The Monday Poll: Your Favorite Historical Fiction Heroines

Illustration from The Quiver of Love, courtesy of The British LibraryGood morning, Hub readers!

Last week, we asked about your favorite tech-related teen read, in honor of YALSA’s Teen Tech Week. The top choice, with 25% of the vote, was Ready Player One by Earnest Cline, followed closely by Feed by M.T. Anderson, which took 24% of the vote. Little Brother by Cory Doctorow garnered 16% of the vote, and you can see detailed results for all of our previous polls in the Polls Archive. Thanks to all of you who voted, and we hope you had a great Teen Tech Week!

This week, we’re turning our attention to the fact that March is Women’s History Month. As a tie-in to this important celebration of influential women through the ages, we’d like to hear who about favorite female characters in YA historical fiction. There are lots to choose from! Vote in the poll below, or leave your suggestions in the comments.

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The Monday Poll: Techie Teen Reads for Teen Tech Week

photo by flickr user Jeroen Bennink
photo by flickr user Jeroen Bennink

Good morning, Hub readers!

Last week, asked which YA book would make a great Broadway musical. Tim Federle’s Better Nate Than Ever was a runaway hit with 30% of your vote, followed by My Most Excellent Year by Steve Kluger (18%) and If I Stay by Gayle Forman (16%). Personally, I’d love to buy front-row seats for any of those choices! You can see detailed results for all of our previous polls in the Polls Archive. Thanks to all of you who voted!

This week, we’re celebrating Teen Tech Week! So we’d like you to weigh in on your favorite YA book that features technology. Vote in the poll below, or leave your suggestions in the comments.

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The Monday Poll: YA Lit Meant for Broadway

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photo by flickr user Andy Roberts

Good morning, Hub readers!

Last week, we asked to you weigh in on your favorite last line from YA literature. The majority of you- 35%, in fact- voted for short, sweet, and ambiguous: “Just three words long,” from Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell. (Whatever those three words are… swoon!) The last line of John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars (“I do, Augustus.  I do.”) came in second with 21% of the vote, followed by the concluding sentence of Me, Earl, and the Dying Girl by Jesse Andrews (“Honestly, I don’t know what the hell I’m talking about.”), with 15%. You can see detailed results for all of our previous polls in the Polls Archive. Thanks to all of you who voted!

Now, get your jazz hands ready– this week, we want to know which YA book would make a perfect Broadway musical.  There  are so many great YA books that involve the performing arts in some way– wouldn’t it be fun to see them come to life on stage, with big splashy dance numbers and fancy lighting cues? Vote in the poll below, or leave your suggestions in the comments!

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The Monday Poll: Best Last Lines

the_endGood morning, Hub readers!

Last week, in honor of Presidents’ Day, we asked you to choose the YA lit character you’d vote into the White House. The results just go to show that smart girls rule: 28% of you would vote E. Lockhart’s Frankie Landau-Banks for president, and 26% chose Suzanne Collin’s Katniss Everdeen as their ideal presidential candidate. Good looks and charisma also count for something, as Magnus Bane from Cassandra Clare’s books came in third with 14% of your vote. You can see detailed results for all of our previous polls in the Polls Archive. Thanks to all of you who voted!

This week, we’re revisiting a topic we polled you about a long, long time ago in the bygone days of 2011: the best last lines in YA fiction. Since this is an update of a previous poll, we’re sticking with books published after that poll was issued. Vote below, or leave your suggestions in the comments!

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The Monday Poll: YA Lit Characters for President!

The White House in 1846 - public domain image accessed at Wikimedia Commons Good morning, Hub readers!

Last week, we rounded out our Valentine’s Day polls by asking which romantic outcome from YA lit you’d like to change. Apparently freshly baked bread doesn’t win many hearts around here, because Suzanne Collins’ Hunger Games trilogy came in first with 34% of the vote. The Twilight saga by Stephenie Meyer followed closely with 32% of the vote, so Team Jacob is clearly still going strong. Finally, the Gemma Doyle trilogy by Libba Bray came in third with 16% of  the vote.  (Team No Tree?)  You can see detailed results for all of our previous polls in the Polls Archive. Thanks to all of you who voted and commented last week!

This week, we’re on to the next holiday– the United States is celebrating Presidents’ Day, so we want to know: which YA lit character would you vote into the Oval Office?  Your choice could be based on leadership ability, a commanding presence, admirable values, or sheer charisma. Actual qualifications don’t matter, since this is just for fun– so go nuts! Vote in the poll below, and feel free to campaign for your favorite in the comments.

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The Monday Poll: The YA Lit Couple You’d Change

heartGood morning, Hub readers!

Last week, we wanted to know which YA lit couple you’re most hoping will make it work. Even though the end of Rainbow Rowell’s Eleanor & Park was pretty conclusive, it looks like a lot of us are still concerned about this couple’s future– we really want them to make it work! Eleanor & Park pulled in 63% of the vote. In second place was Magnus and Alec from Cassandra Clare’s Mortal Instruments series, with 12% of the vote. The final book comes out this year, so maybe we’ll get some resolution! We also received a few great suggestions in the comments last week– Shari suggested Perry and Aria from Veronica Rossi’s sci-fi/fantasy Ever Night series, and Jenni wrote in with Harry and Craig from Two Boys Kissing and Liza and Annie from Annie on My Mind. You can see detailed results for all of our previous polls in the Polls Archive. Thanks to all of you who voted and commented!

This week, we’re continuing the romance theme in honor of Valentine’s Day a little early and asking another question about YA lit couples. You may have seen the news that J.K. Rowling expressed that  Harry and Hermione may have been a more compatible couple than Ron and Hermione. Whatever you think about this belated relevation, it opens up an interesting question to ponder: what romantic pairing in YA lit would you go back and change, if you could? In the interest of avoiding spoilers, we’re going to stick to book/series titles, rather than mentioning specific couples’ names. Vote in the poll below, and tell us in the comments if we missed something!

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The Monday Poll: YA Lit Couple You’re Pulling For

Hearts on our mantel.
photo by flickr user PV KS

Good morning, Hub readers!

Last week, we asked you to choose the most lovable vehicle in YA lit. Arthur Weasley’s flying Ford Anglia from the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling was clearly the favorite with 64% of your vote. Gansey’s Camaro (“The Pig”) from The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater came in second with 23%, and Hub reader Lucie wrote with the suggestion of Ari’s red truck in Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saenz. You can see detailed results for all of our previous polls in the Polls Archive. Thanks to all of you who voted in the poll!

This week, we’re going to start celebrating Valentine’s Day a little early and ask you to weigh in on which couple from YA lit you’re most hoping will make it work. Whether they’re starcrossed or MFEO, these crazy kids have gotta find a way, right? Vote in the poll below, and tell us in the comments if we missed your favorite lovebirds!

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The Monday Poll: Most Lovable Vehicle in a YA Book

car_credit_martenbjork
photo by flickr user Marten Bjork

Good morning, Hub readers!

Last week, we asked you to tell us which YALSA book award you feel most confident in predicting the winner(s).  Most of you feel like you have a good grasp on the Printz, with 31% of the vote. Tied for second with 20% of the vote each were the Alex Award and the Morris Award. You can see detailed results for all of our previous polls in the Polls Archive, and maybe by the time you read this, you’ll know whether or not your Youth Media Awards predictions came true. Thanks very much to all of you who voted in the poll!

This week, as many of us are at ALA Midwinter and are traveling there and back, transportation is on our minds. We want to know which vehicle in YA lit you find most lovable. Vote in the poll below, and tell us in the comments if we missed your favorite!

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The Monday Poll: YALSA Awards Anticipation

yalsa logoGood morning, Hub readers!

Last week, we wanted to know what you think is the most intriguing YA story about being the Witness Protection Program.  Don’t Look Behind You by Lois Duncan came in first with 38% of the vote, and The Rules for Disappearing by Ashley Elston was a close second with 33%.

We also got some great suggestions in the comments on last week’s poll! Jessica reminded me about Robert Cormier’s classic, I Am The Cheese, and Jenn suggested Roland Smith’s Zach’s Lie and Jack’s Run. You can see detailed results for all of our previous polls in the Polls Archive. Thanks very much to all of you who voted and commented!

This week, we’re getting excited about the announcement of ALA’s Youth Media Awards, which happens next week in Philadelphia at the ALA Midwinter Meeting. Last year on The Hub, we asked which YALSA award you’re most looking forward to. This year, we’re putting a twist on the question– we want to know which YALSA award you feel most confident about predicting the winners. Sometimes everyone’s buzzing about a particular book and you just know it’s going to win that one award– and sometimes the winners come out of left field as a delightful surprise. Which YALSA award do you think you have a handle on this year?

Vote in the poll below, and feel free to leave your predictions in the comments– and keep in mind that we here at The Hub don’t have any insider info, so we’re just as excited as you are to find out the winners next week!

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The Monday Poll: Coolest Tattoo in YA Lit

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photo by flickr user Kelvyn Skee

Good morning, Hub readers!

Last week, we asked which winter 2014 sequel you’re most looking forward to reading. With twenty titles to choose from, it was a tough call! Cress by Marissa Meyer took the lead with 34% of the vote, followed by Hollow City by Ransom Riggs, which garnered 21% of the vote. The Unbound by Victoria Schwab wasn’t far behind with 18% of the vote. You can see detailed results for all of our previous polls in the Polls Archive. Thanks very much to all of you who voted!

This week, we want to know what you think is the coolest tattoo in YA lit. Vote in the poll below, and be sure to comment if we’ve missed your favorite!

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