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Tag: mike lupica

Bingewatching YA Read- Alikes

With all the ways to watch TV today including; on demand, DVR, and instant streaming it is possible to watch an entire series’ episodes back to back rather than in a serialized week to week format.  This kind of watching has been dubbed “binge-watching.”  Maybe when you hear this term, an image comes to mind of someone mindlessly watching hour after hour of TV whilst eating chips.   As fun as that sounds, “binge-watching” can also mean focusing on just one show over the course of many days or weeks.  As a reader the way I become immersed in the characters and world of a good book are a familiar, comforting feeling, and binge-watching a quality show can offer a similar (on-screen) experience.  Here are some great YA read-alikes inspired by some of my binge-worthy favorites.

Orange Is The New Black

Orange is the New Black – One of Netflix’s original binge-worthy series. This is the story of a Piper, a privileged woman who has to serve prison time for a crime committed in her 20s.

Read-alikes:

monster-walter-dean-myers

* Monster by Walter Dean Myers (2000 Printz Award Winner, 2000 Quick Pick for Reluctant Readers , 2000 Best Book for Young Adults) A story told in the form of a screenplay by a young man incarcerated in a juvenile detention center.

* Hole in my Life by Jack Gantos (2003 Printz Honor BookPopular Paperback for Young Adult 2006 , 2003 Best Books for Young Adults). When Gantos was a young man with heavy debt and a promising writing career he agrees to help sail a ship packed with drugs from the Virgin Islands to New York City.   This memoir describes this well known author’s short-lived criminal career and his incarceration.

* Orange is the New Black: My Year in a Women’s Prison by Piper Kerman. The book that inspired the show; Kerman tells the tale of how she spent a year in prison the humiliations she endured, and the relationships she forged.

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Are You Ready for Some Football?

It’s that time of year again– pull up a chair and get ready for football. Football season started already. If you can’t get enough football, here are some books for you. Of course, there are more football books than those below, so add your favorites in the comments.

football display

The Bridge from Me to You by Lisa Schroeder
Lauren’s new to town and she’s trying to put her past behind her and move on. Colby lives in the same small town, but has visions of escaping somewhere where he isn’t known for his football skills.  Can the two of the find a way to belong in this small town?

Catching Jordan by Miranda Kenneally
Jordan’s the quarterback for her high school football team. She’s awesome at her job, loves being in charge of the team and being one of the guys. When another QB comes to town, could her position be on the line?

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Want to Read S’more? Have Some Ooey Gooey Delicious Books in Threes

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Summer is the perfect time for reading for fun and making s’mores. In fact, yesterday was National S’mores Day.

So I decided to combine these two concepts and give you three books on the same topic – think of them as the graham cracker, the marshmallow, and the chocolate of a s’more- all deliciously good.

Fantasy:

Hub 1

Thrillers:hub 2

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Books For Every Class In Your Schedule (Part 2)

Photo by naosuke ii. CC BY 2.0.
Photo by naosuke ii. CC BY 2.0.

Welcome back for the second post in our back-to-school schedule series!

Period 3: English – Laura Perenic
Today’s curriculum theme is “Humanity Through Diversity.”

Historical Fiction: Brotherhood by A.B. Westrick
In reconstruction Richmond, Virginia, brothers Shad and Jeremiah learn different lessons from attending KKK rallies.

Realistic: Beneath a Meth Moon by Jacqueline Woodson
Laurel Daneau hides from the tragedy of Hurricane Katrina by immersing herself in drugs. Estranged from her family and her own emotions, Laurel meets street artist Moses who has a more effective way to dealing with pain.

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Take Me Out to the Ball Game!

baseballIt’s official, opening day is upon us and so is the start of the best season there is: BASEBALL SEASON! I love this time of year. It reminds me of good memories of the end of winter and the start of warm weather, lazy summer afternoons listening to Harry Caray call a game in my backyard, and the smell of my mitt (old, worn out, and fitted to perfection) as I crouched in position covering first.

As a fan of baseball, of course I love reading books and watching movies about the sport. As I started prepping for the start of the 2013 baseball season, I realized some of my favorite baseball movies can be paired with some really great teen novels.

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Showing Our True Colors: YA Covers That Got it Right in 2012

Publishing companies aren’t putting out enough YA titles that feature protagonists of color. And when they do, some book covers try to hide or obscure the characters’ race by showing them in silhouette or in shadow, or at times whitewashing them completely. Even the most diverse library collections sometimes look homogenous when you just see the covers. Don’t believe me? Check out my post from last week: “It Matters If You’re Black or White: The Racism of YA Book Covers.”

The problem is insidious, but it’s not completely pervasive, as many of you pointed out in the post comments last week. There are a lot of publishers, authors, and books that have no problem putting people of color on the covers of their books. So I just wanted to take a moment to recognize and celebrate those folks who understand how important it is for everyone to be able to see their own identity validated on the cover of a book. Here are some books covers that got race right in 2012.

Ichiro by Ryan InzanaA.D.D.: Adolescent Demo Division by Douglas RushoffNever Fall Down by Patricia McCormickBoy21 by Matthew Quick

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Sleeping Bags and Books

I love summer for the flip flops, the roasting of marshmallows, and the great summer books. When I was younger, I went to a few camps–Girl Scout day camp and two basketball camps — but there were no cute boys and no campfire, and I never made lifelong friends. When I was young, I loved the Baby-Sitters Club books, and I read and reread Baby-Sitters’ Summer Vacation because I wanted that experience. In case you’re spending the summer at home this year, you can live vicariously through these fun books.

Sports and Fitness Camp

Huge by Sasha Paley (which was adapted for TV on ABC Family for one season): Wilhelmina can’t believe her parents forced her to go to fat camp. They own a chain of fitness centers and she’s not good for their image. Rebelling, she vows not to lose a single pound during the summer. Her attitude makes her bunkmate angry, especially when the two of the go after the same guy. Will the girls learn to get along?

Never Cry Werewolf by Heather Davis: Shelby follows her heart, which leads her into trouble. This time trouble equals summer camp, and not the leisurely camp with sports or canoe rides down the river — this is brat camp. It’s where the rich send their children for hard work and therapy and to learn discipline. It’s basically the worst possible way to spend your summer. Just when she thinks she might have everything under control, a boy appears. He’s a handsome British boy with a secret, and he has disaster written all over him.

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