Blinded by Science: Youtubers and Podcasts to Follow

It’s Science Week!  Some feel science should just be left for homework, and for others it can totally be your jam, but science surrounds us, and it can be fascinating. Podcasts and videos can be a great way to explore your burning inquiries  whether you have just a few minutes or a whole hour to delve into a topic.

science for teens

 

YouTube-icon-full_color     SciShow Logo     Crash_Course_Youtube_logo

YouTube has some entertaining and engrossing science channels that are worthy of note, whether it be for entertainment, education, or news. Here are some channels you should know about:

SciShow

SciShow is a series of science-related videos on YouTube. The program is hosted by Hank Green of the VlogBrothers along with Michael Aranda, and has four new episodes per  week. Their weekly lineup includes (channel’s descriptions):

  • Mondays – Tune in for a short Dose about our weird world.
  • Tuesdays – Find answers to our most asked Quick Questions.
  • Wednesdays – Hank or Michael dives deep into a long-form Infusion episode, or an unscripted talk show or quiz show with a guest!
  • Fridays – Learn the latest in science News.

Also check out their sister channels SciShow Space, which posts every Tuesday and Thursday, to explore the universe and beyond. Continue reading Blinded by Science: Youtubers and Podcasts to Follow

Booklist: New Nonfiction Science

It’s been a very science-y week so far! The Hub kicked off Monday with funny science books for teens, and yesterday was the delicious Pi Day (not to mention Einstein’s birthday). Today I’ve got a sampling of some new nonfiction science books available for teen readers. For information on STEAM vs. STEM programming, check out this post on the YALSAblog, or for more inspiration on science programming, check out Anyone Can Do Science! which has lots of fun ways to incorporate science into your regular programming schedule.

Put on your lab coats and take a look — and don’t miss a PDF of this list at the end.

New nonfiction science for teens

 

The Story of Seeds: From Mendel’s Garden to Your Plate, and How There’s More of Less to Eat Around the World, by Nancy F. Castaldo

Discusses the impact of seeds on food supply, and their importance in everything from biodiversity to the global economy.

It’s Getting Hot in Here: The Past, Present, and Future of Climate Change, by Bridget Heos

Examines the history of climate change on our planet, including humanity’s role and current politics, and how young readers can take action. To add to an environmental discussion, pair with Fuel Under Fire: Petroleum and Its Perils, by Margaret J. Goldstein. Continue reading Booklist: New Nonfiction Science

Booklist: Scientifically Funny Nonfiction

The best kind of science books are the one that share information without getting too technical, are not monotonous, and have a unique angle: that it factor that makes it special. Humor is a draw, especially in nonfiction and, double-points if the book reads like fiction, too. So set aside the baking soda volcanoes and egg drop tests to read some of these humorous science books.

funny science books for teens
collage photos CC via Flickr user hine

Guinea Pig Scientists : Bold Self-Experimenters in Science and Medicine by Mel Boring, Leslie Dendy, and C.B. Mordan 

This book showcases a handful of scientists who advanced medicine by first starting with themselves, then others, then animals, until their theories were proved. Tenacity was the key for all of these innovators of such things as laughing gas or what caused yellow fever. Now we know!  

How to Fake a Moon Landing: Exposing the Myths of Science Denial by Darryl Cunningham

Useful for any STEM curriculum this graphic novel is for conspiracy theorists, science buffs, and graphic novel fans. It discusses topics like autism and vaccines to fracking. For many teens, some of the topics will build new knowledge. Continue reading Booklist: Scientifically Funny Nonfiction

Science and Tech in Young Adult Literature

How do things fall apart? What so often determines who has the upper hand? Who has the ability to change things? With great power comes great responsibility, and time and time again, we see technology as creating a divide between the haves and the have nots. Scientific endeavor can lead to catastrophe.

Consider the technological terrors of the arena in The Hunger Games. Tracker jackers are genetically modified wasps whose venom can cause delirium and death. The Gamemakers can place muttations in the path of the tributes at will. The elements are controlled from a series of consoles for the entertainment of the masses. And before the rebellion was put down, jabberjays repeated the plans of the Resistance to Capitol ears.

Yet, we must also acknowledge that, when the rebels learned what the Capitol was doing, they started to feed the jabberjays lies. When the genetically engineered birds were abandoned, they bred with mockingbirds, creating mockingjays, which had the attributes of both jabberjays and mockingbirds. The rebels made use of the new breed, and while they were initially defeated, they still triumphed in an important way. The Capitol’s own technology was used against them. Technology can be used to gain the advantage, but it can also work against those it initially empowers.

Continue reading Science and Tech in Young Adult Literature