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2017 Hub Reading Challenge May Check-in

It’s time for another Hub Reading Challenge Check-In, and with less than a month left in the challenge it’s definitely a good time to take stock.

 

the hub 2017 reading challenge

 

It’s helpful for me to remember that the challenge is intended to encourage all of us to dive deeper into the award winner and honor books and YALSA selected lists with an eye towards discovering new authors and title, exploring new genres, reading outside of our comfort zones, and improving reader’s advisory wherever that happens.  For me, I’ve noticed that a lot of my reading this year has already resulted in successfully connecting friends, family, and acquaintances with books that might not have been on my radar without YALSA recognition.  I’m especially, stunned and impressed, looking back on it as I write this, by the wide range of reader’s who have benefited from these lists and honors.

2017 Hub Reading Challenge April Check-In

Hello Hub readers; it’s time for another Hub Reading Challenge Check-In!

the hub 2017 reading challenge

According to my Goodreads shelf where I’m tracking my progress, I’ve got 15 books done for the Challenge so far. My now-standard approach to the Challenge is to load up on Graphic Novels in the first couple of months; getting my numbers up early helps keep me motivated. I love the format anyway, and I work in a high school, and have had a lot of success book-talking graphic novels to students who otherwise feel like they just don’t have time to read for fun when school’s in session. I’ve definitely enjoyed the ones I’ve managed to read so far (especially, to echo Anna’s check-in post, Paper Girls. That palette!! The eco-dystopian horror-show of Brian K. Vaughn’s We Stand On Guard felt terrifyingly plausible, and John Allison’s warm, wry Giant Days has been a perfect match for some of my seniors anxious to imagine themselves into college).

Promoting Reading and Reading Diversely in High School Libraries

As high school librarians who value diverse voices, we have always been sure to have and feature books by people of color and other under-represented groups. Like many in our field, we create monthly, thematic displays and reading lists, one example being those that highlight books by and about African-Americans during Black History Month.   Similarly, when we create our list of selected readings for our yearly summer reading program, we have been very thoughtful about being sure that there is something for everyone in terms of demographic representation and genres.

While all these actions are steps in the right direction, this school year we decided to be even more intentional about encouraging our students and staff to read more diversely. By introducing the Raptor Reading Bingo challenge, we have taken our focus on social justice and multicultural literacies to the next level. We created a bingo board that gives students and staff choice in their readings, but is designed to get them to read books by authors of color and featuring other under-represented groups like LGBTQ.

Set a Goal and Read: The Beauty of Large Reading Projects

photo by flickr user msbhaven
photo by flickr user msbhaven

Ah, summer. The time for lazy reading by the pool, picking up whichever book strikes your fancy… or frantically completing long summer reading assignments. It depends on who your teachers are.

I definitely had a couple of long, involved reading assignments during my school years, most notably the summer before I started college. It was strongly suggested that we read an abridged version of Don Quixote before term started. Being the rule follower that I am, I went to the library and could only find the unabridged version… so that’s what I read. Even with that experience, though, something about summer brings out my enthusiasm for planning large reading projects.

What do I mean by a large reading project? Well, make no mistake, I completely believe in reading for fun and pursuing those reading materials that interest you. And my reading projects are materials that interest me, but they are those items that I never seem to get around to in the course of my normal reading: really long, thick novels that don’t automatically call to me when I flop down on the couch at night, for example, or lists of books that I wouldn’t remember to get to if I weren’t intentional about it. 

2013 Hub Reading Challenge final check-in

reading challenge logoHappy Saturday, everyone! 83 titles. 13 lists and awards. 20 weeks. And now, the Reading Challenge comes to an end. You ahve until 11:59pm EDT tonight to wrap up the last of your reading and listening, and you have until 11:59pm EDT on Sunday, June 23 to let us know if you’ve finished (or conquered?!) the challenge.

At that point, we’ll do our drawing to determine our grand prize winner, who will receive a YALSA tote bag full of recent YA lit! (If the winner is a teacher or librarian or something similar, he or she will also receive a professional development title.) We’ll also send everyone their finisher badges and extend invitations to all challenge finishers to submit a reader response that we’ll publish on The Hub.

We’re also interested in knowing what you thought of the challenge! Leave us a comment and tell us what your favorite book was, what you enjoyed most about participating, what you’d like us to change for our next reading challenge, or anything else you want us to know. Want to share your thoughts more privately? Email us.

If you’ve completed the challenge by reading or listening to 25 titles from the list, let us know by filling out the form below. (The information you provide is what we’ll use to send you your Challenge Finisher badge, contact you about your reader’s response, and notify you if you win our grand prize drawing, so be sure to use an email address you actually check!) Do not fill out this form until you have completed the challenge by reading 25 titles.

2013 Hub Reading Challenge check-in #19

reading challenge logoNot signed up for YALSA’s 2013 Hub Reading Challenge? Read the official rules and sign up on the original post. Anything you’ve read since February 3 counts, so sign up now!

This is our penultimate check-in! With just one week left, do you think you can finish the challenge? Or have you already gone above and beyond? Is there anyone out there who’s read the whole list (or come close)? If you’re not going to finish the challenge, what got in your way — and was it still a worthwhile experience? Have you learned something about yourself as a reader?

Our final check-in post will go up next Saturday, June 22nd, and you’ll have until 11:59pm that night to finish reading. If you complete the challenge by reading 25 books, make sure you’ve filled out the form by 11:59pm on Sunday, June 23rd. On Monday the 24th, we’ll select our winner, send out the final set of challenge finisher badges, and invite everyone who finished the challenge to submit a reader response to their favorite (or least favorite!) title they read.

Keep up the good work as we enter the home stretch!

If you’ve completed the challenge by reading or listening to 25 titles from the list, let us know by filling out the form below. (The information you provide is what we’ll use to send you your Challenge Finisher badge, contact you about your reader’s response, and notify you if you win our grand prize drawing, so be sure to use an email address you actually check!) Do not fill out this form until you have completed the challenge by reading 25 titles.

If you’re not done yet, happy reading and keep us posted on your progress! Tweet your reviews and progress with the #hubchallenge tag, and we’ll see you at next week’s check-in!

2013 Hub Reading Challenge check in #18

reading challenge logoNot signed up for YALSA’s 2013 Hub Reading Challenge? Read the official rules and sign up on the original post. Anything you’ve read since February 3 counts, so sign up now!

With two weeks and two days to spare, I finally finished book number 25 for the Hub Reading Challenge and I’m feeling pretty pleased. Not only did I actually complete the challenge (which is, sadly, not a thing I do all that often) but I also read some really great books, many that I would definitely have missed were I not reading from the challenge list. Lucky #25 was Maureen Johnson’s The Name of the Star, a book I somehow just never caught up with when it first came out, so I ended on a real high note.

code name verity elizabeth wein coverraven boysRoundHouseOf the books I read specifically for this challenge, I think The Raven Boys, Code Name Verity, and The Round House were my favorites, which doesn’t surprise me. But I also feel like I read a lot further afield than I normally do, exploring unfamiliar authors and passed-over genres. I read a lot more nonfiction than I normally do, and picked up some titles that I would probably have avoided, were I not actively trying to stretch. I still feel like I could have pushed my own comfort zone a bit more, and I’ll keep working on that, but overall I really enjoyed this challenge.

What about you? Are you close? Have you finished? Do you feel like you learned anything about your own preferences or reading habits? I know I did!

If you’ve completed the challenge by reading or listening to 25 titles from the list, let us know by filling out the form below. (The information you provide is what we’ll use to send you your Challenge Finisher badge, contact you about your reader’s response, and notify you if you win our grand prize drawing, so be sure to use an email address you actually check!) Do not fill out this form until you have completed the challenge by reading 25 titles.

If you’re not done yet, happy reading and keep us posted on your progress! Tweet your reviews and progress with the #hubchallenge tag, and we’ll see you at next week’s check-in!

2013 Hub Reading Challenge check in #17

reading challenge logoNot signed up for YALSA’s 2013 Hub Reading Challenge? Read the official rules and sign up on the original post. Anything you’ve read since February 3 counts, so sign up now!

This is my last check in before the challenge is over and I am still failing. I haven’t been reading as much for many reasons, but mainly because of hockey playoffs, summer reading program preparation, and shiny new books that just keep coming into my library.

Even though I totally “bombed” this challenge, I do plan on reading all the Alex Award winners at some point. Are any of you lacking in the “good intentions department” like me? Or did you all finish months ago? Let me know in the comments!

If you’ve completed the challenge by reading or listening to 25 titles from the list, let us know by filling out the form below. (The information you provide is what we’ll use to send you your Challenge Finisher badge, contact you about your reader’s response, and notify you if you win our grand prize drawing, so be sure to use an email address you actually check!) Do not fill out this form until you have completed the challenge by reading 25 titles.

If you’re not done yet, happy reading and keep us posted on your progress! Tweet your reviews and progress with the #hubchallenge tag, and we’ll see you at next week’s check-in!