How Are YOU Using the YALSA Futures Report (Fall 2014)

cover of fall 2014 issue of YALSThe fall 2014 issue of YALS highlights the many exciting ways that libraries around the country are integrating the ideas of YALSA’s Future of Library for and With Teens: A Call to Action report. The report focuses on why and how libraries need to move forward in order to support the current needs of teens. It looks at teen demographics, societal trends, workforce and digital literacy needs of young adults, and more in order to provide library staff with what they need in order to be successful working with teens today and tomorrow. In the year since the report was released, school and public libraries have developed, re-vamped, and re-envisioned programs and services for and with teens in order to serve the age group in the ways the YALSA report recommends.

Now is your chance to let us know how you are using the ideas of the “Futures” report in your library work. Fill out and submit the How I #act4teens form. (#act4teens is the hashtag YALSA created to highlight the great things library staff are doing for and with teens that demonstrate moving into the future of library service for the age group.)

The submissions will be reviewed and some of the information collected will be featured in future issues of YALS. And/or included in posts on this YALS site.

Fall 2014 YALS: Yes I Can!

fall 2014 YALS coverThe fall 2014 issue of YALS will land in member and subscriber mailboxes very soon. The theme of the issue is Yes I Can! The journal is filled with articles about the ways in which library staff and community partners are working to move into the future. And, it’s very much the future outlined in the YALSA Report, The Future of Library Services for and with Teens: A Call to Action.

In this issue of the journal readers have the chance to:

  • Learn about the work of YALSA’s Future of Library Services for and with Teens Task Force and how their work can help you better serve teens in the community.
  • Find out how OK middle school librarian Amanda Kordeliski worked in her state to hold a summit where library staff from across the state had the chance to plan for future services for and with teens. Continue reading

Every Teen Deserves a Place in the Library (Winter 2014)

image by NYCDOTMany teens find that they are categorized by their peers, friends, teachers, and even family members. They might find they are thought of as goth or jock or overachieving or underserved.

Being professionals serving teens means making sure to serve all teens no matter what category they place themselves in, or are placed in by others.

The Future of Library Services for and with Teens: A Call to Action, published by YALSA, offers a look into information focusing on how we need to serve all teens today and tomorrow. Some of the quotes that jumped out at me as highlighting this need to actively work towards serving as many teens as possible include:

  • “There are currently 74.2 million children under the age of eighteen in the united States; 46% of them are children of color.” p. 2
  • “Today more than one-fifth of America’s children are immigrants or children of immigrants.” p. 2
  • “The number of unemployed youth ages 16-24 is currently 22.7%, an all-time high.” p.2
  • “More than 1.3 million children and teens experience homelessness each year.” Family alcohol /drug abuse, physical/sexual abuse, teen pregnancy, and homosexuality are reasons for them leaving. p.2
  • “Issues like poverty, homelessness, failing schools, and bullying have physical and psychological ramifications for teens.” p. 4 Continue reading