library hoping something new will strike my fancy. As a self-confessed book cover judger, displays of jacket art and themed book displays make my mental taste buds water. Imagine my delight when I realized that Pinterest, in addition to having loads of other content, is a veritable smorgasbord of fiction suggestions to please my YA palate.

From Pinterest’s about page:

What is Pinterest?

Pinterest is a virtual pinboard. Pinterest allows you to organize and share all the beautiful things you find on the web. You can browse boards created by other people to discover new things and get inspiration from people who share your interests.

Pinterest has many features that allow for productive browsing time; some features even allow you to track a favorite pinner. This means once you have a user name and password, you can follow people with similar interests and see new titles they add to their pin boards. People, libraries, and book clubs can all have profiles on Pinterest. Once signed in, a pinner creates boards as broad as Books or as detailed as Sci-fi, Dystopian, & Steampunk for Teens. (The latter is a board provided by Somers Library of Somers, NY, as part of 113 boards with over 5,000 pins on a variety of literary topics. Not all the boards they create are about Young Adult fiction, of course, since they have other patrons to inspire. You can choose to follow the whole library or just a few of the boards that focus on themes you like.)

As a fan of an author’s work you can follow their page, boards, and pins for the latest news. Many teen authors use Pinterest to reach their audience; YA Highway has a compiled list. Author Kami Garcia has a wonderfully diverse page that introduces you to her books, news, and creative influences. Designed to encourage you to read her books or to love her books even more if you are already a fan, boards like Abandoned or Places to Dream About really help set the stage for Kami Garcia’s unique perspective. I’m definitely a visual learner, so these boards pull together scenery and details from novels in an irresistible manner.

For a really broad browse you can keep track of a whole publisher. Scholastic offers boards like Dystopian Pick and The Harry Potter Reading Club. An offshoot of Scholastic is their ThisisTeen Scholastic profile that keeps track of new releases by month. They also have a read-alike page for The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins, Do You Hunger For More? HarperTeen maintains 34 boards on a wide variety of themes that will help guide your reading choices and expand your literary horizons. Fin Fashion promises “Fashion inspired by mermaids and the Fins series by Tera Lynn Childs.” Random House has a wide variety of book-themed boards to mosey through like Books That Should Be Movies, Books That Make Us Cry, and What Would Jane Austen Do?

As you peruse Pinterest, you may see book suggestions you’ve already read; you can pin those to a board of your very own. You could also keep a list of rainy day titles so you are never bereft of fiction. Pinterest is delightfully adaptable to however you like to search. You can be specific or vague. You can look up books, subjects, and anything related to the world of libraries. Personally, I keep a whole board of cute little dinosaurs — Pinterest can be a useful tool or a mindless escape depending on how you use it.

— Laura C. Perenic, currently reading The Infects by Sean Beaudoin
(Find other books like his on the Books for Guys board by PCL Teens of  Pflugerville Community Library, TX.)

Share and enjoy

  • Email
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Plus
  • LinkedIn
  • Pinterest
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • RSS

Comments are closed.

Email
Pinterest