Jukebooks: Divided We Fall by Trent Reedy

Divided We Fall by Trent ReedySeventeen-year-old Danny Wright had a plan for his future. It included fixing up a mechanics shop and making a decent life for himself and his high school sweetheart, JoBell. To get a little money to fund his dream, Danny signs up for the Idaho National Guard. That’s when his future gets seriously whacked.

The president of the United States has signed a bill that will require all U.S. citizens to carry a government ID card. The governor of Idaho disagrees with this law, calling it an invasion of privacy. Little does Danny suspect that when this disagreement heats to the point of violence, he will be the one to fire the first shot.

A major theme of the book is the definition of patriotism, as the people of Idaho are forced to choose between loyalty to their president or loyalty to their governor. As an antidote for this violent divisiveness, here’s Lee Greenwood’s classic, God Bless the USA. 

-Diane Colson, currently reading Vengeance by Megan Miranda

YALSA Election: An Interview with Printz Award Committee Candidate Rob Bittner

yalsa logoGet ready to vote! The YALSA election runs from March 19 through April 25, and to help you be an informed voter, we’re sharing interviews with each of the 2014 candidates for YALSA Award Committees.

This week we are focusing on the Michael L. Printz Award Committee, which honors the best book and up to four honor books written for teens, based entirely on literary merit, each year.

Candidates, who will be presented in alphabetical order, were asked to craft “Twitter-length” responses (i.e. around 140 characters). Full biographical information on all of the candidates can be found on the sample ballot.

Today we have an interview with Rob Bittner.

Continue reading YALSA Election: An Interview with Printz Award Committee Candidate Rob Bittner

Teen Tech Week: Building a Better Human

TTW14_featureslideMarch 9 – 15 is YALSA’s annual Teen Tech Week, when libraries shine a spotlight on all of the great technological tools that they offer for their patrons. And though this event only lasts for one week, technology is a core element of most libraries’ mission year round. More and more are offering digital labs and makerspaces where patrons can learn to use technology to create fantastic projects and give free rein to their imagination.

Photo by unloveablesteve. CC BY-NC-SA
Photo by unloveablesteve. CC BY-NC-SA

One of my favorite examples of this is the prosthetic Robohand that was recently created for a young boy using the 3-D printer at the Johnson County Library Makerspace. As soon as I read the story, it got me thinking about all of the great stories I have read about technology being used to augment the human body or even change what it means to be a person. And, so, in honor of Teen Tech Week, I decided to create a list of some of my favorite books about technology being used to augment the human body or fundamentally alter humanity as we currently conceive of it. Continue reading Teen Tech Week: Building a Better Human

Teen Tech Week: YA Lit Characters on Pinterest

TTW14_featureslideIn honor of YALSA’s Teen Tech Week, I wanted to imagine some YA book characters using one of my favorite social media tools: Pinterest. Pinterest is a great way to create nice looking collections of Web sites you want to remember or images that inspire you.

Some of my fellow Hub bloggers and I had fun getting creative with this– take a look at some of our boards inspired by a few books and series. Click on the links or the pictures to see more pins!

Geri Diorio’s page for Graffiti Moon by Cath Crowley

Graffiti Moon

  Continue reading Teen Tech Week: YA Lit Characters on Pinterest

YALSA Election: An Interview with Printz Award Committee Candidate Paige Battle

yalsa logoGet ready to vote! The YALSA election runs from March 19 through April 25, and to help you be an informed voter, we’re sharing interviews with each of the 2014 candidates for YALSA Award Committees.

This week we are focusing on the Michael L. Printz Award Committee, which honors the best book and up to four honor books written for teens, based entirely on literary merit, each year.

Candidates, who will be presented in alphabetical order, were asked to craft “Twitter-length” responses (i.e. around 140 characters). Full biographical information on all of the candidates can be found on the sample ballot.

Today we have an interview with Paige Battle.

Continue reading YALSA Election: An Interview with Printz Award Committee Candidate Paige Battle

Crafting and Creative Pursuits in YA Nonfiction and Fiction

photo by flickr user Tammy Strobel
photo by flickr user Tammy Strobel

March is National Craft Month!  I love crafting in many forms and have led craft workshops at the library system where I work.  Apart from reading, crafting is one of the few things that I can get completely lost in.  I think for me it started in middle school.  I had a bit of a rough time in eighth grade (a situation partly of my own creation), but always felt grounded by our arts and crafts class, where we explored several different art forms without being judged on the “quality” of our finished products.  In high school, I took a class in drawing and painting, sure at first that I would just eke by with a barely passing grade.  Instead, I ended up very pleasantly surprised at the sketches that I was able to make as the result of patient instruction and a little concentration.  As an adult I’ve taken jewelry-making and other craft classes, and have realized that crafting for me is almost a form of meditation, and I need to make more time for it in my life.  So to inspire myself as much as you, our Hub readers, I’ve put together a list of YA crafting guides and YA novels whose main characters craft in some form.

Continue reading Crafting and Creative Pursuits in YA Nonfiction and Fiction

YALSA Election: An Interview with Printz Award Committee Candidate Catherine Andronik

yalsa logoGet ready to vote! The YALSA election runs from March 19 through April 25, and to help you be an informed voter, we’re sharing interviews with each of the 2014 candidates for YALSA Award Committees.

This week we are focusing on the Michael L. Printz Award Committee, which honors the best book and up to four honor books written for teens, based entirely on literary merit, each year.

Candidates, who will be presented in alphabetical order, were asked to craft “Twitter-length” responses (i.e. around 140 characters). Full biographical information on all of the candidates can be found on the sample ballot.

Today we have an interview with Catherine Andronik.

Continue reading YALSA Election: An Interview with Printz Award Committee Candidate Catherine Andronik

The Monday Poll: Techie Teen Reads for Teen Tech Week

photo by flickr user Jeroen Bennink
photo by flickr user Jeroen Bennink

Good morning, Hub readers!

Last week, asked which YA book would make a great Broadway musical. Tim Federle’s Better Nate Than Ever was a runaway hit with 30% of your vote, followed by My Most Excellent Year by Steve Kluger (18%) and If I Stay by Gayle Forman (16%). Personally, I’d love to buy front-row seats for any of those choices! You can see detailed results for all of our previous polls in the Polls Archive. Thanks to all of you who voted!

This week, we’re celebrating Teen Tech Week! So we’d like you to weigh in on your favorite YA book that features technology. Vote in the poll below, or leave your suggestions in the comments.

[poll id=”139″]

2014 Hub Reading Challenge Check-in #5

Hub Reading Challenge logoNot signed up for YALSA’s 2014 Hub Reading Challenge? Read the official rules and sign up on the original post. Anything you’ve read since February 3 counts, so sign up now!

How is everyone doing on their reading for the Hub Reading Challenge? Have you read or listened to anything that you wouldn’t have otherwise tried? Did you finally get around to a book that has been on your To-Be-Read list for ages? Have you loved any book from the list? Let us know in the comments. One of the most fun parts of the Hub Reading Challenge is always hearing about everyone’s experience with the books and seeing how different readers react to the books on the list.

I confess I have only read a couple of books for the challenge so far, so don’t feel intimidated if you haven’t started yet! There is still time! You have until 11:59PM EST on June 22nd to finish all 25 books. Just be sure to keep track of your progress. We’ll be posting these check-in posts each week so you can talk about the book(s) you read/listen to that week and share links to your reviews online. If you just can’t wait for our weekly posts, feel free to share your thoughts on social media using the #hubchallenge hashtag, or join the 2014 Hub Challenge group on Goodreads. You can see some of the social media conversation below.

If you have already completed the challenge by reading or listening to 25 titles from the list of eligible books, be sure to fill out the form below so we can send you your Challenge Finisher badge, get in touch to coordinate your reader’s response, and, perhaps best of all, to notify you if you win our exciting grand prize drawing! Be sure to use an email you check frequently and do not fill out this form until you have completed the challenge by reading 25 titlesContinue reading 2014 Hub Reading Challenge Check-in #5

Tweets of the Week: March 7

Here’s some bookish news you might have missed:

Books:

Continue reading Tweets of the Week: March 7