Minecraft and the Library (Winter 2013)

Minecraft image by Flickr Creative Commons User elias daniel.In the winter issue of YALS Jessica Schneider and and Erica Gauquier discuss how they brought Minecraft to teens at the Darien Library in Connecticut. Their article highlights the ways in which library staff and teens can work together to build programs and to support a wide-range of teen interests and needs through technology.

What is Minecraft? As Erica and Jessica describe it in their article:

Minecraft is a like a virtual and ongoing game of legos. Players mine for necessary materials in order to thrive in the game. You simply move blocks and build upon them gathering supplies as you go. As a player gets better and gains wood from trees, wool from sheep, meat from pigs, and diamonds from the earth, the possibilities for gathering new materials and resources becomes greater. The game can get even more complicated if you are so inclined, allowing players to create their own modifications (mods)- which leads to learning essential programming skills.

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YALSA’s National Forum on Teens and Libraries (Winter 2013)

YALSA National Forum on Libraries and Teens logoThe winter issue of YALS includes an article on the YALSA Forum on Teens and Libraries. At the time of the issue’s publication the summit, discussed in the article, was just taking place. The summit brought together a group of people from inside and outside of libraries to consider the future of libraries. Participants included library administrators, library staff working directly with teens, educators, publishers, members of the technology community, teen advocates, youth development experts, and more. (You can see the full list of participants.) It was an amazing group who spent two full days thinking about the world of teens and how libraries, and other youth serving organizations, can support those needs.

Some of the major themes that came out of the two days include: Continue reading

Talking to Stakeholders About Social Media (Winter 2013)

In the winter 2013 issue of YALS, Alida Hanson talks about the value of connecting with stakeholders to help them understand the importance of using social media in services to teens (particularly in school libraries). There are several resources YALS readers might find useful when investigating how to make these stakeholder connections:

American Association of School Librarians. White Paper on Educational Technology in Schools.

boyd, danah. The Power of Fear in Networked Publics.
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Autism? There’s an App for That (Winter 2013)

The winter 2013 issue of YALS is all about teens and tech. In her article on apps for teens on the autism spectrum, Renee McGrath, Manager of Youth Services for the Nassau Library System (Long Island, NY), writes about a variety of apps and covers apps helpful in organizing life, apps that aid in literacy and learning, and apps that are fun and relieve stress. Links to all of the apps discussed in the article are available below.

Social Skills and Apps for Daily Living

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What Does it Mean to Advocate Throughout the Day? (Fall 2012 Issue)

The fall issue of YALS focuses on advocacy with four articles featuring helpful, hands-on tips for librarians who work with teens. In her article on how great teen librarians make great library advocates, Maureen Hartman talks about building partnerships in the community in order to advocate for teens and the services for them. Heather Gruenthal covers the A to Z of being a teen advocate in a school library. What about advocating every hour of the work-day with and for teens? Is that possible too?

In the YALSA book, Being a Teen Library Services Advocate I talk about 24/7 advocacy and include an hourly overview of what a library staff member serving teens might work on during the day and how each activity can include an advocacy piece. The overview looks like this (You can zoom in or pop-open the pdf file to get a better view.):
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Hone Your Advocacy Skills Alphabetically (Fall 2012 Issue)

In the fall issue of YALS, with the theme of advocacy, Heather Gruenthal’s article, A School Library Advocacy Alphabet, provides readers with a wealth of information on how school library staff (and others that work with teens actually) can advocate for their libraries and for teens every day of the year. Heather covers the meaning of advocacy, the importance of branding, collaboration, telling your story, elevator pitches, and even why photocopying is important. She also provides a really useful list of resources for anyone to use to learn about advocacy and learn how to hone their advocacy skills. Here’s what’s on her list:

Hennepin County Library Speaks Advocacy Through Video (Fall 2012 Issue)

The Fall 2012 issue of YALS includes an article by Maureen Hartman (Coordinating Librarian for Youth Literacy and Learning at the Hennepin County Library) titled Good Teen Librarians Make Great Library Advocates. The article focuses on the ways library staff working with teens can build relationships and partnerships in order to advocate successfully for the age group. Not only are staff at the Hennepin County Library building collaborations, partnerships, and relationships they are also producing videos to help get the word out about the importance of serving teens in libraries.


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Cultivating Latino Cultural Literacy

Pura Belpré Award-Winning Books in Library Programming for Teens and Tweens

By Jamie Campbell Naidoo

The following article appears in the Spring 2012 issue of Young Adult Library Services. Booklists and a full set of references can be found there.

Established in 1996 by the National Association to Promote Library and Information Services to Latinos and the Spanish Speaking (REFORMA) and the Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC), the Pura Belpré Award recognizes Latino authors and illustrators “whose work best portrays, affirms, and celebrates the Latino cultural experience in an outstanding work of literature for children and youth.” The award’s namesake, the first Puerto Rican librarian in the New York Public Library system, was dedicated to bringing rich stories imbued with Latino cultural elements to the children and youth that she served in barrios and ethnically diverse neighborhoods throughout the city from  the 1920s and 1930s and later in the 1960s and 1970s. In 2011, the Pura Belpré Award celebrated its quinceanera, marking fifteen years of works that carry on the mission first started by that energetic and visionary librarian so long ago.

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Evildoings, Deadly Exes, and Rock and Roll!

Read- and Listen-Alikes Supporting the Fabulous Films for Young Adults 2012 List

by the Fabulous Films for Young Adults Committee

The following article appears in the Spring 2012 issue of Young Adult Library Services.

YALSA’s Fabulous Films for Young Adults 2012 list has been announced! The 2012 theme was “Song and Dance,” and over the ten-month nomination period, committee members, fellow librarians, YALSA members, and teens nominated more than one hundred titles. The committee was pleased and surprised to see that nominators found many ways to interpret our theme, and we selected the best of the best films that would appeal to young adults ages 12–18. The committee is especially pleased to have selected titles that will enhance library collections as well as support young adult programming.

Our committee’s function is to annually select films especially significant to young adults from those currently available for purchase. The committee is then charged to prepare one annotated list, based on the chosen theme, of at least ten and no more than twenty-five recommended titles. The Fabulous Films for Young Adults list is tangible evidence that YALSA believes moving images play an important role in the life of a young adult.
Some titles present beloved tales, while others take on social issues that span the past and present. Still other films offer fun, catchy songs and conversations that will have you singing and quoting your way through the stacks.

To support our list, the committee has created a list of read/listen alikes that will enhance your collection and programming.

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