Skip to content

It’s Not Just About Banned Books: Self-Censorship and Library Collections

It’s Banned Books Week! That time of year when we are all encouraged to discuss the importance of intellectual freedom and the problem with banning books. 2015 is not without its share of book challenges and bans making it into the news. For a few examples check out these articles on Ted Dawe’s Into the River, Rebecca Skloot’s The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, or Mark Haddon’s The Curious Incident of a Dog in the Nighttime.Banned Books Week 2015

While news articles like these are a great place to start talking about book banning, there’s another kind of censorship I want to encourage us all to think about – self censorship. A simple search will pull up a number of interesting studies and articles on the subject, especially Debra Lau Whelen’s 2009 survey for School Library Journal and the accompanying article “A Dirty Little Secret: Self-Censorship.”

This Banned Books Week I want to challenge us all to think about self censorship in terms of our own choices, and hopefully keep it in mind as we make decisions for our library patrons throughout the year.

— Miriam Wallen, currently reading Ghosts of Heaven by Marcus Sedgwick

The following two tabs change content below.

Miriam Wallen

Miriam Wallen is a Teen Librarian at the Lawrence Public Library in Lawrence, KS.