The Future of Libraries & Teens – White Paper Open for Comments

national forum on libraries and teens logoThe fall 2013 issue of YALS compliments the work YALSA has been doing over the past year as a part of the IMLS-funded National Forum on Libraries and Teens. The outcome of the project is a white paper that outlines findings from the year-long project and helps libraries, stakeholders, teens, community members, and others to think about and envision the future of library service to adolescents.

For the next two weeks YALSA is making it possible for anyone, yes anyone, to comment on the draft of the white paper. That means you, and those you work with – both inside and outside of the library. The association wants to make sure that the paper resonates with those working in the field and sets out a view of the future that is clear and well-articulated. The authors are also looking for your, yes your, examples that can help to expand and support what’s included in the document.
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When Teen Read Week Leads to Questions (Summer 2013)

image of group research by Flickr user NWAPRGiven the increasing demands placed on today’s teens, people often wonder how much time young adults really have for recreational reading. Courtney Lewis, Director of Libraries at Wyoming Seminary College Preparatory School in Kingston, Pennsylvania, wondered what teens bought and read in their recreational time. In her article, “Seek the Unknown for Teen Read Week 2013: Using Action Research to Determine Recreational Habits of High School Students,” Courtney explains how she used Teen Read Week as an opportunity for finding out more about her library population.

Research is an important component of YALSA’s strategic plan and a key focus of the association’s year-long IMLS funded The Future of Libraries and Teens project. As YALSA’s work demonstrates (the association also developed a research agenda), learning about the reading interests and habits of teens is just one important area of the research library staff working with teens, and youth-oriented researchers, need to focus on. Action research and Courtney’s techniques, experience and suggestions can be adapted to any area that needs exploration. I asked a few YALSA members what they wanted to learn more about:

“When do teens like to read books in e-form and when do they like to read books in physical form?” Diane Fuller, Director of Libraries/Upper School Librarian at Gilman School, Baltimore, MD

“What mobile device do teens primarily use to read ebooks? Continue reading