What If? (Fall 2012 Issue)

The fall issue of YALS has the theme of advocacy. Along with articles on a wide-range of advocacy topics there are also features on topics such as teen library spaces and 21st century trends.

photo courtesy of Flickr user dan centuryIn her article on 21st century trends, Sarah C. Malin looks at trends in education, social connections, and civic engagement and considers the role that libraries play in those areas. Those serving teens should be looking at what’s coming next in these areas in order to make sure they are ready to serve teens of tomorrow.

That looking forward can be hard to do. Here are some tips for staying on top of what’s next so you can be ready for what ifs:
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YALSA Perspectives – Badges for Lifelong Learning (Fall 2012 Issue)

In each issue of YALS at least one article is dedicated to giving readers information on YALSA’s current initiatives. In this YALS post we’d like to give readers information on YALSA’s badging project – a project funded by the MacArthur Foundation; Mozilla; and the Humanities, Arts, Sciences and Technology Advanced Collaboratory (HASTAC). The monies give YALSA the chance to develop a set of badges to help those working with teens in libraries gain skills and knowledge. The badges, which will launch in the spring, focus on the seven competencies covered in YALSA’s Competencies for Librarians Serving Youth.

You might wonder, what are badges and why should I care? We’ve got some answers for you in this podcast with me, Matthew Moffett – YALSA’s Podcast Manager, and association Board member Sarah Sogigian.


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Combining Advocacy and Marketing (Fall 2012 Issue)

Sometimes it’s hard to separate advocacy from marketing. Advocacy should focus on the why of what we do for teens. Why the services we provide to adolescents are valuable. Marketing is about selling what we do. The how and when of services to teens. There is overlap between the two and there are ways to combine them to better inform community members, and get the word out, about what you do and why you do it.

It’s easy to forget how important displays are in advocacy and marketing. Displays bring people into the collection, perhaps highlighting books they didn’t know (or had forgotten). They show the breadth of the collection and the range of expertise involved in curating books. They help demonstrate the value of the library to teens because they show the range of what the library can provide. Don’t forget that displays don’t have to just be about books: they can include artifacts, newspapers, local crafts, photographs and more. This helps to market the wide-array of resources libraries connect teens to and shows the library as being more than about books – which helps to advocate for teen services beyond the traditional focus of libraries.
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Teen Space Feature, Plymouth District Library (Fall 2012 Issue)

In the Fall 2012 issue of YALS, youth services librarian Katherine Trouern-Trend takes a look at the new National Teen Space Guidelines from the Young Adult Library Services Association. These guidelines were created in 2011-2012 by a task force and adopted by YALSA’s board of directors in May. Several libraries were included as model spaces. We asked some of them to share photos and information about their spaces and will be featuring them in the coming weeks.

This week’s featured teen space is the Teen Zone at Plymouth District Library in Plymouth, Michigan.

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What Does it Mean to Advocate Throughout the Day? (Fall 2012 Issue)

The fall issue of YALS focuses on advocacy with four articles featuring helpful, hands-on tips for librarians who work with teens. In her article on how great teen librarians make great library advocates, Maureen Hartman talks about building partnerships in the community in order to advocate for teens and the services for them. Heather Gruenthal covers the A to Z of being a teen advocate in a school library. What about advocating every hour of the work-day with and for teens? Is that possible too?

In the YALSA book, Being a Teen Library Services Advocate I talk about 24/7 advocacy and include an hourly overview of what a library staff member serving teens might work on during the day and how each activity can include an advocacy piece. The overview looks like this (You can zoom in or pop-open the pdf file to get a better view.):
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Teen Space Feature, Farmington Public Library’s Teen Zone (Fall 2012 Issue)

In the Fall 2012 issue of YALS, youth services librarian Katherine Trouern-Trend takes a look at the new National Teen Space Guidelines from the Young Adult Library Services Association. These guidelines were created in 2011-2012 by a task force and adopted by YALSA’s board of directors in May. Several libraries were included as model spaces. We asked some of them to share photos and information about their spaces and will be featuring them in the coming weeks.

This week’s featured teen space is the Teen Zone from Farmington Public Library in Farmington, NM. David Florez, the library’s Teen Zone Coordinator, shared some information and pictures of the space.

“Located in the Four Corners area of the American Southwest, the Farmington Public Library serves a culturally diverse population of approximately 110,000, with a collection consisting of more than 190,000 books, e-books, periodicals and multimedia titles and is home to the Teen Zone social space.

Teens at the Farmington Public Library meet with Paul Volponi through Skype.

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10 Quick Tips for Advocacy (Fall 2012 Issue)

The fall issue of YALS focuses on advocacy. There are several articles with tips to help library staff serving teens advocate for what they do. As a companion to those articles, YALS asked Christian Zabriskie to let us know his 10 tips for successful advocacy efforts. Christian is a member of the Board of Directors of YALSA, is the CEO of Urban Librarians Unite, and is the Co-author of Grassroots Library Advocacy: A Special Report available from ALA Editions.

  1. Know Who To Talk to and When: Who are the decision makers you need to influence and when will they be making their decisions? There is no point harassing people who cannot give you what you want and even the right people might be useful to you for a short window of time. Do some homework so you don’t waste your time and energy before talking to the right person at the right time. Continue reading

Teen Space Feature, Waupaca Area Public Library’s Best Cellar (Fall 2012 Issue)

In the Fall 2012 issue of YALS, youth services librarian Katherine Trouern-Trend takes a look at the new National Teen Space Guidelines from the Young Adult Library Services Association. These guidelines were created in 2011-2012 by a task force and adopted by YALSA’s board of directors in May. Several libraries were included as model spaces. We asked some of them to share photos and information about their spaces and will be featuring them in the coming weeks.

Rebecca Wisniewski from the Waupaca Area Public Library shared some of the highlights of the library’s teen space, The Best Cellar.

“The Best Cellar at the Waupaca Area Public Library opened to the teens of the Waupaca area in April 2006, following four years of extensive planning, fund-raising and grant writing. The new design was a much-welcomed improvement over the converted storage room that had been serving as the teen space.

The Best Cellar is well-utilized by teen patrons who frequent the library. They come to select materials for checkout, log on to the internet computers, play on the Wii and PlayStation 2, grab a snack, participate in programs, or just hang out with their friends. The use of the internet computers and the Wii are by far the most popular activities that the teens engage in on a daily basis. They also like being able to purchase and enjoy affordable snacks while spending time in the Best Cellar. The snacks are supplied by the Student Library Advisory Group (SLAG) and the proceeds go toward maintaining and improving the teen space as well as supporting teen programming.”

The Best Cellar showing central room area in foreground, Nonfiction and DVD shelves in background

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Advocacy Across ALA (Fall 2012 Issue)

The fall issue of YALS focuses on advocacy with four articles featuring helpful, hands-on tips for librarians who work with teens. We posted several online resources from Heather Gruenthal’s article, A School Library Advocacy Alphabet, a few weeks ago. Heather’s article included a host of YALSA advocacy resources that are definitely worth checking out:

Below is a selection of even more resources to help with your advocacy efforts, collected from across the American Library Association and its divisions.

Association-Wide Resources

  • @ Your Library: The Campaign for America’s Libraries is ALA’s public awareness campaign that promotes the value of libraries and librarians. Includes a variety of tools and resources to use in your library and community.
  • ILoveLibraries.org: This website, developed by ALA, provides news and information, as well as opportunities to become involved in library advocacy.
  • National Library Promotions and Events: A listing of the promotions throughout the year that libraries of all types all across the country can get involved with to promote libraries and create awareness of library issues. Continue reading

Teen Space Feature, Tacoma Public Library’s StoryLab (Fall 2012 Issue)

In the Fall 2012 issue of YALS, youth services librarian Katherine Trouern-Trend takes a look at the new National Teen Space Guidelines from the Young Adult Library Services Association. These guidelines were created in 2011-2012 by a task force and adopted by YALSA’s board of directors in May. Several libraries were included as model spaces. We asked some of them to share photos and information about their spaces and will be featuring them in the coming weeks.

First up is the Tacoma Public Library in Tacoma, WA. Librarians Kristy Gale, Adam Brock, and Sara Sunshine Holloway offer a peek into their teen space, StoryLab.

“The mission of StoryLab is to provide teens with the tools, resources and training to become skilled creators of digital media.

We live in a digital world. While the need for effective communication has not changed, what has changed are the tools. Age, economic background and location are no longer potential obstacles to anyone who wants to share ideas and tell stories. The new barriers are access to the tools that level the playing field, as well as the education to use those tools effectively.

The Tacoma Public Library began work on StoryLab in the spring of 2010 to address these barriers in our local community. The Library applied for and received a 3-year $150,000 grant from the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation to create StoryLab – a digital media lab at the downtown Main Library for teens and young adults that provides mentoring, training, equipment, software… all the tools and skills needed to excel in the new communication world. Teens can use StoryLab to write and record music, make a film, build a web site, illustrate stories and then animate them, design and print posters and brochures, or further develop their photography skills. Through StoryLab, the library offers free workshops with media professionals.”

Hip-hop recording artist, Q-Dot, taught a four week series on the art and craft of hip hop, beat production, lyric writing and the ins and outs of the music business.

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