YALSA Election: An Interview with Edwards Award Committee Candidate Jan Chapman

yalsa logoGet ready to vote! The YALSA election runs from March 19 through April 25, and to help you be an informed voter, we’re sharing interviews with each of the 2014 candidates for YALSA Award Committees.

This week we are focusing on Margaret A. Edwards Award Committee, which honors an author, as well as a specific body of his or her work, for significant and lasting contribution to young adult literature.

Candidates, who will be presented in alphabetical order, were asked to craft  “Twitter-length” responses (i.e. around 140 characters). Full biographical information on all of the candidates can be found on the sample ballot.

Today we have an interview with Jan Chapman.

Continue reading YALSA Election: An Interview with Edwards Award Committee Candidate Jan Chapman

The Monday Poll: Best Last Lines

the_endGood morning, Hub readers!

Last week, in honor of Presidents’ Day, we asked you to choose the YA lit character you’d vote into the White House. The results just go to show that smart girls rule: 28% of you would vote E. Lockhart’s Frankie Landau-Banks for president, and 26% chose Suzanne Collin’s Katniss Everdeen as their ideal presidential candidate. Good looks and charisma also count for something, as Magnus Bane from Cassandra Clare’s books came in third with 14% of your vote. You can see detailed results for all of our previous polls in the Polls Archive. Thanks to all of you who voted!

This week, we’re revisiting a topic we polled you about a long, long time ago in the bygone days of 2011: the best last lines in YA fiction. Since this is an update of a previous poll, we’re sticking with books published after that poll was issued. Vote below, or leave your suggestions in the comments!

[poll id=”137″]

Tweets of the Week: February 21

If you’ve missed anything in the YA lit world this week, this round-up of the latest Twitter happenings should get you caught up. Enjoy, and have a good weekend!

Books

Continue reading Tweets of the Week: February 21

The Monday Poll: YA Lit Characters for President!

The White House in 1846 - public domain image accessed at Wikimedia Commons Good morning, Hub readers!

Last week, we rounded out our Valentine’s Day polls by asking which romantic outcome from YA lit you’d like to change. Apparently freshly baked bread doesn’t win many hearts around here, because Suzanne Collins’ Hunger Games trilogy came in first with 34% of the vote. The Twilight saga by Stephenie Meyer followed closely with 32% of the vote, so Team Jacob is clearly still going strong. Finally, the Gemma Doyle trilogy by Libba Bray came in third with 16% of  the vote.  (Team No Tree?)  You can see detailed results for all of our previous polls in the Polls Archive. Thanks to all of you who voted and commented last week!

This week, we’re on to the next holiday– the United States is celebrating Presidents’ Day, so we want to know: which YA lit character would you vote into the Oval Office?  Your choice could be based on leadership ability, a commanding presence, admirable values, or sheer charisma. Actual qualifications don’t matter, since this is just for fun– so go nuts! Vote in the poll below, and feel free to campaign for your favorite in the comments.

[poll id=”136″]

The Monday Poll: The YA Lit Couple You’d Change

heartGood morning, Hub readers!

Last week, we wanted to know which YA lit couple you’re most hoping will make it work. Even though the end of Rainbow Rowell’s Eleanor & Park was pretty conclusive, it looks like a lot of us are still concerned about this couple’s future– we really want them to make it work! Eleanor & Park pulled in 63% of the vote. In second place was Magnus and Alec from Cassandra Clare’s Mortal Instruments series, with 12% of the vote. The final book comes out this year, so maybe we’ll get some resolution! We also received a few great suggestions in the comments last week– Shari suggested Perry and Aria from Veronica Rossi’s sci-fi/fantasy Ever Night series, and Jenni wrote in with Harry and Craig from Two Boys Kissing and Liza and Annie from Annie on My Mind. You can see detailed results for all of our previous polls in the Polls Archive. Thanks to all of you who voted and commented!

This week, we’re continuing the romance theme in honor of Valentine’s Day a little early and asking another question about YA lit couples. You may have seen the news that J.K. Rowling expressed that  Harry and Hermione may have been a more compatible couple than Ron and Hermione. Whatever you think about this belated relevation, it opens up an interesting question to ponder: what romantic pairing in YA lit would you go back and change, if you could? In the interest of avoiding spoilers, we’re going to stick to book/series titles, rather than mentioning specific couples’ names. Vote in the poll below, and tell us in the comments if we missed something!

[poll id=”135″]

YALSA’s 2014 Hub Reading Challenge Begins!

Hub Reading Challenge logoIt’s now February 3rd, so we are kicking off YALSA’s 2014 Hub Reading Challenge! We hope this challenge will encourage you to read/listen to more great books than you might have otherwise — and to discover something new in a genre or category you might not have tried.

Challenge objective Read/listen to 25 of the titles on our list of eligible titles [pdf] to finish the challenge. The list includes YA novels, audiobooks, graphic novels, and books for adults, so there’s plenty to choose from. Bonus objective: read/listen to all eligible titles to conquer the challenge!

Challenge rewards Beyond experiencing the best of the best that YA lit has to offer, everyone who finishes the challenge will be invited to submit a response to a book they read for the challenge. The response can be text, graphics, audio, video and will be published on The Hub. Furthermore, everyone who finishes the challenge will be entered into a random drawing for our grand prize: a YALSA tote bag full of 2013 and 2014 YA lit! (If the winner is a teacher or librarian or something similar, we’ll also include a few professional development titles.)

Challenge conquerors will receive an elite digital badge to show off how well-read they are. (And don’t forget major bragging rights and the undying awe and respect of everyone, everywhere.)

Continue reading YALSA’s 2014 Hub Reading Challenge Begins!

The Monday Poll: YA Lit Couple You’re Pulling For

Hearts on our mantel.
photo by flickr user PV KS

Good morning, Hub readers!

Last week, we asked you to choose the most lovable vehicle in YA lit. Arthur Weasley’s flying Ford Anglia from the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling was clearly the favorite with 64% of your vote. Gansey’s Camaro (“The Pig”) from The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater came in second with 23%, and Hub reader Lucie wrote with the suggestion of Ari’s red truck in Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saenz. You can see detailed results for all of our previous polls in the Polls Archive. Thanks to all of you who voted in the poll!

This week, we’re going to start celebrating Valentine’s Day a little early and ask you to weigh in on which couple from YA lit you’re most hoping will make it work. Whether they’re starcrossed or MFEO, these crazy kids have gotta find a way, right? Vote in the poll below, and tell us in the comments if we missed your favorite lovebirds!

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ALA Midwinter 2014: YALSA’s Morris/Nonfiction Award Program & Presentation

morris_nonfiction_program_alamw2014The morning of Monday, January 28th, at the ALA Midwinter Meeting in Philadelphia was filled with excitement. Right on the heels of the ALA Youth Media Awards came YALSA’s Morris/Nonfiction Program & Presentation, and the whole room was abuzz to celebrate this year’s finalists and winners of the William C. Morris YA Debut Award and the Award for Excellent in Nonfiction for Young Adults.

Emceed by YALSA President Shannon Peterson, the program began with the Morris Award winner and finalists, introduced by Dorcas Wong, 2014 Morris Award Committee Chair.

Sex & ViolenceCarrie Mesrobian, author of Morris finalist Sex and Violence, gave a heartfelt speech recounting the significance of libraries in her formative years. She was an avid library user during her youth, but never interacted with librarians as a teen. Despite this, she said, “No matter that I never spoke to a single librarian, the librarians kept the shelves stocked… Librarians regularly and reliably provided me with the books I needed.” And for that, she said, she is “forever grateful.”

Dr. Bird's Advice for Sad PoetsEvan Roskos, author of Morris finalist Dr. Bird’s Advice for Sad Poets, had everyone in stitches by observing that being honored for the Morris is a truly a once in a lifetime opportunity because, well… he can only debut once. He then told a story about how his book empowered a teen reader to get help for their mental health concerns. Of course, the inspiring nature of this anecdote turned to hilarity as he observed that “Dr. Bird’s Advice for Sad Poets actually caused someone to seek therapy.” He concluded by sharing his four-year-old son’s reaction to seeing his book cover. “Daddy, YOU wrote Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus?” This author is just as hilarious and thoughtful as his book. Continue reading ALA Midwinter 2014: YALSA’s Morris/Nonfiction Award Program & Presentation

Coming Soon: The 2014 Hub Reading Challenge

Hub Reading Challenge logo Get excited, YA lit enthusiasts! Now that the Youth Media Awards have been announced and the selected list committees are wrapping up their work, we are pleased to officially announce our 2014 Hub Reading Challenge!

When? The 2014 Hub Reading Challenge will begin at 12:01AM EST on Monday, February 3. Once the challenge starts, you’ll have about four months (until 11:59pm on Sunday, June 22) to read as many of the following as you possibly can:

If you participated in our Morris/Nonfiction Reading Challenge– even if you didn’t finish- you can count that reading toward your progress in The Hub Reading Challenge. Otherwise, only books that you both begin and finish within the challenge period count, so if you’ve read any of these titles before, you’ll have to re-read them to count them.

Continue reading Coming Soon: The 2014 Hub Reading Challenge

2014 Youth Media Award Winners Announced!

shutterstock_102813506 [Converted]This morning, the winners and honor books for ALA’s Youth Media Awards were announced to an elated crowd in Philadelphia during ALA’s Midwinter Meeting.

Here is the list of YA titles recognized this morning (children’s books have been omitted from this list because The Hub focuses on YA lit, but be sure to find the full list of winners on ALA’s website):

Alex Award for adult books with teen appeal

  • Brewster,  written by Mark Slouka  and published by W.W. Norton & Company
  • The Death of Bees,written by Lisa O’Donnell and published by Harper, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers
  • Golden Boy: A Novel, written by Abigail Tarttlein and published by ATRIA Books, a division of Simon & Schuster, Inc.
  • Help for the Haunted, written by John Searles and published by William Morrow, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers
  • Lexicon: A Novel, written by Max Barry and published by The Penguin Group, Penguin Group (USA) Inc.
  • Lives of Tao, written by Wesley Chu and published by Angry Robot, a member of the Osprey Group
  • Mother, Mother: A Novel, written by Koren Zailckas and published by Crown Publishers, an imprint of the Crown Publishing Group, a division of Random House, Inc.
  • Relish, written by Lucy Knisley and published by First Second, an imprint of Roaring Brook Press, a division of Holtzbrinck Publishing Holds Limited Partnership
  • The Sea of Tranquility: A Novel, written by Katja Millay and published by ATRIA Paperback, a division of Simon & Schuster, Inc.
  • The Universe Versus Alex Woods, written by Gavin Extence and published by Redhook Books, an imprint of Orbit, a division of Hachette Book Group, Inc.

Margaret A. Edwards Award for lifetime achievement in young adult literature

  • Markus Zusak

Michael L. Printz Award for excellence in young adult literature

  • Winner: Midwinter Blood,  written by Marcus Sedgwick and published by Roaring Brook Press, an imprint of Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group
  • Honor: Eleanor & Park, written by Rainbow Rowell and published by St. Martin’s Griffin (Macmillan)
  • Honor: Kingdom of Little Wounds, written by Susann Cokal and published by Candlewick Press
  • Honor: Maggot Moon, written by Sally Gardner, illustrated by Julian Crouch, and published by Candlewick Press
  • Honor: Navigating Early, written by Clare Vanderpool and published by Delacorte Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Random House LLC, Penguin Random House Company

Odyssey Award for outstanding audiobooks for young adults

  • Winner: Scowler, produced by Listening Library, an imprint of the Random House Audio Publishing Group; written by Daniel Kraus and narrated by Kirby Heyborne
  • Honor: Better Nate Than Ever, produced by Simon & Schuster Audio; written and narrated by Tim Federle
  • Honor: Eleanor & Park, produced by Listening Library; written by Rainbow Rowell and narrated by Rebecca Lowman and Sunil Malhotra

Schneider Family Book Award for an artistic expression of the disability experience

  • Teen winner: Rose Under Fire, written by Elizabeth Wein and published by Hyperion, an imprint of Disney Book Group

Stonewall Book Award for outstanding LGBTQ titles

  • Winner: Beautiful Music for Ugly Children, written by Kirstin Cronn-Mills and published by Flux, an imprint of Llewellyn Worldwide Ltd.
  • Winner: Fat Angie, written by e.E. Charlton-Trujillo and published by Candlewick Press
  • Honor: Better Nate Than Ever, written by Tim Federle and published Simon & Schuster Book for Young Readers, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division
  • Honor: Branded by the Pink Triangle, written by Ken Setterington and published by Second Story Press
  • Honor: Two Boys Kissing, written by David Levithan and published by Alfred A. Knopf, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Random House, Inc.

William C. Morris Award for outstanding debut novels

  • Winner: Charm & Strange written by Stephanie Kuehn, published by St. Martin’s Griffin, an imprint of St. Martin’s Press, a division of Macmillan.
  • Finalist: Sex & Violence written by Carrie Mesrobian, published by Carolrhoda LAB, an imprint of Lerner Publishing Group.
  • Finalist: Dr. Bird’s Advice for Sad Poets written by Evan Roskos, published by Houghton Mifflin, an imprint of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
  • Finalist: Belle Epoque written by Elizabeth Ross, published by Delacorte Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books.  
  • Finalist: In the Shadow of Blackbirds written by Cat Winters, published by Amulet Books, an imprint of ABRAMS.

YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults

  • Winner: The Nazi Hunters: How a Team of Spies and Survivors Captured the World’s Most Notorious Nazi written by Neal Bascomb, published by Arthur A. Levine Books, an imprint of Scholastic Inc.
  • Finalist: Go: A Kidd’s Guide to Graphic Design written by Chip Kidd, published by Workman Publishing Company.
  • Finalist: Imprisoned: The Betrayal of Japanese Americans During World War II written by Martin W. Sandler, published by Walker Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing, Inc.
  • Finalist: Courage Has No Color: The True Story of the Triple Nickles, America’s First Black Paratroopers written by Tanya Lee Stone, published by Candlewick Press.
  • Finalist: The President Has Been Shot! The Assassination of John F. Kennedy written by James L. Swanson, published by Scholastic Press, an imprint of Scholastic Inc.