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Tag: Jane Austen

Women in Comics – Graphic Adaptations

Given the popularity of comics, it isn’t surprising that many works originally created and released as books and films have been adapted into comics and graphic novels. Not only does this bring these stories to a new audience, but in the process of adapting and illustrating these stories, the creators of the comics are able to add their own take on the original version. In the past, I’ve written about Hope Larson’s adaptation of A Wrinkle in Time and Leigh Dragoon’s adaptation of Legend by Marie Lu in my post on science fiction comics, but this list offers even more options for thought provoking adaptations of some popular works.

Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children CoverKristy's Great Idea graphic novel coverPride and prejudice comic

Women in Comics: Love Is In The Air

With Valentine’s Day right around the corner, it seems like a perfect time to highlight some great examples of love stories and romances in comics. Though romance comics were very popular in comics historically, this genre is sometimes overlooked in the current comics marketplace, receiving less focus than superhero stories and tales of adventure. But, this is not because of a lack of romantic tales being written. Though they may not always garner as many headlines, these stories exist and have great crossover appeal for readers who don’t generally read comics.

Lucy from the Peanuts with hearts around her head
gif via

Get Creative with YA Lit

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image by flickr user Lorraine Santana

Do you know the feeling that comes sometimes when you finish reading a really great book, the one in which you don’t want the story to end? You can always hope for a sequel or a companion novel. If there is a film adaptation, you can experience the world, again, there. Or you can keep the world alive by creating something yourself.

I recently attended the DML2014 conference in Boston and found myself surrounded by people passionately talking about ways to interact with digital media. As a blogger for The Hub, I immediately focused on the ways that people were using these programs and communities to create content based on YA books. This also tied in well with last week’s Teen Tech Week  theme of DIY @ your library. Below, I have listed a handful of ways that youth and adults are taking their favorite stories and making something new.

Create a Program

One of the tools that was frequently mentioned at DML2014 is Scratch, a web-based programming tool that allows users to create and share games, videos, and stories. I searched Scratch for projects related to popular YA titles and found a wide variety of program types including interactive quizzes and games, slideshows, and still image fanart. A few examples include a Divergent Aptitude Test Simulation, Snape’s Potion Game (Harry Potter), and The Mortal Instruments: Downworld Attack game. These users have found a way to continue interacting with books that they enjoyed while also learning how to code computer programs. Scratch is only one of a number of options available in this area, too.

Happy Birthday, Jane Austen

Jane Austen was born 238 years ago today in Steventon, England. Her work has grown more popular, even though she only finished six novels. Who could forget the masterpiece Clueless (based on Emma)?

With so many spin-offs, prequels, and modernizations of her work, we’re celebrating her today with a list of teen titles.

Titles inspired by Pride and Prejudice:
Enthusiasm by Polly Shulman (2013 Popular Paperbacks for Young Adults)
When Julie’s best friend geeks out, she goes all in. Ashleigh’s decided that Julie’s love of Pride and Prejudice is the next big thing. Soon Ashleigh’s convinced Julie to wear a vintage gown while sneaking into a dance at the local all boys prep school. Could they find true love waiting for them?

I was Jane Austen’s Best Friend by Cora Harrison
Jane’s cousin Jenny chronicles their daily routine, where we get an in-depth look into the Austen’s way of life. When Jane falls deathly ill, Jenny sneaks out of school to mail a letter to Jane’s mother. While outside, she meets a boy and fancies herself in love.

Pies and Prejudice by Heather Vogel Frederick
The 4th book in the Mother-Daughter Book Club series takes Emma and her family to England for her first year of high school with a house swap. To make the others feel included, the club reads Pride and Prejudice and chat via video. The remaining members of the club at home start a pie business in order to bring Emma back home for spring vacation. The family who swapped houses with Emma’s family has two teen boys that act just like Bingley and Darcy.

The Hub Holiday Gift Guide

Image by JD Hancock
Image by JD Hancock

Now that Thanksgiving has ended for another year, many of you are probably turning your attention towards holiday shopping. Whether you are planning to brave Black Friday sales today, wait for Cyber Monday deals or procrastinate until the last second, the bloggers at The Hub have put our heads together to come up with some great suggestions for the book lovers on your list.

From Classic to Contemporary: Pride and Prejudice to The Lizzie Bennet Diaries… and eventually to Austenland

Classics — whether they are novels, plays, or epics — offer us great characters, interesting plots, and lots of things for discussion… but sometimes they can be a little tough to tackle. Sometimes we adore them, but sometimes we can’t get past page 3, let alone the requisite 50. That doesn’t mean that we should give up what they have to offer, though, does it? Many of today’s authors try to use these classic works as a starting-off point to write a more modern version. If done well, these contemporary versions can have a huge impact and impart the same wisdom that made the earlier story gain its classic status. Jessica Pryde and I decided to find and examine some great pairs of classics and their contemporary rewrites to see if they are successful… or maybe not.

prideandprejudice2The Classic: Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

“It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.”

In one of the most quoted and famous novels of all time, Miss Elizabeth Bennet makes astute observations about the societal structures in place around her while simultaneously trying to avoid her mother’s attempts to marry her off to an appropriate man.  While encouraging her elder sister’s romantic attachment to a very eligible bachelor, Lizzie meets his friend, Mr. Darcy, and the two immediately come to detest one another.  Through a series of unfortunate interactions and the verbal machinations of others, Lizzie’s hatred for Darcy continues to deepen and when he unexpectedly proposes, she refuses.  When her youngest sister, Lydia, elopes with a dashing, but devious soldier, Mr. Darcy covers the scandal and sees them properly wed.  Upon these actions, Lizzie knows that Mr. Darcy truly must care for her and she must admit to her own growing feelings for him.

From Classic to Contemporary: Persuasion to For Darkness Shows the Stars

Classics — whether they are novels, plays, or epics — offer us great characters, interesting plots, and lots of things for discussion … but sometimes they can be a little tough to tackle. Sometimes we adore them, but sometimes we can’t get past page 3, let alone the requisite 50. That doesn’t mean that we should give up what they have to offer, though, does it? Many of today’s authors try to use these classic works as a starting-off point to write a more modern version. If done well, these contemporary versions can have a huge impact and impart the same wisdom that made the earlier story gain its classic status. Jessica Pryde and I decided to find and examine some great pairs of classics and their contemporary rewrites to see if they are successful … or maybe not.

The Classic: Persuasion by Jane Austen

You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope. Tell me not that I am too late, that such precious feelings are gone forever.

persuasionAnne Elliot had once been happily betrothed to a poor but kind naval officer, Frederick Wentworth. When both her family and a trusted friend objected to the match, however, Anne broke the arrangement and spent the next nine years deeply regretting her action. When Wentworth reemerged a newly rich and successful Captain after the Napoleonic Wars, Anne’s family was on the brink of financial ruin. To help defray costs, they’d rented their home and lands to Wentworth’s sister. Forced to be in each other’s company once again, Anne and Frederick must each decide whether they can be persuaded to put aside their own hurt and mistrust to reconcile with the one person they each treasured the most.

Teen Perspective: Cory’s Blogger Profile and Ridiculous Taste in Books

teen blogger coryHey, my name is Cory (as in the girl name, not the identically-spelled boy name), and books are my friends. And by friends, I mean the kind of friends that aren’t invited to a party, but you smuggle them in anyway by hiding them in your bag. Good friends, friends I try to force my mother to like by placing them ever-so-subtly on her pillow. But she doesn’t read everything I throw at her because she has preferences. I have preferences, too, actually, if you’ll believe it. Everyone has things they look for in a good book, right? While I’m not claiming these things will ultimately decide whether I’ll pick up a book, let alone if I’ll like it (I absolutely love humor in literature, for instance, but does that mean I’m never going to love anything serious?), but there are certain things a book can do to make itself more memorable for me. Okay, a lot of things. I’ve tried to narrow them down a bit:

Unique Style

Five Books for the End of the World

I am not a superstitious person. But if I were, and I thought the world was going to come crashing down around us in less than a month as some are predicting, here are the five books I would want in my post-apocalyptic handbag.

(Note: However tempting it is to choose things like The Physicians’ Desk Reference, the spirit of this game is more like “what 5 books would you want to read over and over?”, not “which 5 books will help you survive?” For thoughts on survival and YA lit, check out Sarah Debraksi’s recent post about her life post-Sandy.)