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Fact + Fiction = Fantastic: Fiction Readalikes for Bomb by Steve Sheinkin

2012 December 14
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Bomb: The Race to Build — and Steal — the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon by Steve Sheinkin is one of the finalists for the 2013 YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults. If you’ve already read Bomb and are finding yourself wanting more, you may also enjoy these fictional stories with similar themes, subjects, and elements. Read and liked a bunch of these novels already? Give Bomb a try!

(Summaries from jacket copy.)

Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein
I have two weeks. You’ll shoot me at the end no matter what I do.

That’s what you do to enemy agents. It’s what we do to enemy agents. But I look at all the dark and twisted roads ahead and cooperation is the easy way out. Possibly the only way out for a girl caught red-handed doing dirty work like mine — and I will do anything, anything, to avoid SS-Hauptsturmführer von Linden interrogating me again.

He has said that I can have as much paper as I need. All I have to do is cough up everything I can remember about the British War Effort. And I’m going to. But the story of how I came to be here starts with my friend Maddie. She is the pilot who flew me into France — an Allied Invasion of Two.

We are a sensational team.

Silverfin: A James Bond Adventure by Charlie Higson
This thrilling prequel to the James Bond dynasty shows young James at boarding school at Eton in the 1930′s, where he spent his formative years. Acclaimed British writer Charlie Higson, with the Ian Fleming Estate, writes an edge-of-your seat thriller that brilliantly plants the seeds to show how young James learns the skills that will eventually make him history’s most formidable and suave super spy.

The Auslander by Paul Dowswell
When Peter’s parents are killed, he is sent to an orphanage in Warsaw, Poland. But Peter is Volksdeutscher — of German blood. With his blond hair and blue eyes, he looks just like the boy on the Hitler Youth poster. The Nazis decide he is racially valuable. Indeed, a prominent German family is pleased to adopt such a fine Aryan specimen into their household. But despite his new “family,” Peter feels like a foreigner — an ausländer — and he is forming his own ideas about what he sees and what he’s told. He doesn’t want to be a Nazi. So he takes a risk-the most dangerous one he could possibly choose in 1942 Berlin …

The Gadget by Paul Zindel
Near the end of World War II, scientists in Los Alamos, New Mexico, are working on a project that will alter the fate of the world. Thirteen-year-old Stephen Orr is living at a top secret military base with his father who is a leading physicist building the atomic bomb. Stephen realizes the dangers involved when one of the scientists becomes hospitalized as a result of working with the project. The scientist alerts him to disasters that could come from The Gadget. Stephen feels it is up to him and his friend Tilanov to find the answers that lie behind this veil of secrecy.

– Compiled by members of the 2013 YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults committee

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