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Tweets of the Week: June 12th

2015 June 12
by Katie Shanahan Yu
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Here is a roundup of the tweets that you might’ve missed this week!

tweets of the week | the hub

Books

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Get Excited for YA Lit at ALA Annual 2015!

2015 June 11
tags:
by Allison Tran
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AC15_LearnMore_250x124Shout it out, Hub readers– are we going to see you at the ALA Annual Conference in San Francisco in a few weeks? Quite a few of your friendly Hub bloggers will be there, and we’d love to say hi!

YALSA has a fantastic line-up of programs to help librarians sharpen their teen services skills, including a bunch of amazing events and sessions focusing on YA literature. You can read about all of YALSA’s offerings in detail on the YALSA wiki, but I’m here today to give you the highlights for YA lit lovers. Mark your conference schedule for the following!

Friday, June 26

YALSA and Booklist Present: The Michael L. Printz Program and Reception
June 26, 8-10PM. Tickets — $34
Kick off your Annual Conference by attending the best celebration of YA lit all year: the Michael L. Printz Program and Reception! Jandy Nelson, the 2015 Michael L. Printz winner for I’ll Give You the Sun, will speak about her writing. The honor book authors Jenny Hubbard (And We Stay); Jessie Ann Foley (The Carnival at Bray); Andrew Smith (Grasshopper Jungle); and author Mariko Tamaki, and illustrator Jillian Tamaki (This One Summer) will answer questions in an engaging panel format, followed by a reception. The annual award is administered by YALSA and sponsored by Booklist Publications.

Saturday, June 27

Margaret A. Edwards Brunch
June 27, 10:30am-12:00pm, Tickets — $39
Everyone likes brunch, right? Now add an AMAZING author to the allure of brunch, and you have a can’t-miss event. Sharon M. Draper, the winner of the 2015 Margaret A. Edwards Award, will speak about her writing. The award honors a significant and lasting contribution to writing for teens, and I can’t wait to hear what wisdom Sharon Draper will bring to this event.

BFYA Teen Feedback Session
1:00 – 2:30 Moscone Convention Center, Esplande 302
Want to hear what teens really think about what they’re reading? Come hear Bay Area teens react to the books nominated for this year’s Best Fiction for Young Adults list. They’re giving the BFYA committee their feedback, no holds barred, and it’s guaranteed to be brilliant, honest, and awesome.  read more…

Spotlight on: Teens’ Top Ten Nominees – Part 1

2015 June 10
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TeensTopTen_winner_WMIn today’s first  of a 4-part series, we’re going to highlight a bunch of titles from the current list of nominees for the Teens’ Top Ten awards. Voting (for teens!) starts August 15th, here. The Teens’ Top Ten list is always one of my favorites, because I love to see what, y’know, actual teenaged bookworms loved reading last year.

An annotated list (for reader’s advisory) of all the nominees is here. The annotations below focus on supplemental and promotional materials for each title, as well as where to find the authors online; if the young adults you serve are anything like the ones in my library, they love to follow their favorite authors in every medium available, and they’re definitely using authors as a resource to find more reading. Hopefully these spotlights will help you and your readers to discover more about each of the nominees!

I’m also going to break down some stats about the nominees in each post. To start, here are some stats about the authors: out of 24 nominated titles, 4 of the nominated authors are male, and the other 20 are female. I’m pretty uncomfortable assigning or guessing someone else’s racial identity based exclusively on pictures available online, so about the racial diversity of the nominated authors I will just say that it’s mostly a very white-looking crowd. 7 of the nominated authors have had a book nominated for a Teens’ Top Ten list before, and 5 of those 7 have made the list with a previous book or books.

Below, our first batch of nominees (they’re just broken into smaller groups for posting purposes, alphabetically by author’s last name, no significance to order!):

lets_get_lostLet’s Get Lost by Adi Alsaid. Numerous reviews are comparing Alsaid’s writing style to none other than John Green, so I think it’s fair to say we can expect more from him in the future! Let’s Get Lost was his debut novel; his second, Never Always Sometimes, comes out in August. He blogs here, there’s a nice landing page for Let’s Get Lost here, and a video shoot + author interview here. Alsaid is also on Twitter.

dont_look_backDon’t Look Back by Jennifer L. Armentrout. Armentrout is already a bestselling author with a *deep* backlist; great news for readers looking for their next pick after finishing Don’t Look Back (although, fair warning, not everything she’s published is YA), and this suspenseful mystery was already recognized on the 2015 Quick Picks for Reluctant Readers list. Her official author’s page is here, and she’s also on wattpad here. She’s active on Twitter, and Facebook, as well.

midnight_thiefMidnight Thief by Livia Blackburne. First in a projected series (with a prequel, Poison Dance, available now as well), Midnight Thief is Blackburne’s first traditionally published novel, and readers anxious to follow the narrative thread will be relieved to know the sequel, Daughter of Dusk, comes out August 4th. Blackburne’s author page is here, and she also blogs here, and is on Twitterread more…

An Updated Graphic Guide to LGBTQ YA Literature for Pride Month

2015 June 9
tags:
by Molly Wetta
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Nearly two years ago, I made this graphic guide to LGBTQ titles in order to give an overview of the variety of YA literature that features queer characters, from coming out stories to sci-fi adventures. Campaigns like We Need Diverse Books have brought even more attention to the need for diversity in children’s publishing, as well as called for more books that feature characters with intersecting identities.

I’m happy to say all of this means that the graphic was in need of an update. There have been lots of new titles published, and I wanted to make it more comprehensive (though by all means, still not exhaustive).

These books aren’t necessarily right for every reader, and don’t constitute the best, or the only, LGBTQIA+ fiction for young adults available. But it is a good starting off point for those interested in exploring the way these identities are portrayed in YA fiction. In some, the LGBTQ characters are the narrators, and in others, they are more supporting characters.  read more…

The Monday Poll: Your Summer Reading Plans

2015 June 8
by Allison Tran
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monday_pollGood morning, Hub readers!

Last week, we celebrated National Running Day by asking about your favorite YA book that features running. I just ran my first half marathon at the end of May, so I was especially happy to hear from fellow runners in the comments! Anyway, your picks for a podium finish: The Running Dream by Wendelin Van Draanen took 58% of the vote, Sloppy Firsts by Megan McCafferty pulled in 19%, and Breathe, Annie, Breathe by Miranda Kenneally gathered 13%. You can see detailed results for all of our previous polls in the Polls Archive. Thanks to all of you who voted and commented last week!

This week, as the days grow longer, we want to know your summertime reading style. Do you like to catch up with the newest releases? Re-read your cherished favorites? Binge read? Choose the statement that best matches your summer reading personality, or suggest another approach in the comments.

In the summer, I like to...

  • Set time aside for a some serious binge reading. READ ALL THE BOOKS! (54%, 70 Votes)
  • Catch up on the newest YA lit releases that everyone's talking about. (27%, 35 Votes)
  • Re-read some of my favorites-- comfort reading is the best! (8%, 10 Votes)
  • Try something different, something out of my normal reading habits. (6%, 8 Votes)
  • Pick a good audiobook for a long road trip. (5%, 7 Votes)

Total Voters: 130

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2015 Hub Reading Challenge Check-In #17

2015 June 7
by Julie Bartel
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Not signed up for YALSA’s 2015 Hub Reading Challenge? Read the official rules and sign up on the original post. Anything you’ve read since February 9 counts, so sign up now!

2015_reading_challenge_logoTwo weeks!  I’m not quite sure how it happened, but there’s only two weeks left before this year’s Hub Reading Challenge comes to an end.  Are you still working on it?  If you, like me, haven’t quite checked 25 titles off your list, what’s your plan for the home stretch?  If you have completed the challenge, congratulations and let’s talk!  How did you choose which titles to read?  Did you push the boundaries of your comfort zone?  Explore a new author, genre, or format?  Stick mostly with your tried and true?

As happened last year, I read more non fiction than I usually do, and wondered (again) why it takes a reading challenge to push certain books to the top of the to-read pile.  I also listened to a couple of audiobooks, which is something I don’t do nearly as often as I should.  (I  blame NPR.)  But the audiobook comments and recommendations over at the 2015 Goodreads Hub Reading Challenge group were pretty persuasive, and I’m happy I paid attention and tried something new.  The #hubchallenge hashtag is another excellent source of inspiration and discussion, in 140 character increments.

If you are still reading, you have until 11:59 PM EST on June 21st to complete at least 25 books from the official list. If you participated in the Morris/Nonfiction Reading Challenge this year, you can count any books that you read for that challenge towards this challenge as well.  2015 reading challenge logo - participantYou can share your progress by commenting below, and please include links to your online reviews, if you have them.  Don’t forget to post the Participant’s Badge on your blog, website, or email signature, and, as always, if you have any questions or problems, let us know in the comments or via email.

If you have already completed the challenge by reading or listening to 25 titles from the list of eligible books, be sure to fill out the form below so we can send you your Challenge Finisher badge, get in touch to coordinate your reader’s response and, perhaps best of all, to notify you if you win our exciting grand prize drawing! Be sure to use an email you check frequently and do not fill out this form until you have completed the challenge by reading 25 titles.  read more…

Tweets of the Week: June 5th

2015 June 5
by Molly Wetta
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Last weekend was BookCon, so you can find lots of great action by searching the #BookCon15 tag.

tweets of the week | the hub

Books & Reading

@TLT16  Today I’m talking about my concerns about using the term “clean” to label #yalit http://www.teenlibrariantoolbox.com/2015/05/sunday-reflections-the-trouble-with-clean/ …

@LisaMParkin  7 New Badass YA Heroines for You to Love @kris10writes @rahdieh @SJMaas @rosamundhodge http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lisa-parkin/7-new-badass-ya-heroines-for-you-to-love_b_7464164.html … #yalit #yafantasy

@TSUteam2 New Post 8 Books for Teens with Mental Health Issues – http://www.teenservicesunderground.com/8-books-for-teens-with-mental-health-issues/ …

@BookRiot June is LGBT Pride Month! Celebrate with an excellent YA novel w/ bisexual characters: http://ow.ly/NOCfa

‏@YAReviewNet  “I want LGBTQ characters to be human as well as LGBTQ.” #YARNAlum @malindalo http://ow.ly/NlH7S  @publisherswkly #LGBTQPubWistList #YAlit

@SandraLRichards  Chelsea Clinton is publishing a #book for young activists #community #YALit http://buff.ly/1K3fLLV

@emsreadingroom Don’t give up on #audiobooks until you try these tips. #yalit #amreading http://bit.ly/1HmYLgN

@shgmclicious Today is the launch of @sizeinYA, a new project with the amazing @farre @misskubelik @catagator! sizeacceptanceinya.tumblr.com read more…

Women in Comics: Fantasy

2015 June 5
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Fantasy is in many ways the perfect genre for comics and graphic novels because the combination of text and art allows creators to even more vividly bring to life the worlds that they create. Given this, it is not surprising that so many comic books and graphic novels fall into this genre, including some of the most famous superhero stories. This post includes some of the best fantasy stories found in comics and graphic novels and offers many different options for fans of all types of fantasy.

castlewaiting-coverCastle Waiting by Linda Medley (2007 Great Graphic Novels For Teens) – Set in a world made up of anthropomorphized animals, bearded women, mysterious travellers, and magic, this graphic novel is in the style of traditional fables, but with a more modern focus. Though set at the castle of the title, which is isolated since a Sleeping Beauty-like incident decades before, the book is actually broken into a series of stories, each of which focuses on a smaller group of the castle’s inhabitants. It is an interesting and unique read that is perfect for fans of fairy tales and fables. read more…

Happy Hug A Cat Day

2015 June 4
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Today is National Hug a Cat day. Check out some books with cats. Did I miss yours?
Add your favorite bookish cat in the comments.

Books showcased in video:
Anna Dressed in Blood by Kendare Blake
Bad Kitty by Michele Jaffe
Curious Cat Spy Club
by Linda Joy Singleton
Feral
by Holly Schindler
Garfield: Large and in Charge
by Jim Davis
A Grumpy Book
by Grumpy Cat
Princess Diaries
by Meg Cabot
White Cat
by Holly Black

Notes from a Teens Top Ten Book Group Member: The Geography of You and Me Fantasy Casting

2015 June 3
by Guest Blogger
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TeensTopTen_winner_WMTeens across the nation vote each year for the Teens’ Top Ten book list and the results are eagerly anticipated during Teen Read Week in October– but did you know how the books are nominated for this list in the first place?

Books are nominated by members of Teens’ Top Ten book groups in school and public libraries around the country. To give you a glimpse of some of the teens behind this process, we’re featuring posts from Teens’ Top Ten book groups here on The Hub. Today we have a fantasy cast list for Jennifer E. Smith’s novel The Geography of You and Me, created by Diamond Oldham of the Volunteer Reading Club in Clarksville, TN. 

geography of you and meThis isn’t an archetypal love story. Lucy and Owen, through all their trials and the tribulations, would never forget the Blackout in New York that began this quixotic love story. It took that one unique moment and they were in love, and in an instantaneous moment they were separated. Jennifer Smith’s book is one of heartache and unconditional love. When the characters cried, you cried. The journey of The Geography of You and Me is one I will never forget.

And if this sensational romantic tale is made into a movie, others will be able to appreciate the roller-coaster of emotions they will feel and be able to see that sometimes love can turn impossible things into possible things.

Here is my fantasy casting for The Geography of You And Me by Jennifer Smith:

emma-watsonEmma Watson as Lucy Patterson: in her later years as the shy, innocent type with a tad bit of wallflower in her.

 

 

 

 

logan-lermanLogan Lerman as Owen Buckley: the silent but mysteriously adventurous type.

 

 

 

 

 

liam-neesonLiam Neeson as George: the caring and nice doorman.

 

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