Fall 2014 Issue of YALS Now Available Online!

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The digital version of the Fall 2014 issue of YALS is now available under the “Members Only” section of the YALSA website. Please note that you will have to sign into your ALA account to access the issue.

The Future of Teens and Libraries (Fall 2014)

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futures report coverIn January 2013 YALSA published their report, The Future of Teens and Libraries: A Call to Action. The publication of that report launched a variety of YALSA activities as well as gave those serving teens in libraries an opportunity to try new things, re-envision their work, advocate for high-quality sustainable teen services and more. The fall 2014 issue of YALS covers success stories that resulted from the ideas published in YALSA’s report.

The Fall 2014 issue of YALS includes an article by members of the Future of Libraries for and with Teens YALSA Task Force. The group was initiated as a way to help library staff working with teens implement many of the ideas in the “Futures” report. Continue reading

Access YALS Digitally!

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YALS subscribers will now be able to access a digital version of each future YALS issue via the “Members Only” section of the YALSA website. Please note that you will need to be logged into your ALA account in order to view the page.

Currently, the Summer 2014 issue is available for access. As each digital issue becomes available, announcements will be made via this site so please stay tuned for updates!

Resources for Serving Homeless LGBTQ Teens (Fall 2014)

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In the fall 2014 issue of YALS – with the theme Yes I Can! – Julie Winkelstein and Jama Shelton give readers insights into the importance of working with homeless LGBTQ teens. The authors also put together the following list of resources for library staff to use when learning more about the topic and implementing services to the population.

Nationwide, around-the-clock suicide prevention helpline for LGBTQ youth: 866.488.7386

On the Web
Family Acceptance Project
This project offers excellent resources on families and acceptance of their LGBTQ children. The information could be used for a family program at the library. An excellent place to start is with the video: “Always My Son.” Other resources include research, free publications, and news. Libraries are not mentioned – but they could be and should be.

Forty to None Project
This project raises awareness about and addresses LGBTQ youth homelessness. It has great resources for parents, youth, teachers and service providers.
Continue reading

Fall 2014 YALS: Yes I Can!

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fall 2014 YALS coverThe fall 2014 issue of YALS will land in member and subscriber mailboxes very soon. The theme of the issue is Yes I Can! The journal is filled with articles about the ways in which library staff and community partners are working to move into the future. And, it’s very much the future outlined in the YALSA Report, The Future of Library Services for and with Teens: A Call to Action.

In this issue of the journal readers have the chance to:

  • Learn about the work of YALSA’s Future of Library Services for and with Teens Task Force and how their work can help you better serve teens in the community.
  • Find out how OK middle school librarian Amanda Kordeliski worked in her state to hold a summit where library staff from across the state had the chance to plan for future services for and with teens. Continue reading

Coming Soon: Connecting & Collecting the Spring 2014 Issue of YALS

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spring 2014 issue of YALS cover - connecting and collecting In about a week YALS subscribers and YALSA members will find the newest issue of YALS in their mailboxes. The theme of the issue is Connecting and Collecting and feature articles on:

  • How the Weinberg Foundation is helping to re-invent Baltimore Public School libraries by providing funding to re-envision space, collections and staffing at elementary and middle school libraries.
  • The amazing ways that library staff working with teens have used Best Buy funding to develop technology-based programming for and with teens. Continue reading

Best of the Best 2014 (Spring 2014)

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They were announced at Midwinter 2014 – YALSA’s awards and lists. Now you can download reproducibles for each of the lists and customize them for your own library. We’ve got them right here on the YALS site. You can download each of the lists separately, OR, there’s even a file that contains all of the lists in one handy place. Check them all out below (all files in pdf):

Learn more about all of YALSA’s awards and lists on the association website and in the spring 2014 issue of YALS.

Tech & Learning for Library Staff: A YALSA Badges Case Study (Winter 2014)

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communications, marketing, outreach badgeMany readers know about the YALSA Badges for Lifelong Learning project. But, in case you missed the information about it, the association has been working for a couple of years to develop a curriculum and online system that provides library staff working with teens – not just teen librarians – the opportunity to gain skills and knowledge to help them succeed in their work. In December YALSA launched a beta version of the system they developed which focuses on learning plans that help staff gain skills in three areas of YALSA’s Competencies for Librarians Serving Youth – Communication, Outreach, and Marketing; Leadership and Professionalism; and Access to Information.

The process of developing the learning management system and the activities that library staff would complete in order to earn badges provided YALSA with opportunities to think about exactly what staff needed to know in order to be successful with teens. It also helped those working on the badges better understand what badging is all about and how to help others understand what badging is all about. The key is the badge is the representation of the learning, it’s not the learning itself. A successful badging system for anyone – adults or teens or children – requires a lot of thought about what makes successful learning. What is required in order to evaluate learning experiences. And, what is required in order to be successful in earning a badge.

Anyone can now learn about the YALSA badges, the process the badge development team went through in developing the learning, and the outcomes reached in a case study published by Mozilla and HASTAC. You can also read about other badging projects.

Relax and HOMAGO! (Winter 2014)

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Jennifer Larson, Youth Services Manager at St. Paul Public Library, wants the teens at her library’s new Learning Lab to Hang Out, Mess Around, and Geek Out. This is the HOMAGO theory of learning based on solid research and used by most of the labs in the YOUMedia network. The basis of HOMAGO is that youth will learn better in an environment where they can hang out and ease into an activity before the training or lesson begins. In the current issue of YALS, you can read all about the St. Paul program, their partnership with the city’s Parks and Recreation department, and the nuts and bolts of their Createch Lab. For more information on YOUMedia, visit their website.

Every Teen Deserves a Place in the Library (Winter 2014)

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image by NYCDOTMany teens find that they are categorized by their peers, friends, teachers, and even family members. They might find they are thought of as goth or jock or overachieving or underserved.

Being professionals serving teens means making sure to serve all teens no matter what category they place themselves in, or are placed in by others.

The Future of Library Services for and with Teens: A Call to Action, published by YALSA, offers a look into information focusing on how we need to serve all teens today and tomorrow. Some of the quotes that jumped out at me as highlighting this need to actively work towards serving as many teens as possible include:

  • “There are currently 74.2 million children under the age of eighteen in the united States; 46% of them are children of color.” p. 2
  • “Today more than one-fifth of America’s children are immigrants or children of immigrants.” p. 2
  • “The number of unemployed youth ages 16-24 is currently 22.7%, an all-time high.” p.2
  • “More than 1.3 million children and teens experience homelessness each year.” Family alcohol /drug abuse, physical/sexual abuse, teen pregnancy, and homosexuality are reasons for them leaving. p.2
  • “Issues like poverty, homelessness, failing schools, and bullying have physical and psychological ramifications for teens.” p. 4 Continue reading