The Monday Poll: Your Favorite Teen Superhero

monday_pollGood morning, Hub readers!

Last week, we asked you to name the YA book-to-screen adaptation you’re most looking forward to this year. Looks like most of you will be lining up for Mockingjay Part 2, which pulled in 39% of the vote. Paper Towns is also highly anticipated, with 29%. You can see detailed results for all of our previous polls in the Polls Archive. Thanks to all of you who voted!

This week, since Comic-Con 2015 registration just opened (and promptly sold out), we’ve got comics on the brain. Who’s your favorite teen superhero or heroine? Choose from the options below, or add your own suggestion in the comments!

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The Monday Poll: 2015 YA Book-to-Movie Picks

monday_pollGood morning, Hub readers!

Did you have a fun Valentine’s Day? Our poll last week was all about declarations of love in YA lit, and we asked you to choose your favorite. The top pick by far, with 54% of the vote, was from The Fault in Our Stars by John Green, a quote from Augustus to Hazel: “Oh, I wouldn’t mind, Hazel Grace. It would be a privilege to have my heart broken by you.” You can see detailed results for all of our previous polls in the Polls Archive. Thanks to all of you who voted!

This week, we want to know which YA book you’re most looking forward to seeing adapted for the big screen. Choose from the options below, or add your own suggestion in the comments!

[poll id=”188″]

YALSA’s 2015 Hub Reading Challenge Begins!

2015_reading_challenge_logoIt’s now February 9th, so it’s time to officially kick off YALSA’s 2015 Hub Reading Challenge! We hope this challenge will encourage you to read/listen to more great books than you might have otherwise — and to discover something new in a genre or category you might not have tried.

Challenge objective Read/listen to 25 of the titles on our list of eligible titles [pdf] to finish the challenge. The list includes YA novels, audiobooks, graphic novels, and books for adults, so there’s plenty to choose from. Bonus objective: read/listen to all eligible titles to conquer the challenge! [Please note: at the time of this writing, we are still awaiting the 2015 Great Graphic Novels for Teens top ten list to round out the list of Hub Challenge eligible titles. The list will be updated with that info as soon as it’s available!] 

Challenge rewards Beyond experiencing the best of the best that YA lit has to offer, everyone who finishes the challenge will be invited to submit a response to a book they read for the challenge. The response can be text, graphics, audio, video and will be published on The Hub. Furthermore, everyone who finishes the challenge will be entered into a random drawing for our grand prize: a YALSA tote bag full of 2014 and 2015 YA lit! (If the winner is a teacher or librarian or something similar, we’ll also include a few professional development titles.)

Challenge conquerors will receive an elite digital badge to show off how well-read they are. (And don’t forget major bragging rights and the undying awe and respect of everyone, everywhere.)

Continue reading YALSA’s 2015 Hub Reading Challenge Begins!

The Monday Poll: The Best Declaration of Love in YA Lit

monday_pollGood morning, Hub readers!

Last week, we kicked off our Valentine’s Day celebrations early by asking what YA romance title you would recommend to a reader who really doesn’t read romance. Topping the results list was Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins, with 39% of the vote.  Next was The Geography of You and Me by Jennifer E. Smith, with 21%, and The Truth About Forever by Sarah Dessen, with 20%. You can see detailed results for all of our previous polls in the Polls Archive. Thanks to all of you who voted!

This week, we continue the Valentine’s theme by challenging you to pick the best declaration of love in YA lit. Which one confession would capture your heart? Vote in the poll below, or add your choice in the comments! We deliberately kept this poll brief to invite your suggestions!

[poll id=”187″]

Coming Soon: The 2015 Hub Reading Challenge

2015_reading_challenge_logoGet excited, YA lit enthusiasts! Now that the Youth Media Awards have been announced and the selected list committees are wrapping up their work, we are pleased to officially announce our 2015 Hub Reading Challenge!

When? The 2015 Hub Reading Challenge will begin at 12:01AM EST on Monday, February 9. Once the challenge starts, you’ll have about four months (until 11:59pm on Sunday, June 21) to read as many of the following as you possibly can:

If you participated in our Morris/Nonfiction Reading Challenge– even if you didn’t finish- you can count that reading toward your progress in The Hub Reading Challenge. Otherwise, only books that you both begin and finish within the challenge period count, so if you’ve read any of these titles before, you’ll have to re-read them to count them.

Continue reading Coming Soon: The 2015 Hub Reading Challenge

2015 Youth Media Award Winners Announced!

shutterstock_102813506 [Converted]This morning marked one of the highlights of ALA’s Midwinter Meeting in Chicago: the winners and honor books for ALA’s Youth Media Awards were announced! It was an exciting year, with lots of surprises– including the first time a graphic novel for teens has been named a Caldecott Honor book! Too, the #WeNeedDiverseBooks movement as a whole is feeling a big win this morning, as so many of the titles recognized feature characters of color or people with disabilities.

Here is the list of YA titles recognized this morning (children’s books have been omitted from this list because The Hub focuses on YA lit, but be sure to find the full list of winners on ALA’s website):

Alex Award for adult books with teen appeal

  • All the Light We Cannot See,  written by Anthony Doerr  and published by Scribner, a division of Simon & Schuster
  • Bellweather Rhapsody, written by Kate Racculia and published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company
  • Bingo’s Run, written by James A. Levin and published by Spiegel & Grau, an imprint of the Random House Publishing Group, a division of Random House LLC, a Penguin Random House Company
  • Confessions, written by Kanae Minato, translated by Stephen Snyder, and published by Mulholland Books, an imprint of Little, Brown and Company, a division of Hachette Book Group, Inc.
  • Everything I Never Told You, written by by Celeste Ng and published by The Penguin Press, a member of Penguin Group LLC, a Penguin Random House Company
  • Lock In, written by John Scalzi, a Tor book published by Tom Doherty Associates, LLC
  • The Martian, written by Andy Weir and published by Crown Publishers, an imprint of the Crown Publishing Group, a division of Random House LLC, a Penguin Random House Company
  • The Terrorist’s Son: A Story of Choice, written by Zak Ebrahim with Jeff Giles and published by TED Books, a division of Simon & Schuster, Inc
  • Those Who Wish Me Dead, written by Michael Koryta and published by Little, Brown and Company, a division of Hachette Book Group
  • Wolf in White Van, written by John Darnielle and published by Farrar, Strauss and Giroux

Margaret A. Edwards Award for lifetime achievement in young adult literature

  • Author: Sharon M. Draper

Michael L. Printz Award for excellence in young adult literature

  • Winner: I’ll Give You the Sun, written by Jandy Nelson and published by Dial Books, an imprint of Penguin Group USA, an imprint of Penguin Random House
  • Honor: And We Stay, written by Jenny Hubbard and published by Delacorte Press, and imprint of Random House Children’s Books, a division of Random House, Inc., a Penguin Random House Company
  • Honor: The Carnival at Bray, written by Jessie Ann Foley and published by Elephant Rock Books
  • Honor: Grasshopper Jungle, written by Andrew Smith and published by Dutton Books, an imprint of Penguin Group USA, a Penguin Random House Company
  • Honor: This One Summer, illustrated by Jillian Tamaki, written by Mariko Tamaki and published by First Second

Randolph Caldecott Medal for most distinguished American picture book for children:

  • Honor: This One Summer, illustrated by Jillian Tamaki, written by Mariko Tamaki and published by First Second

Coretta Scott King (Author) Book Award recognizing an African American  author of outstanding books for children and young adults:

  • Honor: Kekla Magoon for How It Went Down, published by Henry Holt and Company, LLC

Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent Author Award:

  • When I Was the Greatest, written by Jason Reynolds and published by Atheneum Books for Young Readers, and imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division.

Odyssey Award for outstanding audiobooks for young adults

  • Honor: Five, Six, Seven, Nate! produced by AUDIOWORKS (Children’s), an imprint of Simon & Schuster Audio Division, written by Tim Federle, and narrated by Tim Federle

Schneider Family Book Award for an artistic expression of the disability experience

  • Teen winner: Girls Like Us, written by Gail Giles and published by Candlewick Press

Stonewall Book Award for outstanding LGBTQ titles

  • Honor: Beyond Magenta: Transgender Teens Speak Out, written and photographed by Susan Kuklin and published by Candlewick Press
  • Honor: I’ll Give You the Sun, written by Jandy Nelson and published by Dial Books, an imprint of Penguin Group USA, an imprint of Penguin Random House

William C. Morris Award for outstanding debut novels

  • Winner: Gabi, a Girl in Pieces, written by Isabel Quintero, published by Cinco Puntos Press
  • Finalist: The Carnival at Bray, written by Jessie Ann Foley, published by Elephant Rock Books
  • Finalist: The Story of Owen: Dragon Slayer of Trondheim, written by E.K. Johnston, published by Carolrhoda Lab™, an imprint of Carolrhoda Books, a division of Lerner Publishing Group
  • Finalist: The Scar Boys, written by Len Vlahos, published by Egmont Publishing
  • Finalist: The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender, written by Leslye Walton, published by Candlewick Press

YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults

  • Winner: Popular: Vintage Wisdom for a Modern Geek written by Maya Van Wagenen, and published by Dutton, an imprint of Penguin Young Readers Group
  • Finalist: Laughing at My Nightmare written by Shane Burcaw, and published by Roaring Brook Press, an imprint of Macmillan’s Children’s Publishing Group
  • Finalist: The Family Romanov: Murder, Rebellion & the Fall of Imperial Russia written by Candace Fleming, and published by Schwartz & Wade, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books
  • Finalist: Ida M. Tarbell: The Woman Who Challenged Big Business—and Won! written by Emily Arnold McCully, and Published by Clarion Books, an imprint of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Books for Young Readers
  • Finalist: The Port Chicago 50: Disaster, Mutiny, and the Fight for Civil Rights written by Steve Sheinkin, and published by Roaring Brook Press, an imprint of Macmillan’ Children’s Publishing Group

The Monday Poll: Romance for Non-Romance Readers

monday_pollGood morning, Hub readers!

Last week, to wrap up National Tea Month, we asked which character from YA lit could use a comforting cup of tea. Your top pick was probably the character would would appreciate tea the most: Maddie, from Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein, with 54% of the vote. Eleanor from Rainbow Rowell’s Eleanor and Park came in second with 24%. You can see detailed results for all of our previous polls in the Polls Archive. Thanks to all of you who voted!

This week, we’re celebrating the most romantic month of all (at least, according to the greeting card companies…) – it’s February, and Valentine’s Day is right around the corner? Which YA romance would you recommend to a reader who doesn’t usually go for romance? Vote in the poll below, or add your choice in the comments!

[poll id=”186″]

YALSA’s 2015 Morris/Nonfiction Reading Challenge Final Check-In

yalsa morris nonfiction sealsThis is it, readers– we’re closing in on the final hours of the 2015 Morris/Nonfiction Reading Challenge. ALA’s Youth Media Awards will be announced tomorrow morning, and our reading challenge wraps up officially at 7:45 am CST on Monday, February 2.

We hope you’ve had fun participating in this year’s challenge. How many books did you end up reading? Did any titles surprise you? Do you have any predictions for the titles that will take away the gold medals?

Remember, if you finished the Morris/Nonfiction Challenge, you have a head start on with the 2015 Hub Reading Challenge that will start the week after the Youth Media Awards. Thanks for participating, and be sure to fill out the finisher form at the end of this post if you’re all done!

-Allison Tran, currently reading Echo by Pam Munoz Ryan Continue reading YALSA’s 2015 Morris/Nonfiction Reading Challenge Final Check-In

2015 Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults: An Interview with Finalist Maya Van Wagenen

yalsa nonfiction finalistThe YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction honors the best nonfiction book published for young adults (ages 12-18) during a Nov. 1 – Oct. 31 publishing year. The award winner will be announced at the ALA Midwinter Meeting Youth Media (YMA) Awards on Monday, Feb. 2, 2015. Join us for a live webcast of the YMA Awards press conference or follow I Love Libraries on Twitter or Facebook to be among the first to know the 2015 winners. The official hashtag for the 2015 Youth Media Awards is  #ALAyma.

2015 Nonfiction Award finalist Maya Van Wagenen is being honored for her memoir Popular: Vintage Wisdom for a Modern Geek, in which she documents her unique experiences as a contemporary middle schooler seeking the secrets of social success from a 1950s popularity handbook written by former model Betty Cornell. We are so grateful to this busy young author for taking the time to chat with us about her book! 

Popular_comp9.inddIt’s so amazing that you were able to connect with THE Betty Cornell to tell her how much her book meant to you. Have you had any memorable experiences with readers who felt a deep connection with your book?
Meeting and writing to readers has been one of the highlights of this process. I get  messages from people in France, the UK, and Russia, as well as all over the United States. Something I remember distinctly happened when I was doing a signing at YALLFest, a young adult book festival in Charleston. A girl approached me with her copy of Popular. It had colored Post-it notes sticking up from half the pages, comments scrawled in the margins, and quotes highlighted and underlined. It was incredible. I’m also pen pals with a fourth grade reader who dressed up as me for Book Character Day at school. The pictures were adorable and I was beyond touched.

Continue reading 2015 Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults: An Interview with Finalist Maya Van Wagenen

The Monday Poll: January is National Tea Month

monday_pollGood morning, Hub readers!

Last week, we asked which gal from YA historical fiction is the most swoonworthy. We always knew The Hub had a smart readership: you clearly favor strong heroines like Ismae from Grave Mercy by Robin LaFevers, who ran away with 42% of the vote. Not far behind was Eleanor Douglas from Rainbow Rowell’s Eleanor and Park, with 33%. You can see detailed results for all of our previous polls in the Polls Archive. Thanks to all of you who voted!

This week, we realized we’re just in the nick of time to celebrate January as National Tea Month. Hooray! We love tea. It’s the ultimate comfort beverage. It made us think: there are a lot of characters in YA lit who could use a little comfort. Which character would you most want to pour a nice, comforting cup of tea for? Vote in the poll below, or add your choice in the comments!

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