Not As Crazy As It Seems (Winter 2015)

cover for wintergirlsIn the winter 2015 issue of YALS, Diane Scrofano’s article on the portrayal of mental illness in YA literature provides an excellent overview of what exists, where there are gaps, and what the future holds. Below are the titles that Diane includes in her article, along with the mental illness focal point of the novel, and a link to information about each title on Amazon.

Teens & Tech (Winter 2015)

winter 2015 YALS coverIf it hasn’t arrived already, the winter 2015 issue of YALS should be in YALSA member and YALS subscriber’s mailboxes any day now. The theme of the issue is Teens and Tech and covers a variety of topics related to this year’s Teen Tech Week. The issue also launches a new section of the journal titled #act4teens. The section focuses on the ways in which libraries, community partners, library schools and others are supporting the ideas of YALSA’s Future of Libraries for and with Teens: A Call to Action. Here’s a bit more about what’s inside the winter 2015 issue:

  • In the YALSA Perspectives section of the issue Katherine Trouern-Trend discusses the work of YALSA’s National Guidelines Oversight Committee and how the group is working to support members in putting the Guidelines into practice. Guidelines the Committee is working with include YALSA’s Space Planning Guidelines and the Public Library Evaluation Tool. Read the article to learn more about how you can use these to improve and/or enhance library service to teens in the community. Continue reading

How Are YOU Using the YALSA Futures Report (Fall 2014)

cover of fall 2014 issue of YALSThe fall 2014 issue of YALS highlights the many exciting ways that libraries around the country are integrating the ideas of YALSA’s Future of Library for and With Teens: A Call to Action report. The report focuses on why and how libraries need to move forward in order to support the current needs of teens. It looks at teen demographics, societal trends, workforce and digital literacy needs of young adults, and more in order to provide library staff with what they need in order to be successful working with teens today and tomorrow. In the year since the report was released, school and public libraries have developed, re-vamped, and re-envisioned programs and services for and with teens in order to serve the age group in the ways the YALSA report recommends.

Now is your chance to let us know how you are using the ideas of the “Futures” report in your library work. Fill out and submit the How I #act4teens form. (#act4teens is the hashtag YALSA created to highlight the great things library staff are doing for and with teens that demonstrate moving into the future of library service for the age group.)

The submissions will be reviewed and some of the information collected will be featured in future issues of YALS. And/or included in posts on this YALS site.

The Library is an Idea Not a Building (Fall 2014)

yalsa futures report coverReading through the articles in the fall 2014 issue of YALS I’m once again struck about the new role that libraries and library staff play in serving the community. That role is one that takes library staff out of their buildings into schools AND a wide-array of community partner locations from homeless shelters to parks to community centers to meals sites to….. Thinking about that external focus and external connections that libraries have with their communities I more and more see that the library is an idea and not a physical space.

I think about the need to focus on the library as more than a physical space every time I hear someone say, “Let’s go talk to teens at the community center so that then they will come into the library to see us.” Or when I see that what library staff bring to outreach events, are materials that require teens, and others, to come into the library. To be honest I cringe a little bit when I hear those statements and see those focus points at outreach events. Why do we have to be so place focused?
Continue reading

The Future of Teens and Libraries (Fall 2014)

futures report coverIn January 2013 YALSA published their report, The Future of Teens and Libraries: A Call to Action. The publication of that report launched a variety of YALSA activities as well as gave those serving teens in libraries an opportunity to try new things, re-envision their work, advocate for high-quality sustainable teen services and more. The fall 2014 issue of YALS covers success stories that resulted from the ideas published in YALSA’s report.

The Fall 2014 issue of YALS includes an article by members of the Future of Libraries for and with Teens YALSA Task Force. The group was initiated as a way to help library staff working with teens implement many of the ideas in the “Futures” report. Continue reading

Resources for Serving Homeless LGBTQ Teens (Fall 2014)

Fall 2014 YALS: Yes I Can!

fall 2014 YALS coverThe fall 2014 issue of YALS will land in member and subscriber mailboxes very soon. The theme of the issue is Yes I Can! The journal is filled with articles about the ways in which library staff and community partners are working to move into the future. And, it’s very much the future outlined in the YALSA Report, The Future of Library Services for and with Teens: A Call to Action.

In this issue of the journal readers have the chance to:

  • Learn about the work of YALSA’s Future of Library Services for and with Teens Task Force and how their work can help you better serve teens in the community.
  • Find out how OK middle school librarian Amanda Kordeliski worked in her state to hold a summit where library staff from across the state had the chance to plan for future services for and with teens. Continue reading

Coming Soon: Connecting & Collecting the Spring 2014 Issue of YALS

spring 2014 issue of YALS cover - connecting and collecting In about a week YALS subscribers and YALSA members will find the newest issue of YALS in their mailboxes. The theme of the issue is Connecting and Collecting and feature articles on:

  • How the Weinberg Foundation is helping to re-invent Baltimore Public School libraries by providing funding to re-envision space, collections and staffing at elementary and middle school libraries.
  • The amazing ways that library staff working with teens have used Best Buy funding to develop technology-based programming for and with teens. Continue reading

Best of the Best 2014 (Spring 2014)

They were announced at Midwinter 2014 – YALSA’s awards and lists. Now you can download reproducibles for each of the lists and customize them for your own library. We’ve got them right here on the YALS site. You can download each of the lists separately, OR, there’s even a file that contains all of the lists in one handy place. Check them all out below (all files in pdf):

Learn more about all of YALSA’s awards and lists on the association website and in the spring 2014 issue of YALS.

Tech & Learning for Library Staff: A YALSA Badges Case Study (Winter 2014)

communications, marketing, outreach badgeMany readers know about the YALSA Badges for Lifelong Learning project. But, in case you missed the information about it, the association has been working for a couple of years to develop a curriculum and online system that provides library staff working with teens – not just teen librarians – the opportunity to gain skills and knowledge to help them succeed in their work. In December YALSA launched a beta version of the system they developed which focuses on learning plans that help staff gain skills in three areas of YALSA’s Competencies for Librarians Serving Youth – Communication, Outreach, and Marketing; Leadership and Professionalism; and Access to Information.

The process of developing the learning management system and the activities that library staff would complete in order to earn badges provided YALSA with opportunities to think about exactly what staff needed to know in order to be successful with teens. It also helped those working on the badges better understand what badging is all about and how to help others understand what badging is all about. The key is the badge is the representation of the learning, it’s not the learning itself. A successful badging system for anyone – adults or teens or children – requires a lot of thought about what makes successful learning. What is required in order to evaluate learning experiences. And, what is required in order to be successful in earning a badge.

Anyone can now learn about the YALSA badges, the process the badge development team went through in developing the learning, and the outcomes reached in a case study published by Mozilla and HASTAC. You can also read about other badging projects.