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Midseason TV Replacements – Readalikes, Part I

2015 January 16
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I’m back with more readalikes to match some of the midseason replacements TV networks will be putting out this month and next. Some of the shows I mentioned in my two posts this fall were actually pushed forward and are only premiering this month or next, while others I mentioned have already been canceled. :-( But to the best of my ability, these are some of the new shows you can expect to hit your television soon, from networks to cable to streaming. Check out part two next week.

Fresh-Off-the-BoatFresh Off the Boat (ABC) – starring Randall Park
Based on a chef’s memoir, this family comedy is about a Taiwanese family that moves to the United States and opens a restaurant. It takes place in the 1990s, which will be fun for adults and totally hilarious for teens who view that as nearly as historical as the 1890s. Click to watch the trailer.
Readalikes:

  • Mismatch by Lensey Namioka
  • The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri
  • Tall Story by Candy Gourlay
  • Fresh Off the Boat by Eddie Huang

 

 

read more…

Tweets of the Week: January 15th

2015 January 16
by Molly Wetta
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We stay glued to Twitter all week so you don’t have to! This week, Looking for Alaska turned 10, the Oscar nominations made twitter realize we need diverse movies as much as we need diverse books, and Harry Potter is getting a new illustrated edition.

tweets of the week | the hub

Books & Reading 

@sljournal Kick-butt Heroines, Epic Sagas, and Quirky Debuts | Fiction Grades 9 & Up | SLJ Reviews http://ow.ly/HkNhR

@PenguinTeen #LookingForAlaska is a fifth grader…and other thoughts from @johngreen upon the 10th anniversary of his debut novel. http://bit.ly/1BlbiSP

@PWKidsBookshelf First Look: New Illustrated Edition of Harry Potter http://pwne.ws/1ybJFuh

@ericsmithrocks 2015 Debut YA Novels You Need to Pick Up This Year: Books from @AdamSilvera @MeliGrey & @laurengibaldi up on @Bustle! http://bit.ly/1C3x1wo

@misskubelik Another amazing IF YOU LIKE… chart this one for THE LUNAR CHRONICLES wrappedupinbooks.org/2015/01/07/if-

@thegayYA “People […] think that straight teenagers don’t want to read about queer kids, and this is completely false.” http://bit.ly/14LxB7m

read more…

Why I Reread

2015 January 15
tags:
by Libby Gorman
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photo by flickr user Nick J. Webb

photo by flickr user Nick J. Webb

It’s hard to believe that January is about half over! Like Anna, I’m a little late in getting my reading goals for the new year going. I’ve gotten started on the Morris/Nonfiction Challenge (only doing nonfiction books), but as of this writing, I’ve still got 3 and a half books to finish for that. Beyond this challenge, and YALSA’s Hub Reading Challenge coming up in February, my main reading resolution for the new year is to read more new books. Looking back on 2014, I think I reread about 15 books, which is high even for me. I know that I reread a lot this past year largely because we had a big year of transition, but I tend to reread often even during less crazy times of life.

I know there’s a wide range of how readers and librarians feel about rereading. A 2013 informal survey of Hub bloggers shows just one example of this division. I can certainly respect the point of view of those who don’t like to reread, not least because I think many of those readers end up reading a lot more widely than I do. Still, find rereading to be both an enjoyable and a useful practice, and I wanted to share some of the reasons why:

  1. Rereading helps build old favorites to return to over and over again. This is, I think, the standard reason given by fans of rereading. When you read a book many times, you build a relationship with it. Just about every spring, I pull out Pride and Prejudice, so I feel like that book helps get me in a springtime mood. Of course, I also return to my old favorites when I feel stressed and need some comfort, or just when I don’t know what I feel like reading next.
  2. Rereading lets you experience a book differently over time. I have several books that I’ve read 2 or 3 times, even though I don’t consider themsunshine_robinmckinley old favorites, because I wanted to see if my opinion of them had changed. One that comes to mind is Sunshine by Robin McKinley (a 2005 Best Book for Young Adults), which I didn’t much like when I first read it in college (too squeamish about all things vampire), but have enjoyed rereading it in my late twenties, and now again in my early thirties. Author Rebecca Mead wrote an entire book about her different experiences of reading George Eliot’s Middlemarch at different times of her life.
  3. Rereading can contribute to a fun social experience of a book. I did notice in the Hub post above that even some people who don’t especially like to reread would do so when a movie was coming out, or to prepare for a book discussion. I find that rereading a book often gets me more excited to see an upcoming film or attend a book-related event (Harry and the Potters concert, anyone?).
  4. I’m never going to read all the books. Ok, so I know that nobody is going to read all the books. But I am a slow reader. I am never going to be the librarian who has read all the “next big thing” books before they are published. And while I try to read outside my comfort zone, I am always going to have to rely on reviews and other reader’s advisory tools to help me make recommendations. So in the end, I think that I might as well go ahead and reread that book one more time–who knows what I’ll rediscover?

-Libby Gorman, currently reading (for the first time) Laughing at My Nightmare by Shane Burcaw and currently rereading Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix by J.K. Rowling

Jukebooks: Girls Like Us by Gail Giles

2015 January 14
by Diane Colson
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This week I started with a song, “That’s What Friends Are For, ” by Dionne Warwick and friends, and then chose a book. Going with the spirit of the line,

Keep smilin’, keep shinin’,
Knowing you can always count on me, for sure.
That’s what friends are for.

Girls like usI selected Gail Giles’s book, Girls Like Us. The story is about two girls, Qunicy and Biddy, who have absolutely nothing in common except mental disabilities. After finishing high school, there is no where for them to go. So they end up as roommates. It’s not friendship at first sight by any means, but by the end they have established a hard-won trust in each other. This is the kind of friendship I connect with the song, a solid connection that holds people together through all of life’s circumstances.

“That’s What Friend Are For” was written by Burt Bacharach and Carole Bayer Sager in the early 80s. Rod Stewart sings it for the soundtrack of the movie Night ShiftHere’s Stewart’s version:

 

But the Dionne Warwick version is more famously known. In 1986, Warwick recorded it with Elton John, Gladys Knight, and Stevie Wonder as part of a benefit for the American Foundation for AIDs Research. At the time, AIDS was a dreadful, mysterious disease; many musicians and celebrities died while waiting for AIDs research to begin. This is the version of the song most likely to be heard on an oldies station, I’ve omitted the video of that performance because it looks terribly lip-synced. Nevertheless, the voices sound fabulous together, so here’s the audio:

 

The clip below is from a live performance at the Soul Train Music Awards in 1987. The line-up here is Luther Vandross, Whitney Houston, Dionne Warwick and Stevie Wonder.

-Diane Colson, currently reading an advanced readers copy of Vanishing Girls by Lauren Oliver

Contagious Passion: Characters Doing What They Love

2015 January 13
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“The things that you do should be things that you love, and things that you love should be things that you do.” -Ray Bradbury

Passion is contagious. I love hearing people talk about what they love. I’m sucked into their story, even if they are describing something I didn’t find remotely interesting prior to that moment. This is just as true for me in fiction as it is in real life. I am almost immediately won over by characters in a ruthless pursuit of a passion, whether it manifests in a career aspiration, hobby, vocation or, dare we say, calling. Below are just a few characters and their passions I have enjoyed sharing.

Labors of Love:

Cath- FangiFANGIRL_CoverDec2012-300x444rl by Rainbow Rowell

Cath is a passionate reader and a fan of the fantasy series featuring boy wizard Simon Snow. But Cath isn’t just a fan, she is an active participant in the fandom.  As “Magicath,” she writes Simon Snow fanfiction, first with her sister and then on her own. Writing fanfiction serves as an escape when her own life is difficult or lonely, and it’s Cath’s own fan base that, in part, helps her gain the confidence she will need to write original characters that tell her own unique story. Fangirl readers not only get to read Cath’s story throughout the novel, but her own Simon Snow fanfiction as well.

Will and her friends- Will and Whit by Laura Lee Gulledge; Top Ten Great Graphic Novels for Teens

If I had to give an award for the most unique hobbies I have ever encountered in fiction, I would give it to Wilhelmina and her friends. As Will introduces her friends to the reader, one of the first things we find out about each of them is what they are passionate about.  Will makes her own lamps mostly out of objects found in her aunt’s antique shop, her friend Autumn practices puppetry, Noel is constantly baking, and his little sister Reece makes up-cycled jewelry.  Readers looking for a graphic novel offering some D.I.Y. inspiration need look no furNothing Can Possibly Go Wrong Coverther than Will and Whit. One thing I love about Will and her friends’ hobbies is the way they find ways to share them with their community.  When Hurricane Whitney sweeps through, causing a town-wide blackout, and leaving locals bored, Will and her friends each contribute their talents to a makeshift arts carnival. With a phobia of the dark and a tragic past, making lamps becomes a way for Will to cope with her fears and, eventually, process and express her emotions.

Nate, the robotics club, and the cheerleaders - Nothing Can Possibly Go Wrong by Prudence Shen, Illustrated by Faith Erin Hicks; Top Ten Great Graphic Novels for Teens

Nate is president of the high school’s robotics club, a small but dedicated group, struggling for their school’s meager extracurricular funds.  Unfortunately, the school’s cheerleaders are just as dedicated and want the same funding for their cheer uniforms. Though the two groups initially have it out for each other, they become united by their lack of money, and use a cutthroat robotics competition as a last ditch effort to win prize money.  My favorite part of this graphic novel is that two groups bond over the fact that they both love what they do, even though what they love couldn’t possibly be more different. Nate and his friends have to deal with stereotypes surrounding what they love, but they fight them with an inspirational vengeance. (Cheerleaders are NOT dumb, and don’t EVER tell a girl that she shouldn’t be into robotics!) read more…

Analysis of TIME Magazine’s 100 “Best” Books for “Young Adults”

2015 January 13
by Molly Wetta
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Most librarians love a booklist. But when major media outlets cover young adult fiction, the results are sometimes…mixed. So it was with a healthy dose of skepticism that many young adult librarians viewed Time Magazine’s release of its list of 100 Best Young Adult Books.

ya

While the list does include many fantastic young adult novels, and many other books that are classics in their own right, it is not without its deficiencies. For your convenience, I’ve made a spreadsheet of all the titles (no clicking through slideshows!) and added the publication date and any ALA awards the title has won. read more…

Resolve to Read Better in 2015

2015 January 12
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resolve to read betterAs is usual with all new year tasks, I’m a bit behind on reading resolutions for 2015. Crazy as it seems, it’s almost halfway through January! I’ve been thinking about this due to some great reading resolution posts from around the internet. Book Riot has some especially great posts about how trying to read as many books as possible isn’t always the greatest and some suggestions for “reading harder.” Pop Sugar also has an interesting list of ideas to spur your reading habits.

Of course there are also the excellent and fun reading challenges that we do here on the Hub like the Morris/Nonfiction challenge and the Hub challenge. There’s still time to get in on the Morris/Nonfiction challenge and then get ready for the Hub challenge after the Youth Media Awards are announced! Full disclosure: I didn’t quite finish the Hub challenge last year but may give it another go this year!

In addition to these reading challenges and resolutions, I loved following all of the updates and news about the We Need Diverse Books campaign and thought that I was doing well reading diversely. But then I took a look at all of the books that I read last year and so many of the authors were white, straight, and featured characters who were the same, and a lot like me. In the library where I work, most of the teens that I see all day are minority students. And most of them are boys. My reading – about a lot of white girls in science fiction or fantasy settings – may not be necessarily speaking to their experiences. It’s actually pretty embarrassing; I should be doing better! I try my best to be an advocate for LGBTQ students and our populations of color. I buy a lot of diverse books for my library’s teen collection. I guess I just don’t read as many as I should.  read more…

The Monday Poll: Crushworthy Guys in YA Historical Fiction

2015 January 12
by Allison Tran
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monday_pollGood morning, Hub readers!

Last week, we asked which YA lit character you would choose to receive a makeover from. The makeover guru of Panem won by a landslide: Cinna from The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins took in 56% of your vote. In second place was Regan from Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell, with 16%. It might be hard to convince her to give you a makeover, but if you’re successful, you definitely won’t regret that eyeliner. You can see detailed results for all of our previous polls in the Polls Archive. Thanks to all of you who voted!

This week, we want you to tell us who is the most crushworthy guy in YA historical fiction (and don’t worry, YA historical girls will be up for discussion next week). Which rake or gentleman makes you swoon? Vote in the poll below, or by all means add your choice in the comments!

Who is the most crushworthy guy in YA historical fiction?

  • Mr. Darcy (Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen) (41%, 53 Votes)
  • Jamie Beaufort-Stuart (Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein) (20%, 26 Votes)
  • Jem Carstairs (The Infernal Devices series by Cassandra Clare) (17%, 22 Votes)
  • Laurie (Little Women by Louisa May Alcott) (12%, 16 Votes)
  • Captain Niall (Etiquette and Espionage by Gail Carriger) (8%, 10 Votes)
  • Finn Belastra (Born Wicked by Jessica Spotswood) (2%, 2 Votes)

Total Voters: 129

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YALSA’s 2015 Morris/Nonfiction Reading Challenge Check-In #5

2015 January 11
by Geri Diorio
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yalsa morris nonfiction sealsNot signed up for YALSA’s 2015 Morris/Nonfiction Reading Challenge? Read the official rules and sign up on the original post. If you’re finished, fill out the form at the bottom of this post to let us know! 

Doesn’t it still feel like the beginning of the month? I find myself thinking ,”This year just started, this month just started, I have got plenty of time to finish up The Hub’s Morris/Nonfiction challenge before the Youth Media Awards on February 2.” And then I look closer at the calendar and a tiny bit of concern creeps in – January 11th? That’s almost mid-way through January! I’ve only got three weeks to finish up!

I didn’t make you concerned did I? You are not like me. Tell me you are farther along the challenge than I am. Tell me (in the comments below) that you have finished The Family Romanov by Candace Fleming and The Scar Boys by Len Vlahos. That you enjoyed the audiobook of Leslye Walton’s The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender and were one of the lucky ones who got your hands on Laughing at My Nightmare by Shane Burcaw (my library has a mile long waiting list for that book.). Or, make me completely astounded and fill out the form at the bottom of this post because you have completed the challenge!

If you talk about books on social media, and you are taking part in the challenge, won’t you please use #hubchallenge to let the world know? And remember that any Morris Award finalists or YALSA Excellence in Nonfiction finalists you read as part of this challenge will count towards The Hub Reading Challenge, starting in February.

OK, time to calm myself down. There are still three weeks and eight hours until the challenge ends. I totally got this.

~Geri Diorio, currently reading The Carnival at Bray by Jessie Ann Foley

Women In Comics: Looking Ahead to 2015

2015 January 9
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As 2015 opens, I have decided to focus this month’s Women in Comics post on the great comics from women that we can look forward to this year. It looks as though 2015 will bring many exciting options for fans of everything from superheroes to memoirs. Get ready for some great reads in the new year!

Unbeatable Squirrel Girl: Marvel will be bringing their Squirrel Girl character back as an ongoing series created by Erica Henderson and Ryan North. The series starts this month, so you can check it out right now.

G. Willow Wilson: Author G. Willow Wilson has two exciting projects coming in 2015, the release of volume two of Ms. Marvel at the end of March and her involvement with the X-Men series starting this month. Both are part of her recently announced exclusive deal with Marvel, which may well point to a future with many more Marvel Universe stories from Wilson. read more…