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Author: Laura Perenic

YA Lit Dream Interpretation: Spiders

In your dream everything seems normal, its not a nightmare at all.  Then something touches your arm.  You brush it away but still persists.  Your concentration is broken so you look for the source of your distraction.  To your horror you see a giant spider.  No matter how you try you cannot brush it off your clothes. 

In a panic you wake up.  Terrified and feeling a bit like Ron Weasley who is equally terrified of spiders, you wonder “Why spiders? Why couldn’t it be “Follow the butterflies?” (IMDB)   Freud might have a lot of explanations for your dream.  But a better interpretation is: you need fiction to solve your nightmarish concerns.  No need to psychoanalyze when some reader’s advisory  has the cure.

To see a spider in your dream indicates that you are feeling like an outsider in some situation. Or perhaps you want to keep your distance and stay away from an alluring and tempting situation. (DreamMoods)

While all dreams have positive and negative connotations, this dream interpretation will focus on the good outcomes of seeing a spider in your dreams.  Spiders can represent going against the popular crowd and finding your own way.  These YA novels will inspire you reject disruptive influences in your life by thinking about who your friends really are.

  • Conversion by Katherine Howe – Strangely similar illnesses strike the students at St. Joa18667792n’s
    Academy in Danvers, Massachusetts as the disease that sicked girls in Salem Village three centuries ago.  Colleen Rowly is determined not to panic as the symptoms spread among other students and several of her friends.  While accusations fly and talk show hosts salivate over such a juicy story, only Colleen sees the connection between to the Arthur Miller play, The Crucible.  Can Colleen find the cause of the illness before she becomes sick as well?

 

  • Shelter by Harlan Coben – After tragic events tear Mickey Bolitar away from his parents, he is shelterforced to live with his estranged Uncle Myron.  After switching high schools, Mickey finds both friends and enemies, but when his new new girlfriend, Ashley, vanishes, he follows her trail into a seedy underworld that reveals she is not what she seems to be.  Other mysteries wait to be unraveled as Mickey’s dad may not be dead.  Secrets from the Bat Lady and his mother’s drug addiction create a reality of suspicion and intrigue for Mickey to navigate solo.
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YA Lit Dream Interpretation: Snakes

In your dream you are walking along a path in the woods when suddenly the trail becomes writhing snakes.  You cannot walk, you slip, fall and land among them.  The snakes climb over and above you.  You cannot see the sky.  You are suffocating.  

You wake up suddenly. Startled and confused you wonder, what did it all mean?  Freud might have a lot of explanations for your dream.  But a better interpretation is: you need fiction to solve your nightmarish concerns.  No need to psychoanalyze when some reader’s advisory  has the cure.

As a positive symbol, snakes represent healing, transformation, knowledge and wisdom. It is indicative of self-renewal and positive change. (DreamMoods)

This nightmare about snakes sounds like an impetuous for growth.  Are you heading to college soon?  Are you taking driving lessons this spring?  What other opportunities are you facing?  The following titles will inspire and guide you to reach your potential.

14830774The Look by Sophia Bennett

Ted has the ultimate epiphany about modeling while on a photo shoot.  There is never a wrong time to choose what is right for yourself.  Learn to be yourself by reading about Ted’s struggle to escape her beautiful sister’s shadow.

 

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Black Boy White School by Brian F. Walker

Ant is going to get out.  He’s getting out of dangerous neighborhood.  He is going to find a new life at a new school.  Too bad the new school has its own problems.  Now lines have been crossed and choices have been made.  Its time for Ant to take a stand and prove wherever he is, he can make a difference. 

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Fashion Hits and Misses from YA Historical Fiction Book Covers, Part 4

I love historical fiction.  The drama, the intrigue and, oh– the fashion.  I just assume all the period details regarding clothing are accurate.  Or I did until my friend Liz shared it was her secret delight to troll the adult fiction section and find anachronistic apparel.  Curious to know how Liz knows all that she does about fashion?  Read her bio found in our first two collaborative blog posts for The Hub:

Turns out a lot of books from specific dates and locations feature outfits as cover art that either haven’t been invented yet or were way out of fashion.  I was eager to know if these same mistakes were being made in Young Adult historical fiction. After all, how was I to know? Here are some examples of books that got it right and those that got it wrong.

clockworkseries
The Infernal Devices trilogy by Cassandra Clare

Hit: The Infernal Devices series by Cassandra Clare.  This series takes place in Victorian London, 150 years before Clare’s popular Mortal Instuments series.  The first book, Clockwork Angel, is a 2011 Teens’ Top Ten winner. The Victorian Era  runs from 1837 to 1901 spanning the entire reign of Queen Victoria, and despite the inherent vagueness of generalizing fashion from one monarch’s rule,  examples for men’s dress and women’s dress on these covers are very typical of the 19th century and are therefore good examples despite being in a magical fantasy setting. 

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Fashion Hits and Misses from YA Historical Fiction Book Covers, Part 3

I love historical fiction.  The drama, the intrigue and, oh– the fashion.  I just assume all the period details regarding clothing are accurate.  Or I did until my friend Liz shared it was her secret delight to troll the adult fiction section and find anachronistic apparel.  Curious to know how Liz knows all that she does about fashion?  Check out her bio in the first post Fashion Hits and Misses from YA Historical Fiction Book Covers.

In the Shadow of Blackbirds  by Cat Winters
In the Shadow of Blackbirds
by Cat Winters

The jazz age of American history is very popular right now in TV and books. Recent Hub posts like Get Ready for Downton Abbey Season 4 With These BooksThe Glamour and Greed of The Great Gatsby and Prohibition Era: Ohio Roots in History and YA Lit highlight our current fascination with the 1920s and 1930s. While imitation is meant as a sincere form of flattery, this only works if the copy is accurate, no matter the intention.

Here are some  Young Adult historical fiction novels sent during the Roaring Twenties with covers that try and sometimes fail to reflect accurate costuming/

Hit: In the Shadow of Blackbirds by Cat Winters (Morris Award Finalist: In the Shadow of Blackbirds by Cat Winters)

Set in 1918, bombarded by the war and Spanish Influenza Sixteen-year-old Mary Shelley Black is mistrustful of popular fad spirit photography until a seance takes on personal meaning.  This dress is a bit short length-wise, at this time you would expect to see a longer hem. Overall style is decent.  The fashion of the time often featured a waist that was accentuated with a belt or sash.

 

American dress, 1916-1917
American dress, 1916-1917

This cotton dress was a gift of Mrs. Edwin Stewart Wheeler in 1956 to The Metropolitan Museum of Art. This costume is not on display and can only be viewed online.

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Fashion Hits and Misses from YA Historical Fiction Book Covers, Part 2

I love historical fiction.  The drama, the intrigue and, oh– the fashion.  I just assume all the period details regarding clothing are accurate.  Or I did until my friend Liz shared it was her secret delight to troll the adult fiction section and find anachronistic apparel.  Curious to know how Liz knows all that she does about fashion?  Check out her bio in the first post Fashion Hits and Misses from YA Historical Fiction Book Covers.

Turns out a lot of books from specific dates and locations feature outfits as cover art that either haven’t been invented yet or were way out of fashion.  I was eager to know if these same mistakes were being made in Young Adult historical fiction. After all, how was I to know? Here are some examples of books that got it right and those that got it wrong.

In Mozart's Shadow by Carolyn Meyer
In Mozart’s Shadow by Carolyn Meyer

Hit, sort of – In Mozart’s Shadow: His Sister’s Story (alternate title In Mozart’s Shadow: Nannerl’s Story) by Carolyn Meyer

The novel In Mozart’s Shadow: His Sister’s Story is set in eighteenth-century Europe. Older sister Nannerl remains home in Salzburg, Austria while her brother Mozart travels and performs.  How does the cover art compare?

The idea of the appropriate style of dress is there, but the quality of the fashion is poor and ill-fitting.   This particular dress looks like one you would wear for an “old-timey” photo.  The style of the time was a low-necked gown made from woven silks in elaborate patterns worn over panniers, a cage-like garment which extended the hips at the sides.  The bodice would be tightly fitted over a stiff pair of stays, known by modern terminology as a corset.  The front of the bodice exposed a stomacher, which was a triangle-shaped piece which was elaborately decorated.  Sleeves were normally close-fitting and worn to the elbow with ruffle and lace embellishments.  The skirt was often open in the front to expose the petticoat which was decorated to match.  There were several different types of dress worn at the time, but most did follow the same silhouette as described here. 

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Fashion Hits and Misses from YA Historical Fiction Book Covers

I love historical fiction.  The drama, the intrigue and, oh– the fashion.  I just assume all the period details regarding clothing are accurate.  Or I did until my friend Liz shared it was her secret delight to troll the adult fiction section and find anachronistic apparel.  Curious to know how Liz knows all that she does about fashion?  Here her bio:

I have had an interest in fashion history since I was young.  My mother would take me to estate sales and auctions where I would buy vintage fashions with my allowance.  After graduating from high school I found I did not know exactly what I wanted to do and ended up going to Miami University for costume design.  While studying I found the thing I loved most about designing costumes was actually doing the research that went into the design.  After this discovery I finished up my Bachelor’s Degree at Miami and moved to New York City to study what I loved most.  I got my Master’s Degree in Costume Studies at New York University and have been working in museums since..  Being with the objects in such an intimate setting has allowed my passion to continue to grow and for me to learn more about every aspect of fashion and clothing construction.

Turns out a lot of books from specific dates and locations feature outfits as cover art that either haven’t been invented yet or were way out of fashion.  I was eager to know if these same mistakes were being made in Young Adult historical fiction. After all, how was I to know? Here are some examples of books that got it right and those that got it wrong.

Hit:  His Fair Assassin Trilogy. Grave Mercy (2013 Best Fiction for Young Adults) and Dark Triumph (2014 Best Fiction for Young Adults) by Robin LaFevers

his fair assassin
His Fair Assassin series by Robin LaFevers

This series is set in Brittany in 1485.  Brittany is a region of North West France.  The book covers features the main character Ismae and Sybella. Both of these costumes are acceptable imitations of clothing found in 15th century France.  The v-neck style does appear to be more indicative of middle 15th century fashion instead of what you would find in the later half of the century. But because fashion didn’t change as fast at that time it would have still been common later in the century, especially for the masses.  Fashion was fairly limited at the time due to the production method and dyes used to make textiles.  Nicer textiles would have been astronomically expensive and impossible for commoners to own because of strict sumptuary laws that restricted the clothing that could be worn by different classes.  The hair, on the other hand, is very inaccurate as you can see from the comparisons below.

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What Teens Are Saying About What They Are Reading, vol. 5

It is snowing at my library.  It might be snowing at your library too.  Even when I am not reading I like to imagine things.  I wonder what people are doing other places.  Sometimes I like to role play and suppose I am another person.  If I were a teen and not a librarian,  would I read the same books? Would I suggest the same books I suggest now?  Below are suggestions of awesome teen fiction as recommended by young adult patrons.

Alex Rider series Book 5 Scorpia by Anthony Horowitz (Quick Picks for Reluctant Young Adult Readers)

choice 5-6

 

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The Seven Princples of Kwanzaa in Teen Fiction

kwanzaa-candles-candleholder
Kinara and Seven Kwanzaa Candles.

Kwanzaa is a holiday that lasts from December 26th through January 1st. The celebration originated in the 1960s and honors the impact of an African heritage on Americans.  While Kwanzaa is enjoyed by mainly people of African descent, the values shared at this celebration can be appreciated by everyone.  Originally defined in the Swahili language, Kwanzaa illustrated seven principles intended to guide and strengthen our community. (Kwanzaa)

  1. Umoja – Unity
  2. Kujichagulia – Self-Determination
  3. Ujima – Collective Work and Responsibility
  4. Ujamaa -Cooperative Economics
  5. Nia – Purpose
  6. Kuumba – Creativity
  7. Imani – Faith

Each principle is represented by a black, red or green candle; the colors of the Pan-African flag.  One candle is lit every night in a special order and each candle represents one of the seven principles.  To incorporate these ideals into your Kwanzaa celebration, here is a list of YA books that embody the seven principles.

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