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Category: Sites to Check Out!

What the Dang Heck Is a Webcomic??

Screenshot of Sarah Andersen’s website as viewed on my phone.

Webcomics aren’t typically given much attention by library professionals — possibly because they can’t be owned or lent; nevertheless, we should be familiar with them. After all, our goal should be to connect people with materials they love, not just materials the library owns. Additionally, if we want to be deft, resourceful readers’ advisers, we need to be familiar with all kinds of reading materials, especially the kinds of things our patrons are reading.

If you’re brand new to webcomics, this post will give you a foothold in their vast, wild world. If you’re familiar with webcomics, please leave your favorites in the comments as well as any resources you find helpful!

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Finding Diverse Books

Over the past few years, I have been working to increase the diversity of my school library’s collection, with an eye towards the ultimate goal of having the books on our shelves reflect the reality of the society in which we live.  While I use traditional review sources, I have also found it helpful to explore online resources specifically intended to review and publicize diverse books.  A few weeks ago, as part of a conference presentation, I decided to make this handy infographic of the sites I find most helpful. Hopefully you might find it useful too! (For active links to the websites, please scroll to the bottom of this post.)

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#WontBeErased: Transgender Awareness Week and Day of Remembrance

This November, Transgender Awareness Week (November 11-17) and Transgender Day of Remembrance (November 20) comes on the heels of our current administration’s ban on military service for transgender individuals, along with his latest efforts to remove legal protections afforded by federal civil rights law. Raising visibility of the issues facing transgender people is even more important now, as transgender kids are increasingly vulnerable to bullying, violence, self-harm, and suicide; and library staff and educators working with young people can and should be aware of how to support them.

For many of us, this means exploring our own biases and rethinking some of our ingrained ideas about sex and gender identity, which can be a difficult task. I’ve gathered some resources below–books, videos, websites, and even a webcomic–that can help adults working with youth become more knowledgeable and understanding, and therefore better able to offer support, resources, and empathy to our transgender patrons. For excellent fiction and nonfiction to offer to transgender, nonbinary, and questioning teens, follow these two links to past YALSA Hub articles. 

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January 16th is National Day of Racial Healing (#NDORH)

National Day of Racial Healing is a day to “Focusing on ways for all of us to heal from the wounds of the past, to build mutually respectful relationships across racial and ethnic lines that honor and value each person’s humanity, and to build trusting intergenerational and diverse community relationships that better reflect our common humanity.” (From the W.K. Kellogg foundation’s Truth, Racial Healing, and Transformation page.)

Below you will find links to previous Hub posts with information about materials with themes relating to racial healing, social justice, and activism. 

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Resources for Social Justice and Disability

Previously I posted on Social Justice and Disability – Evaluating Materials and Media with Characters with Disabilities. I am back to share some other essential resources and sites to follow. After a divisive presidential campaign, where the elected official hasn’t been forthcoming on stances in regards to disability issues this has raised concerns in the disabled community. Ambiguity has led to a sense of uncertainty. When it comes to social justice we need to be as informed as possible and empathetic as possible.

social-justice-and-disability-resources

In the last post I posted a video from Annie Elainey. Again, because she discusses so many great things. Here she discusses Disability Identity and Language:

As she discusses, individuals have their own preferences on how they want to be identified whether it is person-first (person with a disability) versus identity-first (disabled). She links to this article on the Autistic Self Advocacy Network that at the bottom has articles on both sides and some in between.

There are some other great Youtubers out there discussing their disabilities and issues around disability. That in itself requires its own post for The Hub. For now, check out these posts from Disability Now and Disability Thinking on Youtubers to follow.

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Gaming Anime

The response to the Sports Anime post was so enthusiastic that I am back again to highlight some gaming anime titles! My apologies to fans of the “stuck in a video game world” trope, you will have to wait your turn. These main characters are all into tabletop games! (If you must have a video game anime recommendation, I wrote about Summer Wars last year in my Anime Titles for Book Lovers to watch this Summer post.  

What we have this month is  a series about a haunted strategy board game, a dramatic show about a group of teens who trying to form a competitive memory card team, a slice of life comedy starring a mischievous student who distracts his classmate, and a series focused on trading card game battles.

Gaming is another broad sub-genre. While I attempted to select a range of games and themes, if you feel like I missed a show that this list cannot survive without, feel free to bring it up in the comments!

Hikaru no Go

Hikaru no GoHundreds of years ago Sai Fujiwara flung himself into a river when he was dismissed from his position as the emperor’s Go instructor. Since his death, he has haunted a Go board hoping to someday achieve his dream of playing one “Divine Move.” Hikaru Shindo, the sixth grade boy he is currently haunting, doesn’t seem to mind his spectral hitchhiker. Will the two be able to work together to make Sai Fujiwara’s dream come true?

Hikaru no Go is the least spooky ghost story in the world, mostly because the show is so focused on the gameplay of Go and the interpersonal relationships of the players. While the 23 volume manga series is still available in the United States, the DVDs of the show are out of print. But do not despair!  both the subtitled and dubbed versions of all 75 episodes the show are available to stream (with commercials) on Viz’s website and Hulu. If you run an anime club or a convention you can contact Viz directly on their website using this form to ask for permission to screen the show to your group.

About the Game: Go

A two player strategy board game that you can pick up and play for little to no cost. The goal of Go is to capture the opposing player’s pieces by surrounding them. Learn more at the American Go Association’s website.

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Blinded by Science: Youtubers and Podcasts to Follow

It’s Science Week!  Some feel science should just be left for homework, and for others it can totally be your jam, but science surrounds us, and it can be fascinating. Podcasts and videos can be a great way to explore your burning inquiries  whether you have just a few minutes or a whole hour to delve into a topic.

science for teens

 

YouTube-icon-full_color     SciShow Logo     Crash_Course_Youtube_logo

YouTube has some entertaining and engrossing science channels that are worthy of note, whether it be for entertainment, education, or news. Here are some channels you should know about:

SciShow

SciShow is a series of science-related videos on YouTube. The program is hosted by Hank Green of the VlogBrothers along with Michael Aranda, and has four new episodes per  week. Their weekly lineup includes (channel’s descriptions):

  • Mondays – Tune in for a short Dose about our weird world.
  • Tuesdays – Find answers to our most asked Quick Questions.
  • Wednesdays – Hank or Michael dives deep into a long-form Infusion episode, or an unscripted talk show or quiz show with a guest!
  • Fridays – Learn the latest in science News.

Also check out their sister channels SciShow Space, which posts every Tuesday and Thursday, to explore the universe and beyond.

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Week in Review: December 4th

Happy Friday, Hubbers!  Can you believe it’s already December?  Where did November go?  I’m just amazed that Midwinter is a month away!  Anyways, I have news on Star Wars (twice!) and a few best of 2015 lists to brighten your weekend.  ICYMI, I’m here to compile all the other fun and interesting news here just for you!  Here’s your Week in Review for Friday, December 4th.

week in review | YALSA's The Hub

Books & Reading

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Week in Review: November 20th

Hello! Congratulations, we’ve all made it to the end of another week, and looming on the horizon is the holiday season, and of course, end of the year best of books lists. Check out some highlights from this week in books and reading and resources on collection development.
week in review | YALSA's The Hub

Books and Reading

Neal Shusterman’s Challenger Deep won the National Book Award for young people’s literature.

This shadow-themed book list would make a great idea for a book display!

Barnes & Noble’s blog shared books for fans of The Red Queen by Victoria Aveyard.

Books that can be windows and mirrors into Muslim life at Rich in Color.

Looking to help readers make sense of tragedies like terrorist attacks? Tips on making book recommendations on sensitive and difficult issues might help.

Diversity in YA has rounded up this week’s new releases featuring diverse characters or authors

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Week in Review: November 13th

Good Morning. This week on the HUB we’ve been talking about the YA Services Symposium. If you missed going (like I did), check out the hashtag   for more tweets. Also #NaNoWriMo15 is still going strong – if you have teen writers, check in with how they’re doing. All kinds of YA authors are sharing their writing tips from Stephanie Perkins to Jennifer Lynn Barnes. Otherwise, sit back and see what else happened this week on twitter.

Book News:
Continuing her good deeds and her involvement with Scholastic, Taylor Swift donates 25,000 Scholastic books to New York City schools.

For Potterheads, did you notice these while re-reading or reading for the first time?

New York City challenges students to read a book a day! Jon Scieszka teams up to help.

Children’s author Jean Fritz is turning 100! Help her celebrate her birthday.

School Library Journal has a poll open for the top Must Have YA Books.

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