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Jukebooks: More Than Good Enough by Crissa-Jean Chappell

2014 March 5
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More Than Good Enough by Crissa-Jean ChappellTrent’s insecurities are pulling him into a deep funk. He’s cut so much school that his grades are shot. He’s lost his hot girlfriend. Trent just doesn’t feel like he belongs anywhere, not with his British-born mom, and not with his father, a member of the Mikasuki Indian tribe.  When parents decide that Trent should go live with his father at the Rez in the Everglades, Trent’s anger and self-loathing increase. The one thing he still has, however, is music.

Trent can identify with Jimi Hendrix, who was part Cherokee. He feels as if, “…his rage channeled into my hands.” Few know of Trent’s musical expertise, especially that he can compose music worthy of Hendrix comparisons.

Most teens today have heard of Hendrix, either because of his guitar wizardry or because of his tragic death at 27. A smaller number understand that Hendrix created sounds on the guitar that had never been heard before. Below is Bob Dylan’s All Along the Waterfront, which Hendrix recorded in 1968. It’s mentioned by Trent in More Than Good Enough, and stands as an excellent example of Hendrix’s instrumental prowess.

-Diane Colson, currently reading an advanced reader’s copy of In Praise of Hatred by Khaled Khalifa

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One Response leave one →
  1. March 5, 2014

    Reading MORE THAN GOOD ENOUGH with my background and expertise in representations of Native people, I found the novel sorely lacking.

    Information specific to Native people was inserted w/o sufficient development of context for that information to be included. As such, it is decoration that makes the book seem like it is about Native people, but it doesn’t deliver. It meets mainstream expectations of what Native people are like, but that expectation is characterized by long-held stereotypical ideas of who we are. I do not recommend it.

    –Debbie Reese, American Indians in Children’s Literature

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