Words from a Teen on Serving LGBTQ Youth (Fall 2014)

teen advisory group photo at Vancouver Public LibraryAfter recently reading Dr. Jama Shelton and Dr. Julie Winkelstein’s YALS article (Fall, 2014), Librarians and Social Workers: Working Together for Homeless LGBTQ Youth, I was stunned by the appalling statistic cited in the first line of the article. Although LGBTQ youth make up only 5-7 % of the general youth population, up to 40% of homeless youth are LGBTQ. Many of these homeless youth spend long hours in public libraries. Libraries provide a relatively safe haven and allow them access to much-needed information about social services. But libraries have long struggled with how to handle homeless patrons and these teens fear that they will be stigmatized if they spend an inordinate amount of time in the library. Many of them are over 18 years old, which means, in many libraries, they are no longer eligible for young adult services.

So what can librarians do to address this powerful need? The article by Shelton and Winkelstein cites 11 strategies to help homeless LGBTQ youth. One of the most powerful strategies is to be a visible advocate within our communities for LGBTQ youth. Last year, I volunteered to be part of an initiative in my library to reach out to LGBTQ youth in my community. My first step was to contact the high school GSA (Gay Straight Alliance) to make a connection and offer them the library’s support. Through that first connection, I met Logan Sherman, a high school senior and transgender person. I contacted Logan recently to ask if he could share his experience with homeless LGBTQ youth. Here’s what Logan said:
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Backwards Design: A Goal Oriented Model for Teen Services (Fall 2013)

riding a horse backwards by flickr creative commons user kennymaticIt may seem counterintuitive for a program to be designed “backwards,” but this model for programming focuses on setting goals, including learning objectives and assessments, and then moves to designing the activities that focus on reaching the goals.

Such an intentional programming model is becoming increasingly popular in public libraries, as the emphasis in programming shifts from random recreational programs to programs that promote learning and the goals of the library for young adult services. You may think this takes the fun out of programming. However, using this model, Cuyahoga County Public Library designed a Lego Mindstorms robotics program that was a huge hit with youth in their communities. Legos and robotics are definitely fun!

For more details about this programming model, take a look at “Intentionally Backwards, the Future of Learning in Libraries,” by Sarah Kepple in the Fall edition of YALS.

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