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Our YA Lit Resolutions for 2014

2013 December 31
by Allison Tran
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Happy New Year - image created by Allison Tran for The HubAre you making resolutions for 2014? We here at The Hub have a tradition of making New Year’s resolutions about our reading habits (see last year’s post). Here are our reading resolutions for the coming year– and we’d love it if you share yours in the comments!

  • Alegria Barclay: My New Year’s Resolution is to read more non-fiction as it is admittedly my least-favorite genre.  I find myself too often at a loss when asked for recommendation so my goal is to read one non-fiction book for every four fiction books I read.
  • Laura Perenic: For 2014 I resolve to be more generous with the literary wealth I have been afforded by my public library.  I continually take for the granted that since my library is lush with materials that all other libraries are outfitted similarly. Normally I would have all my book club books cataloged for my library; however, starting in 2014 I will donate my books to a school library.
  • Jessica Miller: My reading resolution for 2014 is to finally read the books I’ve purchased on my Nook and let sit forever in favor of reading more and more new releases from the library. Time to clear off the virtual to-be-read bookshelf!!
  • Jennifer Rummel: I’m hoping to read more books that have been sitting on my bookshelf awaiting their turn, but have been overlooked. I’m hoping to be a better library patron – not hoarding books and returning them on time. I’m hoping to contact authors of books I loved and tell them that I loved their books. Plus, I want to continue reading across ages/genres – which helps me greatly for readers’ advisory at the library.
  • Katie Shanahan Yu: My resolution this year is to start reading manga and superhero graphic novels. I love all of the comic book movies, so I feel like I should really know more about the literature. I would also like to start reviewing (instead of just rating) more books on my Goodreads account, so I remember more about the strengths of each book that I have read. I read so many that sometimes it’s hard to keep track of them all!
  • Anna Dalin: One of my YA lit resolutions for 2014 is to read more adult books with the potential to be good recommendations for teens, as many of my teen patrons seek out adult novels.  I also plan to read some YA horror.  I have generally avoided horror due to my active imagination, but I did manage to read a tween ghost story this year and lived to tell the tale.  So, onward into the spookiness!
  • Jessica Lind: In 2014, I want to read at least one book per month that I discovered exclusively through The Hub. My 2013 reading resolution was to read a wider variety of books.  I would like to continue that next year and The Hub is the perfect place to help: there are so many great titles here from so many different types of readers.
  • Mia Cabana: I’ve noticed over the past few years that I’ve stopped reading magazine articles that aren’t part of free online content. I miss leafing through the pages of a real magazine, and I also miss the content I could be getting through digital subscriptions. This year I resolve to support online subscriptions so I can sink my teeth into all the content– and maybe indulge in a good old-fashioned paper magazine every now and then, too.
  • Hannah Gómez: My resolution is to re-resolve the ones I made to myself last year and didn’t keep! I’m trying not to start reading any new series (unless all installments are already published), to read more books by/about people of color, and to read more books published for adults. I also have the new resolution of trying to write more book reviews and analyses on my blog, because too often the books I read fly right out of my head if I don’t write down my thoughts while I’m reading them!
  • Amanda Margis: For the last two years I’ve said I was going to finish reading every Printz Award and Honor book and for two years it hasn’t happened. But this year will be different. I’m halfway there (at least until the 2014 ALA Youth Media Awards are announced!) and I know I can do it! Maybe.
  • Chelsea Condren: My New Years Resolution is to expand my YA horizons more! I usually stick to genres and authors that I know and love, and sometimes shy away from romance or fantasy, for example. This quarter I’m going to take a class on YA lit and services, which I’m hoping encourages me to explore authors and titles I wouldn’t normally go for.
  • Geri Diorio: In 2014, I want to read AT LEAST a book a week. This should be possible, in 2013 I read more than 200 books, but I was on the Nutmeg Book Award High School Selection Committee, and that helped tremendously with the final book count. There were close to 100 books that I HAD to read for committee work. Left to my own devices, I will still happily read, but probably not as much. So, here, now, publicly, I am declaring that I will read at least a book a week in 2014.
  • Colleen Seisser: My resolution is to read more graphic novels and manga.  I made an effort this year, but the frequency that I read them tapered off at the end of the year.  I have also not read a lot of manga since picking up a couple of series a few years ago, and I want to try and get into some of the newer series (like, Attack on Titan).
  • Becky O’Neil: My 2014 YA lit resolution is to listen to more audiobooks. I know there are great ones out there, but I have just not committed myself to listening to very many of them! And when I check one out from the library for my car, I get too easily distracted by my favorite listening activity, music. I think I need to explore e-audiobooks and the ability to have an audiobook on my phone — in my pocket, with headphones — and with me while I walk and clean.
  • Sharon Rawlins: My YA lit resolution for 2014 is to not make as ambitious a resolution as I have in the past. I didn’t even make one for 2013 because I failed miserably at the one I made for 2012  to read all of George R. R. Martin’s Game of Thrones books. In February, I’ll be starting my year as Chair of the NF in Excellence Committee so I’ll be reading lots of YA nonfiction. In-between reading for that, my goal is to read some of the YA fiction that came out in 2012 and early 2013 that have been sitting in piles in my living room.  I resolve to read what I have so I can give them away to make room for more new ones!
  • Kelly Dickinson: Although I didn’t formally compose reading resolutions for 2013, I have a few goals in mind.  I wanted to read at least 150 books (tracked on my Goodreads account) and I wanted to read a larger number of younger middle grade novels in order to have a stronger background knowledge of the reading lives of my incoming 7th grade students.  I feel I accomplished both goals and so I’m excited to set some increasingly ambitious goals for 2014.1.)    I want to aim for 170 books read in 2014.  I met my 150 books goal in early December of this year so I think it’s possible.2.)    I want to continue reading books aimed at readers both younger and older than my students (who range from twelve to eighteen).  So I plan to sneak in even more children’s, younger middle grade, and adult fiction than ever!3.)    I want to read more nonfiction of interest to my students.  I read a fairly solid amount of nonfiction but it’s primarily professional in topic (education, reading promotion/research, etc.).  In 2014, I aim to read more biographies, memoirs, and general nonfiction appealing to teens.4.)    I also want to continue to increase my graphic novel reading and finally read some manga.  I’m still very behind in keeping up with recent releases in those formats!5.)    Finally, I’m going to borrow a resolution from fellow Hub blogger Emily Calkins and try to read at least one book a month recommended by a student.  I try to do this anyway but sometimes I get side tracked by new arrivals, personal interests, and urgent book talking priorities.  However, whenever I do read a book specifically because of a teen’s recommendation, it both improves my knowledge of my population’s interests AND provides for a great conversation opportunity with the individual teen.
  • Allison Tran: My resolution is to read more of the Alex Award winners. YA lit is my first love, and I sometimes find myself lost when I venture into the realm of adult literature. The Alex Award, which recognizes adult books with teen appeal, is the perfect way for dedicated YA lit readers to dip a toe in the waters of adult reads. I read an Alex winner for the first time this year (Where’d You Go, Bernadette by Maria Semple) and loved it. More Alex winners for me in 2014!

Thank you for reading The Hub in 2013. Have a happy new year, and we’ll look forward to more great discussions about YA lit in 2014!

-Allison Tran

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2 Responses leave one →
  1. Jessica Lind permalink
    December 31, 2013

    I love the idea of using the Alex Award winners as a resource for finding great adult materials. Where’s You Go, Bernadette became my go-to recommendation for adults this year and it would be great to have a few more up my sleeve that are good for teens and adults.

  2. MindyE permalink
    January 1, 2014

    Thank you to Laura! As a high school librarian with a puny budget, I am very thankful for anyone who donates great books!

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