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The Monday Poll: Favorite Boarding School YA Novel

2015 August 24
by Molly Wetta
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Last week’s poll asked what novelist who typically writes for adults you’d love to see pen a YA novel, and the overwhelming favorite was Monday Poll @ YALSA's The HubGillian Flynn with 38% of the votes, although Junot Diaz was another popular choice with 24% of the votes. You can see detailed results for all of our previous polls in the Polls Archive. Thanks to all of you who voted and commented last week!

This week, we’re looking for your favorite YA novel set in boarding school. Here’s a sampling of YA novels where the characters attend boarding school, but they are by no means the only ones! Vote for your favorite below or share another title in the comments.

What is your favorite boarding school book?

View Results

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A Teen Perspective: E-books vs. Print Books

2015 August 21
tags:
by Teen Blogger
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A teen perspective: Ebooks vs. Print Books

photo by Flickr user pedrosimoes

Breaking news – There has been a technological revolution where kindles, e-books, and various

online reading apps have taken over the world. Well, not exactly… But with today’s technological advancement it seems as though the popularity of reading books online has dramatically increased. In fact, according to a 2012 survey by Pew Research Center, the average number of books read by a reader of e-book is 24 books compared to 15 books for those who only read print. What makes reading an e-book more popular than reading a print book? I plan to evaluate the pros and cons for both types of books. read more…

Tweets of the Week: August 21st

2015 August 21
by Katie Shanahan Yu
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Here is a roundup of the tweets of the week:

rp_tweets-of-the-week-300x159.jpg

Books

read more…

One Thing Leads to Another: An Interview with Ernest Cline

2015 August 20
by Julie Bartel
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Check out previous interviews in the One Thing Leads to Another series here.

When composing an email to Ernest Cline it’s tempting to start babbling about your own geeky passions and experiences, to document the ways in which they overlap or intersect with things you’ve heard him talk about.  It’s tempting to point out all the ways in which you had similar experiences, were born just years apart, watched that movie at about the same time, have daughters who are almost the same age.  It’s really tempting to talk about how you read that he did X, and how you also did and/or loved this X-adjacent thing that is very similar or possibly exactly the same and wow I can’t believe you remember Y because I thought I was the only one who played/read/saw/loved that thing.  It’s really tempting, but you don’t do it.

Instead, you stare at your gmail inbox and wonder about that impulse, the desire to share and connect and gush, and you come to the conclusion that while it’s not really appropriate in this particular case, the impulse itself is just fine. Pretty great even.  Because the impulse is not about geek cred, or one-upsmanship, or a “notice me notice me” mentality.  It’s really about bonding, about the power of–to paraphrase some other famous nerds–being “unironically enthusiastic” about stuff, “being honest about what you enjoy” and being willing to raise your hand and say, “Hey! I LOVE this! Do you maybe love it too?”even when the thing you love isn’t necessarily cool or even geek-cool.  Geek solidarity is about unapologetically loving the stuff you love, and connecting with other people who love stuff and are unapologetic too.  Felicia Day says being a geek is “more than the hobbies we do or the things that we like,” that a geek is an “outsider, a rebel, a dreamer, a creator, whether it’s our own world or someone else’s. It’s a fighter. It’s a person who dares to love something that isn’t conventional.”  I don’t know if I embody all those bold ideas, but I know that Ernie Cline inspires this kind of geek camaraderie through the sheer force of his knowledge and passion and vocal enthusiasm.  Read Ready Player One or Armada and tell me you don’t want to immediately sit down and discuss the minutae of arcade games, Schoolhouse Rock, or The Last Starfighter.  I know you want to.

I know that even when you try you’re bound to slip a reference to that text-based 80s computer game or that semi-obscure cult film into your email to him even though you’re trying desperately to be “professional.” I know that it will be impossible not to gush a little bit (or a lot) and that he will be really cool about it anyway.  Probably because geek solidarity, probably because he’s a cool guy.

Thanks, Ernie, for taking the time to talk with me.  MTFBWYA (too.)

Always Something There to Remind Me

rp1-ernest-tall

Author photo by Dan Winters

Please describe your teenage self.

I was a socially awkward kid who spent most of his free time immersed in video games, science fiction novels, or playing Dungeons & Dragons with my equally geeky friends.

What did you want to be when you grew up? Why?

I’ve always wanted to be a writer. Initially, I wanted to write for the movies. At the time, it seemed like one of the coolest jobs imaginable. Film had a profound effect on my worldview, and on the culture at large, and I knew I wanted to be involved in the art form somehow, if I could.

What were your high school years like?

Like the characters in my novels, I spent a lot of time staring out the classroom window and daydreaming of adventure. I also wrote for the school literary magazine and newspaper a couple of years. My English teacher in Junior High, Mr. Craig Whitmore, was a huge influence on me. He was the first teacher of mine to encourage me to pursue a career as a writer. We’re still friends to this day. He’s become a novelist now, too. read more…

What Would Cher Read? A Clueless Booklist

2015 August 20
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CluelessOh my goodness – Summer Reading and Learning is almost over, and I am so thrilled. Don’t get me wrong, I love me some Summer Learning, but it’s tiring, yes?

Well, guess what I found out recently turned 20 years old? Me? Unfortunately, no, but something better – the movie of my generation (well, 1 of them, at least) – Clueless.

You know the story; a retelling of Emma, Clueless is led by Cher as she tries to find love and cultivate friendships as well as her wish to be a good person: a person who helps other people. It’s that shining gem starring Alicia Silverstone which also gave viewers our first glance at the never aging Paul Rudd. Seriously – have you seen him in the new Wet Hot American Summer prequel on Netflix? Dude doesn’t age.

Anyways…I decided to watch the movie to relive that summer of my 17th year where I had nothing more to ponder than where I thought Cher had bought that yellow plaid jacket/skirt combo. The movie was just as good as I remembered, and I realized that I’d love to delve more into Cher as a character. What was she like? And, most importantly, what would she read?

So, here it is, Hubbers, my attempt to guess as to what our dear Cher would most enjoy reading if she would happen to come in to the library and ask for some recommendations. And, one tiny nonessential secret before we move on to my top book picks for Cher. I actually hadn’t thought of the movie for a while, but as I was watching Bachelor in Paradise a few weeks ago (no judgement), Ashley I. was lamenting her status as a virgin, and boom! This quote popped in my head: “You’re a virgin who can’t drive.” I figured any random quote that would stick in my head for 20 years must be indicative of a fantastic movie. And, I was right. Anyways, here we go…

read more…

Light Speed: Getting Ready for “Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens”

2015 August 19
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KENOBIThis December something is happening that many people thought never would- we’re getting a new Star Wars film! Personally I am giddy over this, and in order to get ready for it I’ve been revisiting some of my favorite media in the Star Wars universe. Games, TV shows and books all complement the movies, so there’s much to see and even DO in the Star Wars universe these days. Where does one begin?

Kenobi by John Jackson Miller is an awesome book about how Obi-Wan Kenobi got himself settled on Tatooine after the events of Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith, and also how he got himself involved in a whole lotta drama he didn’t really want to get involved in. It’s hard to keep a low profile when there are Tusken Raider attacks happening all around you, teenagers sneaking to your hut to spy on you, and a mother who clearly wants more for her family than living in a general store in the middle of the dusty desert asking you for advice. If anyone can handle it, though, it’s Obi-Wan (sorry, he’s going by Ben now!) Kenobi. This is a particular favorite of mine because Obi-Wan is my favorite character in the Star Wars universe.

read more…

Graphic Novels: Not Just for Superheroes!

2015 August 19
by Courtney Allison
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Often, when we talk about comics or graphic novels, the flashy superhero stories are what first come to mind. As wonderful as those stories are, there is an overabundance of non-superhero graphic novels to be consumed. Many of these stories are perfect for YA readers. I’m a huge graphic novel fan and, to be honest, non-superhero stories are by far my favorite. These tend to be more personal, vulnerable, and relatable to me as a reader. I’m able to identify with a character who’s trying to navigate real life, more than a masked billionaire vigilante.

Here are a few of my non-superhero picks:

BandetteBandette Volume 1: Presto! By Paul Tobin and Colleen Coover

Bandette is a teenaged thief who spends her evenings causing trouble on the streets of Paris. No one is safe from Bandette’s mischief. She’s equally reviled by the city’s criminal element, as well as the Police Inspector. It’s all fun and games until a rival criminal wants Bandette out of the way. This would be a great book for readers who like independent female characters. It was one of YALSA’s 2014 Great Graphic Novels for Teens. If you like this one, be sure to check out Bandette Volume 2: Stealers, Keepers! read more…

Encourage Teens to Vote Now for the 2015 Teens’ Top Ten!

2015 August 18
by Anna Lam
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TeensTopTen_logo_WMHave you heard? It’s that exciting time again! Voting for the 2015 Teens’ Top Ten official titles has begun.

Teens can vote now through Teen Read Week™ (October 18-24) for their favorite titles for the 2015 Teens’ Top Ten at www.ala.org/yalsa/reads4teens

All teens aged 12-18 are eligible to participate in the voting process and will be able to vote for up to three of their favorite titles from the list of 24 nominees. A video featuring the 24 nominated titles can be found on YALSA’s Reads 4 Teens site. Individual trailers for each title can also be found on YALSA’s youtube channel.

Some Thoughts on “Real Reading”

2015 August 18
by Emily Childress-Campbell
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read-all-the-thingsI am sure I am not the only librarian who has repeatedly heard the phrase “real reading.” Whether I am in the midst of a readers’ advisory interview with a parent who insists that audiobooks are not “real reading,” or whether I’m meeting someone new in a social setting who proudly tells me they never read e-books because that’s not “real reading” and being a librarian I must agree with them, I always cringe at the phrase. I have no problem with readers having a particular preference. Everybody has their own inclinations towards specific formats. What bothers me is the complete lack of exposure that youth may suffer due to a parent’s bias against particular formats, or readers of any age feeling inferior and self-conscious about something as individualized and personal as a reading choice.

As library workers, I don’t believe it is our place to promote any format over another, but I do feel that we should provide our patrons exposure and access to as many formats as possible and strive to validate all reading preferences. Below are some topics that often incite the dreaded phrase “real reading.” I hope that by sharing some of my own experiences, I can either encourage you to broaden your reading horizons or at least give you and, by extension, the patrons you serve, something to think about. read more…

Notes from a Teens’ Top Ten Book Group Participant: Playlist for All the Bright Places

2015 August 18
by Guest Blogger
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TeensTopTen_winner_WMTeens across the nation vote each year for the Teens’ Top Ten book list and the results are eagerly anticipated during Teen Read Week every October– but did you know how the books are nominated for this list in the first place?

Books are nominated by members of Teens’ Top Ten book groups in school and public libraries around the country. To give you a glimpse of some of the teens behind this process, we’re featuring posts from Teens’ Top Ten book groups here on The Hub. Today we have a playlist created by Sarah Liang from the Mount Carmel Academy Book Club, to go along with your reading of All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven.

Reading has always been a way to escape reality for me, whether it’s through a cute romance novel or a suspense thriller. I don’t think I’ve ever spent a day away from a book! Sometimes it just helps to be able to curl up with a good novel on a nice day and let your imagination run free. Along with books, I have always had a deep connection with music. I’ve found that my love for music and books overlaps constantly. I am always thinking of songs that go along with a scene in my current read, and certain novels often come to mind when I’m listening to a good tune.

The galley program is one of my favorite things about the MCA book club and library. I really enjoy reading the unpublished books and giving my feedback on them. I have discovered some of my favorite new books through the galley program, and I can’t wait to discover even more!  read more…