YALSA Perspectives – Badges for Lifelong Learning (Fall 2012 Issue)

In each issue of YALS at least one article is dedicated to giving readers information on YALSA’s current initiatives. In this YALS post we’d like to give readers information on YALSA’s badging project – a project funded by the MacArthur Foundation; Mozilla; and the Humanities, Arts, Sciences and Technology Advanced Collaboratory (HASTAC). The monies give YALSA the chance to develop a set of badges to help those working with teens in libraries gain skills and knowledge. The badges, which will launch in the spring, focus on the seven competencies covered in YALSA’s Competencies for Librarians Serving Youth.

You might wonder, what are badges and why should I care? We’ve got some answers for you in this podcast with me, Matthew Moffett – YALSA’s Podcast Manager, and association Board member Sarah Sogigian.


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Combining Advocacy and Marketing (Fall 2012 Issue)

Sometimes it’s hard to separate advocacy from marketing. Advocacy should focus on the why of what we do for teens. Why the services we provide to adolescents are valuable. Marketing is about selling what we do. The how and when of services to teens. There is overlap between the two and there are ways to combine them to better inform community members, and get the word out, about what you do and why you do it.

It’s easy to forget how important displays are in advocacy and marketing. Displays bring people into the collection, perhaps highlighting books they didn’t know (or had forgotten). They show the breadth of the collection and the range of expertise involved in curating books. They help demonstrate the value of the library to teens because they show the range of what the library can provide. Don’t forget that displays don’t have to just be about books: they can include artifacts, newspapers, local crafts, photographs and more. This helps to market the wide-array of resources libraries connect teens to and shows the library as being more than about books – which helps to advocate for teen services beyond the traditional focus of libraries.
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Teen Space Feature, Plymouth District Library (Fall 2012 Issue)

In the Fall 2012 issue of YALS, youth services librarian Katherine Trouern-Trend takes a look at the new National Teen Space Guidelines from the Young Adult Library Services Association. These guidelines were created in 2011-2012 by a task force and adopted by YALSA’s board of directors in May. Several libraries were included as model spaces. We asked some of them to share photos and information about their spaces and will be featuring them in the coming weeks.

This week’s featured teen space is the Teen Zone at Plymouth District Library in Plymouth, Michigan.

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What Does it Mean to Advocate Throughout the Day? (Fall 2012 Issue)

The fall issue of YALS focuses on advocacy with four articles featuring helpful, hands-on tips for librarians who work with teens. In her article on how great teen librarians make great library advocates, Maureen Hartman talks about building partnerships in the community in order to advocate for teens and the services for them. Heather Gruenthal covers the A to Z of being a teen advocate in a school library. What about advocating every hour of the work-day with and for teens? Is that possible too?

In the YALSA book, Being a Teen Library Services Advocate I talk about 24/7 advocacy and include an hourly overview of what a library staff member serving teens might work on during the day and how each activity can include an advocacy piece. The overview looks like this (You can zoom in or pop-open the pdf file to get a better view.):
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