Advocacy Across ALA (Fall 2012 Issue)

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The fall issue of YALS focuses on advocacy with four articles featuring helpful, hands-on tips for librarians who work with teens. We posted several online resources from Heather Gruenthal’s article, A School Library Advocacy Alphabet, a few weeks ago. Heather’s article included a host of YALSA advocacy resources that are definitely worth checking out:

Below is a selection of even more resources to help with your advocacy efforts, collected from across the American Library Association and its divisions.

Association-Wide Resources

  • @ Your Library: The Campaign for America’s Libraries is ALA’s public awareness campaign that promotes the value of libraries and librarians. Includes a variety of tools and resources to use in your library and community.
  • ILoveLibraries.org: This website, developed by ALA, provides news and information, as well as opportunities to become involved in library advocacy.
  • National Library Promotions and Events: A listing of the promotions throughout the year that libraries of all types all across the country can get involved with to promote libraries and create awareness of library issues.
  • Advocacy University: Information, courses, and tools to help library advocates make the case at the local level.
  • Empowering Voices, Transforming Communities: View webinar recordings from ALA Presidents on advocacy issues
  • Library Advocacy Webinars: Recordings of past online courses related to advocacy
  • Quotable Facts about America’s Libraries, 2012 edition: This advocacy tool has been updated with current research and a new “Technology Trends” section. These wallet-sized fold-out cards are packed with clever quotes to help you make the case for libraries. Free downloadable PDF or order 100 copies for $10.
  • Advocacy Fact Sheets

Office for Library Advocacy (OLA)
OLA supports the efforts of advocates seeking to improve libraries of all types by developing resources, a peer-to-peer advocacy network, and training for advocates at the local, state and national level.

Public Library Association (PLA)

  • Turning the Page: Online advocacy training for ALA and ALA/PLA members. All of the training is online and self-paced, and should take 12-15 hours to complete. It is ideal for beginner advocates. By the end of the training, you’ll have a complete Advocacy Work Plan to guide your efforts.

American Association of School Librarians (AASL)

Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC)

  • ALSC Advocacy and Public Awareness: A collection of mostly external resources to help with advocacy.
  • Communicate Value! Advocacy Training: Documents and tools from the advocacy presentation during the ALSC 2012 Midwinter Division Leadership Meeting. Julie Todaro facilitated, “Communicate Value!” to assist members with developing compelling messaging to assist with their advocacy efforts
  • Kids! @ your library: ALSC’s 2006-2010 public awareness campaign generated a tool kit filled with resources to help librarians position their library as a valuable and important community center for kids and their families. Although the campaign is no longer active, many of the tool kit resources are still relevant and valuable and can be found here.

United for Libraries

  • United for Libraries Advocacy Resources: A selection of advocacy resources, especially for friends of the library and other non-librarian supporters
  • Authors for Libraries: United for Libraries is bringing authors and libraries together in a unique partnership to connect authors with libraries, Friends of the Library groups, and library Foundations as well as to keep authors informed about issues and concerns affecting libraries on a national level.

Check out the fall issue of YALS for more content on advocating for high quality service to teens. If you are a YALSA member YALS is a perk of your membership dues. If not a member learn how to join, or learn how to subscribe.

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